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STUDENT HANDBOOK

Adult Student Program Handbook

TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION ....................................................................................................................................................... 1 OFFICE LOCATION .......................................................................................................................................................... 1 OFFICE HOURS ............................................................................................................................................................... 1 CONTACT INFORMATION ................................................................................................................................................ 1 School of Professional Education Faculty ..................................................................................................... 1 MISSION AND PURPOSE OF THE COLLEGE ................................................................................................... 2 ACCREDITATION ............................................................................................................................................................ 2 STRATEGY & OUTCOMES ............................................................................................................................................... 2 PERFORMANCE OUTCOMES ............................................................................................................................................ 3 Fit Hearts (Socially Responsible: Cultural & Relational) ............................................................................. 3 Fit Souls (Spiritually Responsive: Spiritual & Environmental) ..................................................................... 3 Fit Minds (Rationally Competent: Intellectual & Psychological) .................................................................. 3 Fit Bodies (Professionally Astute: Physical & Vocational) ........................................................................... 3 ACADEMIC INFORMATION ................................................................................................................................. 5 STUDENT EXPECTATIONS ............................................................................................................................................... 5 ACADEMIC CALENDAR .................................................................................................................................................. 5 ACADEMIC INTEGRITY ................................................................................................................................................... 5 ATTENDANCE ................................................................................................................................................................. 6 On-Ground Students ....................................................................................................................................... 6 Online Students ............................................................................................................................................... 6 Scheduled Breaks for Online Students ............................................................................................................ 6 LIBRARY......................................................................................................................................................................... 7 ACADEMIC LOAD ........................................................................................................................................................... 7 TEXTBOOKS AND CURRICULUM ..................................................................................................................................... 7 On-ground Students ........................................................................................................................................ 7 On-line Students .............................................................................................................................................. 7 GRADES .......................................................................................................................................................................... 8 LATE WORK POLICY ...................................................................................................................................................... 8 INCOMPLETE GRADES..................................................................................................................................................... 8 GRADE REPORTS ............................................................................................................................................................ 8 WITHDRAWAL FROM THE COLLEGE ............................................................................................................................... 8 READMISSION TO THE DEGREE COMPLETION PROGRAM ............................................................................................... 9 GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS AND PARTICIPATION IN COMMENCEMENT ..................................................................... 9 Honor Society: Alpha Sigma Lambda Society ................................................................................................ 9 Dean’s List .................................................................................................................................................... 10 ACADEMIC STANDARDS ............................................................................................................................................... 10 TUITION AND FEES ....................................................................................................................................................... 11 FINANCIAL AID ...................................................................................................................................................... 12 FEDERAL PELL GRANT ................................................................................................................................................. 12 FEDERAL DIRECT STAFFORD LOAN PROGRAM ............................................................................................................. 12 OTHER RESOURCES ...................................................................................................................................................... 12 ALUMNI GRANT ........................................................................................................................................................... 12 DISABILITY & SPECIAL SERVICES ................................................................................................................. 13 RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES .................................................................................................................................... 13 DOCUMENTATION REQUIREMENTS .............................................................................................................................. 14 REASONABLE ACCOMMODATIONS ............................................................................................................................... 15 ADDITIONAL DOCUMENTATION REQUIREMENTS.......................................................................................................... 16 Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD) ......................................................................................... 16 Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing ........................................................................................................................... 16

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Physical Disability and/or Health-Related Impairment ............................................................................... 16 Psychological and/or Psychiatric Disability ................................................................................................ 16 Specific Learning Disabilities ....................................................................................................................... 17 Speech Impairment ....................................................................................................................................... 18 Visual Impairment ........................................................................................................................................ 18

