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Who Is Responsible for the Financial Crisis

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Enough!!! Who is responsible for the Financial Crisis?

Everyone who tries to answer this question just points fingers, and the ones who are being pointed to, react by saying: “Hey, it wasn’t me or my company, I trusted the system,” or “I relied on somebody else’s judgment.” Some people blame the consumers for spending too much; some blame the banks for their lending practices, while others blame the credit agencies for their vague ratings. But by now, we are completely sure of one thing; the housing bubble was one factor that generated this financial crisis. So, who is to be blame for creating the housing bubble? According to John Taylor’s article, “How Government Created the Financial Crisis,” lax policies implemented by the Federal Reserve (Fed) caused the financial crisis. As a response to John Taylor’s opinion, Alan Greenspan’s article, “The Fed Didn’t Cause the Housing Bubble”, defends the Fed’s policies and places the fault on mortgage rates, such as long-term or fixed mortgages, as the real cause that triggered the Housing bubble. Even though John Taylor’s, a professor of Economics at Stanford, and Alan Greenspan’s, a former chairman of the Federal reserve, opinions are strongly supported by facts, I’m truly fed up of hearing excuses and finger pointing about the current financial crisis. The fact is that both the Fed’s policies and the rates on mortgages initiated the housing bubble, and I can’t reject either explanation. However I believe that it is time to start thinking about the future, thus, we should worry about how the Fed’s policies should be managed to stimulate the domestic and international US economy for the future.

According to John Taylor, it’s the Government’s fault for maintaining interest rates lower than normal during 2003-2005. Even though he is right, one should remember that the Fed lowered the interest rates as a…...

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