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Utilitarianism Ethics

In: Business and Management

Submitted By avera28
Words 1112
Pages 5
Kimberly Avera
Dr. A. Brown, Professor
Business Ethics 368
September 5, 2015
Utilitarianism

Unlike so many methods which try to define morality, utilitarianism philosophers simply believed that morality is about happiness and not about following rules. It is ultimately the child of egoism and Kantian duty. Often defined as what views are best for individuals and the people that may surrounded by them who will be affected by the actions taken. Utilitarianism can be describe in two units, act utilitarianism and rule utilitarianism. In this paper, we will look at it from three different philosophers’ perspective: Jeremy Bentham, Immanuel Kant and will show how utilitarianism played a major part in the withdrawal of the acquisition between Lockheed Martin and Northrop.
Utilitarianism seems to be an easy thing to grasp and comprehend. Well, it should be since so many recognized philosophers adapted and jointly bridged the differences of this subject. One in particular, Jeremy Bentham, contributed to this subject greatly. His writings and dissection of laws was a craft lie none other. Throughout his life, several writings of his has made him famous regarding the definition of Utilitarianism. Being the avid reader that he was, after the publishing of the Declaration of Independence, Bentham began to write. He wrote the essay “Short Review of the Declaration” that was in the British response to the Americas. After this piece, he then published his first book A Fragment on Government (1776), followed by the Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation (1789), which was based on the moral theory of the principle of utility. This book, by most scholars in Ethics, have noted it as the best book Bentham have written. This book is his first contribution to the Utilitarianism phase of Ethics. Bentham wanted to rid the legality fictions that the world was so…...

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