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INTRODUCTION
This handbook is available for students enrolled in one of the degree programs offered by Central Christian College’s School of Professional and Distance Education (SPE). This handbook will serve to augment the catalog concerning programs, curriculum, facilitators, policies and procedures, and other information relating to the programs. If you would like to obtain further information, please contact the SPE offices. This handbook is available electronically to all students, who are therefore responsible for knowing the information and observing the policies contained herein. Central Christian College reserves the right to make changes to any and all policies within this handbook. Any such changes affecting the SPE programs will be made available in subsequent issues of this handbook. OFFICE LOCATION The School of Professional and Distance Education offices are located at 1200 S. Main Street, McPherson, Kansas, within the main campus administration building on the Central Christian College campus. OFFICE HOURS The SPE office is open daily from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CT. Voice mail is available if calls are made at other times. CONTACT INFORMATION The SPE office telephone number is (620) 241-0723, toll-free (800) 835-0078, and fax number (620) 241- 4030, and website: www.centralchristian.edu. Associate Dean of the School of Professional and Distance Education……..Cheyenne Kroeker Director of Criminal Justice…………………………………………………………Tom Greco Assistant Director of Financial Aid…………………………………………...…Nichole Carver Enrollment Manager (Global Health Education)…………….…………………….Brad Hansen Enrollment Manager (Savant Learning Systems)…………………………………Scott Brooks Assistant Registrar…………………………………………………………………….Rose Epp Excel Program Manager……………………………………………………………Tina Golden Dual Credit………………………………………………………………………Dr .Dea Favara Online Writing Center Director……………………………………………………Katie Grubbs
SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION FACULTY

Enrique Barreiro, Dr. Joan Bowman, Danielle Claassen, Joshua Cooper, Tonya Deal, Chris Dyer, Danette Eis, Dr.Wendy Flint, Dr. Jerree Forbes, Kristen Hamilton, Joe Harmon, Kyle Hoodman, Aaron Hoxie, Gary Jones, Damion Josephs, Jake Kaufman, Cheyenne Kroeker, Jodi Leatherman, Wendy Lorenz, Bob Marsh, Marty Michelson, Diane Miller, Arnot Munguya, David Page, Vincent Painter, Geoginne Parisi, Janelle Rardon, Dr. Dwight Reimer, Renee Rivera, Stephanie Schnorbus, Suzee Shugart, Rebecca Sidorvich, Daniel Smith, Leah Smith, Reid Thomas, Eric Walter, Autumn, Bill Bach, Jim Bridges, Jack Brown, Wade Carter, Mindi Caskey, Marty Conboy, Jeff Deal, Sarah Halbmaier, Kade Hendricks, Mike Jones, Wallce Miller, Daniel Mobley, Mary Nelson, Richard Nitsch, Lisa Pitts, Dave Points, John Tucker, Amanda Voth, Sean Wallace

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MISSION AND PURPOSE OF THE COLLEGE
Central Christian College of Kansas, established in 1884, is an evangelical Christian college in the Wesleyan tradition. The college provides liberal arts and career-entry programs leading to Bachelor and Associate degrees. Central Christian is committed to academic excellence, integration of faith and learning, talent development, formation of a growing personal faith in Jesus Christ, and preparation for a life of servant leadership. Central Christian has a philosophy of viewing individuals as “whole, integrated persons.” The intellectual, spiritual, social, and physical aspects fit together to form a “whole person.” This concept is suggested in Luke 2:52: “And Jesus increased in wisdom, stature, and in favor with God and man.” The mission of the College is, “Christ-centered Education for Character”. ACCREDITATION Central Christian College is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. STRATEGY & OUTCOMES Outcomes serve as the objectives used to gauge the institution’s achievement in the fulfillment of its mission and vision. Each outcome signifies a distinct quality that can be used to quantify institutional progress and are useful in the evaluative process. Subordinate measures can be used as performance indicators1.
1 Possible 2 Liddell, H. G. & Scott, R. (1867). Greek-English Lexicon based on the German work of Francis Passow. New York, NY: Harper & Brothers

measures include entry/exit exams, capstone projects, comprehensive residential responses (personal growth reflection), as well as other tools.

If the mission of the institution is to produce a Christ-centered education for character, the institution is faced with the responsibility of defining and measuring that end. Character can be described as the summative qualities that define an individual. The etymology of the word demonstrates that it signifies the manner of life and encompassed the internal disposition and nature of the individual, as approved by external actions and behaviors2. The distinct merits and virtues are not necessarily identified, since character itself was defined through the observation of the individual, not necessarily by a comparison to an outside standard. In Luke 2:52 we find a description of the development outcomes associated with Jesus. The gospel writer asserts Jesus “grew in wisdom and stature and in favor with God and man.” This description captures the holistic reality of humanity, recognizing both our horizontal relationship within creation and our vertical relationship with the Creator. Jesus further provides a glimpse of development when questioned about the greatest commandment. He responded, “Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength” (Mark 12:28-30). In essence, these four criteria (heart, soul, mind, and strength) were presented terminal values representing the highest ideals of human functioning. Each criterion represents an essential element of character, which allows the individual to grow in wisdom, stature, and favor. These same ideals serve as the basis through which Central Christian College has chosen to measure the effectiveness of its mission. It is important to note that there is no hierarchal structure to these four elements. One is

