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Women in Psychology- Karen Horney

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Women in Psychology- Karen Horney

Student Name

PSY 310

(Instructor) Cheri Meadowlark

February 25, 2013

Women in Psychology: Karen Horney Karen Horney was a female psychological pioneer. She was a theorist in personality, psychoanalysis, along with feminine psychology. Karen Horney also had some theories about ones needs.
Background

Clotilde “Sonni” and Berndt Danielsen welcomed their second child Karen Clementina Theodora Danielsen on September 16, 1885. Karen was born in Blankenese, a small village on the north bank of Elbe, Germany. Karen’s parents had Dutch-Norwegian origins and upheld the values and principles of a European family in Victorian times (Rubins, 1978). Berndt was the captain of a ship. He did not only deliver his commands on the ocean, but he also delivered them at him. Berndt had four boys form a previous marriage, and two children with Karen’s mother; Karen was the youngest of her brothers and the only daughter. In the 1800’s a women was expected to marry if she was not going to live her life as a caretaker for her own mother or as nun. Clotide, was referred to as Sonni by Berndt and her children because she was such a freethinker. Karen’s father was harshly religious and she was only allowed to read the bible after she learned how to read. Berndt applied the values of his religious belief harshly at home and commanded total loyalty to the church (Rubins, 1978). Karen’s childhood was difficult and by the time she was nine years old she began to battle depression. Karen became uneasy toward religion, along with social expectations and gender roles. Karen was confused on why she was not treated equally to her brother and her father seemed to prefer Berndt junior over…...

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