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not necessarily more important than another and no one element can be viewed in isolation from the others, since the four operate in relation to one another. PERFORMANCE OUTCOMES
FIT HEARTS (SOCIALLY RESPONSIBLE: CULTURAL & RELATIONAL)

The curriculum and written assignments within the SPE programs are designed to present the courses through Christian thought. Diversity issues are embedded throughout the programs including the intentional inclusion of multiple ethnic staff, faculty, and students.
FIT SOULS (SPIRITUALLY RESPONSIVE: SPIRITUAL & ENVIRONMENTAL)

Each of the SPE programs include specific assignments designed to include Christian thought, i.e. discussion thread questions, assigned course topics, and other appropriate avenues of inclusion. Chapels are specifically designed to personally challenge students to encounter God individually while worshiping corporately. Through relevant worship, community, communion, and application of scripture, Chapel serves as the fuel that can propel students on toward full devotion to Christ. Online students will find a link to the Chapel in every online course. The following link will provide access to the Chapel schedule. http://centralchristian.edu/current/chapelschedule.asp
FIT MINDS (RATIONALLY COMPETENT: INTELLECTUAL & PSYCHOLOGICAL)

The adult student will receive tools for personal and professional career advancement. Critical thinking skills will be evident upon completing the SPE Bachelor Program which will provide the opportunity to pursue a graduate degree. Employment opportunities are presented in the SPE newsletter and other appropriate venues. http://www.resume-now.com
FIT BODIES (PROFESSIONALLY ASTUTE: PHYSICAL & VOCATIONAL)

The adult student will demonstrate a commitment to participate in healthy lifestyle choices. The curriculum is designed to identify individual behavioral and leadership skills that will lead to wise vocational choices. Examples of some tools to assist in this area are as follows: http://www.myfitnesspal.com/ http://iphone.appstorm.net/roundups/lifestyle-roundups/50-unique-journal-and-diary-apps/ SEXUAL HARASSMENT/VERBAL ABUSE/ABUSIVE OR HOSTILE ENVIRONMENT In accordance with Title IX, Central Christian College affirms that its Students, Faculty, Staff, and Administrators have the right to be free from sexual harassment by any member of the College community. In order to emphasize respect for the dignity of persons, Central Christian College will not tolerate sexual harassment, or the existence of a verbally abusive or hostile environment. Sexual harassment is defined as attempted sexual coercion, unwelcome sexual advances, and requests for sexual favors, physical conduct of a sexual nature, or verbal conduct of a sexual nature. Therefore, any words or behavior that produces an atmosphere of intimidation or hostility or is verbally abusive is viewed as harassment. This also includes sexual harassment by use of e-mail, texting and online discussion. Central Christian College is prepared to handle sexual harassment complaints in strict confidence. Any individual who believes he or she has been sexually harassed may submit a written and signed complaint to the Sexual Harassment Officer, who at the present time is Chris Smith, Chief Student

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Affairs Officer. When a formal complaint is filed, the Sexual Harassment Officer will thoroughly investigate the matter in confidence. If the incident involves Faculty or Staff, Chris Smith, Chief Student Affairs Officer, will advise any further action. After reviewing all the facts, it will be decided whether reasonable grounds exist to believe that sexual harassment has occurred. If the incident involves students only, the case will then be taken to the Judicial Affairs Committee. Disciplinary action, including expulsion or employment termination, may be taken against any student, Faculty or Staff member, or Administrator who is found guilty of sexual harassment. GRIEVANCE/APPEALS A student with a grievance in reference to an academic issue or grade should first attempt to resolve the issue through the faculty member. If no reasonable resolution has been made, the student may submit a written appeal to the Dean of Professional and Distance Education. The Dean will meet with the student to determine the course of action. If at any point the student or the Dean determines that the appeal process has halted, either party can petition the Academic Affairs and Assessment Committee, which will consider the appeal and respond to the student in writing.

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ACADEMIC INFORMATION
STUDENT EXPECTATIONS
Full Degree and Degree Completion These programs are designed to accommodate those adult learners who may work full-time or part-time. The SPE programs are offered in the evening 6:00 – 10:00 pm. or asynchronous online.

Online Degree Programs are presented in an asynchronous format, meaning that students must be self-directed and goal-oriented individuals who now would like to complete their Bachelor's Degree. On-Ground Degree Programs are presented in five-week sessions that meet one night each week. Adult learners are expected to spend 20-27 hours in preparation and class time weekly. Nontraditional students are self-directed and goal-oriented individuals. The SPE Programs enable learners to develop: • Interpersonal skills • Written and oral communication skills • Problem-solving and decision-making skills • Understanding of research techniques and applications • Competence in Biblical understanding • An appreciation for the integration of faith and learning ACADEMIC CALENDAR The program operates on a term basis with five or six-week courses. Each student is given a definite schedule that indicates on which dates classes will be offered over the period of enrollment. ACADEMIC INTEGRITY
We are committed at Central Christian College to ethical practice in teaching, scholarship, and service. As such, plagiarism and other forms of academic dishonesty will not be tolerated. It is imperative that you present all written, oral, and or preformed work with a clear indication of the source of that work. If it is completely your own, you are encouraged to present it as such, taking pleasure in ownership of your own created work. However, it is also imperative that you give full credit to any and all others whose work you have included in your presentation via paraphrase, direct quotation, and or performance, citing the name(s) or the author(s) creator(s) and the source of the work with appropriate reference information. To do otherwise is to put oneself in jeopardy of being sanctioned for an act or acts of plagiarism that can carry serious consequences up to and including expulsion from the college; (see College Catalog for progressive policy implementation).

ADMINISTRATIVE DISMISSAL (ACADEMIC INTEGRITY) Academic dishonesty is considered a breach of the Code of Character signed by all students as part of their admissions process. Therefore, the College reserves the right to dismiss a student due to academic dishonesty. Level - I: In writing, the instructor confronts the student with plagiarism proof and sends a copy to the appropriate Student Services Office.

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Level - II: In writing, the learner responds to the Faculty of record with a copy to the Student Services Office and the Dean of Professional and Distance Education. Level - III: In writing, the Faculty documents the interaction with the student and requests a final decision from the Dean of Professional Education and the Vice President of Academics.

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ATTENDANCE
ON-GROUND STUDENTS

Due to the concentrated scheduling and the emphasis upon participatory learning, adult learners need to be in attendance every week. Absence due to illness or other emergency situations must be made up through activities required by the facilitator in that module. If an on-ground student misses two weeks of a module, he or she will be required to retake that specific module with a $100 additional charge. It is the student’s responsibility to contact the facilitator in advance of any anticipated absences to discuss class content that will be missed. It is also the student’s responsibility to contact the facilitator following any unanticipated absences. The facilitator determines make-up assignments for all absences. It is expected that make-up arrangements will be equivalent to four hours of instruction time. Class disruptions should be kept to a minimum. Out of respect to your facilitators and other cohort members, please be punctual to class, stay for the duration, and silence all cell phones and pagers. Class cancelation decision due to weather or unsafe conditions will be made by the Dean of SPE prior to 4:00 pm (CST) on class meeting nights, check your email account in advance of coming to the campus.
ONLINE STUDENTS

Online students are expected to log into their class a minimum of three different days during the week. Simply logging into the electronic classroom learning management system (LMS) does not automatically count toward attendance. To earn credit for attendance, students are expected to engage in any activities that demonstrate active participation in a class. These activities can include but are not limited to: • posting to the threaded discussion area • submitting assignments • downloading documents • attending Class LIVE synchronous meetings • taking an exam
SCHEDULED BREAKS FOR ONLINE STUDENTS

When scheduled breaks take place during any term, affected weeks will be open for participation allowing highly- motivated students to use the break time to read ahead. • Students are always welcome to check into the Ask Questions section periodically during their break, however, students should not expect that faculty will be available to them during this period. • Threaded discussion questions will be closed during break. Students will be able to access discussion questions when school resumes after break. • Please review these details with your faculty. The SPE and Student Service office will monitor weekly attendance records. Attendance records are essential to complying with regulations established by the Veterans’ Administration and Health and Human Services Department for recipients of VA benefits or federally-insured student loans.

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If long-term medical, family, or employment conflicts develop, the adult learner must contact the Program Director and Student Services immediately. These individuals will assist the adult learner to determine the best options relating to the program both academically and financially. LIBRARY The Library Reference Staff, in cooperation with the facilitators in the SPE Programs, can provide instruction in basic information gathering, including learning the basics of database searching and critical-thinking skills. These life-long learning skills are essential for preparing students to function effectively in this "information society." The SPE adult learners are encouraged to use the services and resources of the Library, which may be accessed through the college. The following link will provide students with access to the electronic library: http://www.centralchristian.edu/academics/library.asp ACADEMIC LOAD An SPE learner load of 12 credit hours per term qualifies the individual for full-time status. SPE students need to openly discuss this program and its demands both with their family and their employer (if applicable). This is a program with many demands and requirements, thus the student will need the support and encouragement of those around them. FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION In addition to the rights of the faculty member, the College also provides rights to students concerning Freedom of Expression. Members of the Central Christian College community, including students and invited guests, are granted the privilege to write about or discuss any subject of intellectual inquiry without fear of censorship, discipline, or intimidation. This freedom does not provide the right to individuals to say anything without regard to others. Civility and respect are foundational components of freedom of expression. A hostile environment limits the expression of ideas and therefore undermines the diverse expression of opinion. Faculty are invited to create a safe environment where, as members of a learning community, the entire college community can engage ideas through scholarly investigation and inquiry. Understanding this, the performance of students should be assessed solely on their ability to fulfill the outcomes prescribed in course syllabi, not on opinions shared in class, i.e. discussion threads and live sessions, verbal behavior inside or outside of the classroom, or due to matters not related to academic performance. TEXTBOOKS AND CURRICULUM
ON-GROUND STUDENTS

Curriculum materials are distributed one week prior to the start of every module. If a student is absent from class on a night when new materials are distributed, it is his or her responsibility to contact the SPE office to make arrangements to receive materials. Textbooks are to be returned to the SPE office at the end of each course. Students interested in purchasing specific materials can do so at the same cost at which the school purchases them.
ON-LINE STUDENTS

Student enrolled in an online program will find the curriculum embedded in the Learning Management System. Beyond the curriculum, students enrolled in an online program will need to

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secure textbooks as directed. Please review the process for accessing textbooks and course materials. The process is dependent upon the program in which he or she is enrolled. Ministry Students: http://www.textbookx.com Other Online Programs: http://www.ccconlinestore.com

GRADES Letter grades are given for all coursework in the Degree Completion Program. Any module in which the adult learner receives an “F” must be repeated in order to complete the program. Facilitators are asked to submit grades within one week from the end of each module. Grades are available through the Portal. LATE WORK POLICY The SPE programs have a “no late work” policy. Exceptions can be made with consultation from the faculty and SPE Dean of Professional Education. INCOMPLETE GRADES Incomplete grades are not awarded in any of the SPE programs. GRADE REPORTS Once the SPE students have received a grade report, an unofficial transcript (including those grades and all previous courses and grades) will be available on the portal. Unofficial transcripts can be printed from the portal. Official transcripts are available upon request. Transcript requests must be made in writing. Transcript request forms can be downloaded from the college’s website. The following link will provide access to the college website transcript request form. http://www.centralchristian.edu/academics/transferrequest.asp Official transcripts can be sent directly from the College to schools, employers, agencies, or to the adult learner. However, the adult learner must be in good standing with the business office and college library in order for transcripts to be released. When using a transcript request form, the request must contain: the adult learner’s name (including maiden name if applicable), social security number, specific dates of attendance, and names and addresses for where the transcripts are to be sent. If specific terms or course grades are to be included, that information must be noted so that the transcript is not sent before the data is posted to the record. The student’s signature and a $5.00 fee are required for processing. WITHDRAWAL FROM THE COLLEGE Students who wish to withdraw completely from the college are encouraged to officially notify the (SPE) School of Professional Education in writing, of their intent to cease attendance from all

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classes. Students who do not provide written notification and cease attending courses will be involuntarily withdrawn within 14 days of the last day of attendance. If the withdrawal occurs within the first 60% of the term, a pro rata adjustment will be made to the student’s financial aid disbursements and term charges. Any refunds of unearned financial aid will be returned to the original sources, and unearned charges will be credited to the students account. If the withdrawal occurs after the first 60% of the term, no adjustment will be made to the student’s financial aid disbursements or term charges. The student has been determined to have earned all financial aid and all term charges. This is an abridged version of the college’s withdrawal policy. For a more detailed version of the college’s withdrawal policy, please see a copy of the current college catalog. READMISSION TO THE DEGREE COMPLETION PROGRAM An adult learner who has dropped out of a group, but wishes to return to a new group must: 1. Notify the School of Professional Education Program Office of their desire to return 2. Complete and submit a new transfer credit acknowledgement form with courses for the remainder of the term(s) listed 3. Provide evidence that financial arrangements have been made 4. In order to graduate, the adult learner must be classified as an active student and must ensure that all incomplete or failed modules are successfully completed. GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS AND PARTICIPATION IN COMMENCEMENT All Graduating students, both online and on-ground, are invited to participate in the commencement ceremony on the McPherson, Kansas campus. To be considered for participation in commencement exercises with cap, gown, and tassel, an adult learner must be enrolled in the final courses of his/her program, and must be within 6 credits of completing their degree as of the day of commencement, as determined by the registrar of Central Christian College of Kansas. Diplomas will be mailed to all adult learners upon the completion of the required courses for their degree. To graduate, an adult learner must be classified as “active” and have a cumulative GPA of 2.0
HONOR SOCIETY: ALPHA SIGMA LAMBDA SOCIETY

Central Christian College offers the chance for students to be inducted in a national honor society. Alpha Sigma Lambda's aim is to recognize the special achievements of adult graduates who accomplish academic excellence while facing competing interests of home and work. Alpha Sigma Lambda is dedicated to the advancement of scholarship and recognizes high scholastic achievement in an adult student's career. By so doing, this Society encourages many students to continue toward and to earn Masters, or Doctorate degrees. Through leadership born of effort, both scholastically and fraternally, Alpha Sigma Lambda inspires its candidates

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to give of their strengths to their fellow students and communities through their academic achievements. Nominations will be submitted by Central Christian College Faculty, Graduating Students, and Administration Staff. A committee will be appointed to make the final decision. The selection process for this award is always difficult, particularly since we are limited by the national organization to selecting only a small percentage of our graduating class. The National standards for student membership in Alpha Sigma Lambda are as follows: • Members must be matriculated and have a minimum of 24 graded semester hours or the • equivalent** and shall be matriculated students in an undergraduate degree program. These college credits must not include transfer credits. All credits must be taken through and graded at the matriculating institution and must be included in the student's cumulative GPA. • At least 12 credits of a student's total credits should be earned in courses in Liberal Arts/Sciences. If the student has not earned 12 Liberal Arts/Sciences credits within the 24 credits completed at the matriculating institution, accepted transfer courses may be used to meet this requirement. • Members shall be selected only from the highest 10 percent of the graduating class who have 24 graded credits and are matriculated in an undergraduate degree program. • Those selected must have a minimum grade point index of 3.5 on a 4.0 scale or its equivalent. The cumulative scholastic record of the student as interpreted by the institution where membership is to be conferred shall be the basis for computing scholastic eligibility.
DEAN’S LIST

Dean's List students must have completed at least 12 credit hours with an earned average GPA of 3.85 or higher. The Bi-Annual Dean’s List includes the names of matriculated undergraduate students who are pursuing their first undergraduate degree. Appropriate entries regarding inclusion on the Dean's List are determined from the student's academic record. Students will be notified of his or her bi-annual Dean's List standing with a letter from the Dean. Dean's Letters are distributed electronically, thus recipients receive notification and download instructions via e-mail sent to their CCC-provided e-mail address, to be compliant with FERPA regulations. Dean's Letters are generated twice per-year, a few weeks after grades are posted (June & December). In addition to the recognition letter, an official certificate will be mailed to the awardee from Central Christian College. Dean's Letters are only generated for students who meet the Dean's List criteria at that time. These letters are not issued or updated based on late changes to the academic record. ACADEMIC STANDARDS Providing services and appropriate/reasonable accommodations to students with disabilities does not mean excusing a student with a disability from responsibilities or lowering expectations in the classroom, but rather allowing the student to use her/his abilities to assimilate information or perform class work in a manner that allows fair completion with other students. Therefore, students should not expect classes or class requirements to be waived even though they may have been waived at the high school or other institutions where they may have attended. For example, waiving the

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math requirement for a student desiring to major in architecture or a medical field would not be approved, for any student, because math classes are an essential element of the program. Without math classes, the student would not be considered “otherwise” qualified for the education program.

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FINANCES
TUITION AND FEES For the most up-to-date and comprehensive list of fees and tuition, please see the most recent version of the Catalog. Student fees are due at the beginning of each program term. Credit for Prior Learning Fee and $50.00 for each semester hour Technical and Professional Training fee petitioned. It is important to note that petitioning for prior learning credit does not guarantee that the full number of hours petitioned for will be granted. Awards of credit are based upon evaluation of the applicant’s work by a faculty in the particular academic field involved. College Level Examination Program (CLEP) Tuition, Books $50.00 for each semester credit hour, See catalog for passing requirements. Tuition and book costs may vary based on the program. Consult your Financial Aid Counselor for specific cost. $100.00 per credit hour in addition to the standard tuition rate (only offered on an individual basis as approved by the SPE office). $100.00—paid at the beginning of the final term regardless of whether or not the student participates in the commencement ceremony

Directed Study Fee

Graduation Fee

In cases where the employer may cover full or partial tuition, the student will pay for the first term and then be reimbursed according to the employer’s policy. This will cover tuition, books and materials usage fees for the first term of courses. The employer reimbursement can be used to pay for subsequent terms. The student is responsible for processing all documents necessary to secure reimbursement from the employer. Special payment arrangements need to be agreed upon and approved by the Director of Finance of Central Christian College. In some cases, monthly payments may be approved. Central Christian College is able to accept Visa, Discover, and MasterCard for the payment of tuition and fees. For your convenience, payments may be made through the college’s online portal).

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FINANCIAL AID
(See Catalog for Specific Information) Any adult learner wishing to apply for financial assistance should contact the Financial Aid Office. Financial Aid personnel are available to answer questions and to help estimate eligibility for financial assistance. Normal office hours are Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CT. Other hours are available by appointment. FEDERAL PELL GRANT Federal and state grants are awarded based upon financial need. The student does not need to repay these funds. Federal Pell grants are provided by the federal government and administered by the college. FEDERAL DIRECT STAFFORD LOAN PROGRAM Federal Direct Stafford Loans are available to undergraduate students demonstrating financial need. After determining aid eligibility, Financial Aid personnel will advise the student on how to borrow under this program. OTHER RESOURCES Veterans' Benefits—Available to those who qualify. Eligibility is determined by the Veterans' Administration and potentially eligible students should contact their local Veterans' Administration representative. Employee Reimbursement Program—Contact your company's personnel office to investigate this source of financial assistance. Private Alternative Loans—Contact the Financial Aid Dept. for more information. ALUMNI GRANT For dependent students of Central Christian College alumni, the alumni grant is an award of $1,000 each year the dependent student chooses to attend Central Christian College of Kansas School of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Recipients must be dependent children of an alumni who attended fulltime for at least 1 term. Students who identify themselves as alum dependents are verified through the Alumni Office. Once verified, recipients will be awarded $1,000 per year renewable each year of their residential enrollment at CCC. Students will be notified of their eligibility on their award letter.

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DISABILITY & SPECIAL SERVICES
Central Christian College is committed to providing an environment in which all students are given a reasonable opportunity to learn and work to their full potential. It is our goal to provide each student with maximum independence and participation in the college campus life. In compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, Central Christian College will provide reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities documented by a licensed professional. Reasonable accommodation is a modification or adjustment to a course, program service, activity, or facility. It is designed to offer an identified student with a disability reasonable access to the same opportunities, benefits, and privileges available to a similar student without a disability. The accommodation is not required if it would fundamentally alter the nature of the course, program, service, or facility, or if it would result in an undue burden for the institution. To determine reasonable accommodations, Central Christian College will seek information from appropriate personnel regarding essential standards for courses, programs, services, activities, and facilities. Central Christian College recognizes a student with a disability as anyone who has submitted appropriate documentation of a physical, psychological or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities, including learning. Admitted students must submit appropriate documentation of the disability. Although students are not required to identify themselves as having a disability, it is important that they know they are not eligible for support until the proper documentation (by a licensed professional) has been submitted. Accommodations are made on an individual basis, determined by the nature of the documented disability and the specific college program and facilities involved. The law requires maintaining strict confidentiality of records and of information documenting a disability. Student Disability Services at Central Christian College will only disclose the specific nature of a student’s disability when the student requests the release of information. RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES Students with disabilities at Central Christian College have the right to: • Access courses, programs, services, activities, and facilities offered through the college. • Work, learn, and receive reasonable accommodations, academic adjustments and/or auxiliary aids and services. • Confidentiality of all information about their disability except as disclosures are required or permitted by law. Students with disabilities at Central Christian College have the responsibility to: • Meet qualifications and maintain essential standards for courses, programs, services, and activities at the college. • Self-identify (disclose) as an individual with a disability and seek information, counsel, and assistance when necessary. • Demonstrate and/or document (from an appropriate licensed professional) the disability. • Follow procedures for obtaining reasonable accommodations. • Request specific accommodations in a timely fashion, and ensure that the professor is aware of needed accommodations prior to each event (e.g., each exam).

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Understand the intent of the law. The law was meant to level the playing field and to give equal access, not an unfair advantage. Therefore, students are obligated to meet essential program requirements and are not entitled to accommodations that will eliminate, modify, or fundamentally alter the requirements of the course regardless of disability classification/status. Students must satisfy essential academic requirements and standards of the institution.

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Office of Disability Services – Student Success Special Services The Office of Disability Services has the right to: • Identify and establish appropriate accommodations for courses, programs, services, activities, and facilities. • Request and receive current documentation that supports the request and need for accommodations, academic adjustments and/or auxiliary aids and services. • Deny a request for accommodations, academic adjustments, and/or auxiliary aids and services if the documentation demonstrates that the request is not warranted or reasonable, or if the individual fails to provide appropriate documentation. The Office of Disability Services has the responsibility to: • Provide or arrange reasonable accommodations, academic adjustments, and/or auxiliary aids and services for students as warranted and available without hardship to the College. • Maintain appropriate confidentiality of records and communication, except where permitted or required by law. • Make referrals for counseling, student health center, career center, and other departments or organizations when appropriate. Faculty and Staff The Faculty and Staff have the right to: • Receive verification of a documented disability from the student in the form of a faculty accommodation letter. The Student Support Plan will be generated by the Director of Student Success Special Services using information from the documentation, the student’s reported history and disability support staff in Student Development. • Contact the Director of Student Success to discuss accommodations. The Faculty and Staff have the responsibility to: • Keep all disability-related information regarding a student confidential. • Maintain the same standards for students with disabilities as are applied to all other students. • Provide and arrange any reasonable classroom accommodations as discussed in the faculty accommodation letter. • Inform students of procedures for arranging accommodations at the beginning of each semester. A statement on the syllabus regarding accommodations is to be included on every syllabus. DOCUMENTATION REQUIREMENTS In order to provide reasonable and appropriate academic accommodations to those students at Central Christian College who have disabilities, the Office of Student Success Special Services requires documentation, which shows the current disability and its impact on academic functioning. Therefore, the documentation the student provides to Student Special Services must follow the criteria: 1. Documentation must be current. The determination of what is current documentation depends on the nature of the disability. However, in most cases documentation should be within the last three (3) years. Student Special Services reserves the right to make appropriate modifications to this time frame.

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2. The name, title, and professional credentials of the evaluator including information about license or certification, as well as, area of specialization, employment, and state in which the individual practices. Professionals who conduct the evaluation/assessment must be qualified to do so, and it is essential that they have experience working with adolescent/adult populations. 3. Reports must be on letterhead, typed, dated, and have the original signature of the evaluator. Reports must be written in English or translated into English by a qualified translator. 4. Reports need to include the names of any standardized tests administered, the scores derived from these tests and a discussion of the data that clearly indicates the presence of a disability. Student Disability Services reserves the right to determine which tests are acceptable for diagnosing the disability. Standardized tests must be based on adult norms. 5. The report must clearly state the specific diagnosis of the disability. Terms such as "suggest" or "is indicative of" are not acceptable. 6. The evaluator must describe the impact of the diagnosed disability on a specific major life function/activity (especially as it relates to academic performance). 7. A clinical diagnosis is not synonymous with a disability. That is, evidence sufficient to render a clinical diagnosis might not be adequate to determine that an individual is substantially limited in a major life activity. The documentation must include the student's specific current functional impairment(s) and describe how the disorder/impairment substantially limits one or more major life activities in order for Student Counselor to fully evaluate the necessity for academic adjustments, auxiliary aids, and/or auxiliary services. Additional information may be required. 8. The diagnostic report should include specific recommendations for reasonable academic accommodations and a detailed explanation of the rationale for each recommended accommodation as related to the specific functional limitations. 9. If medications are taken, they should be listed as well as their potential side effects. If symptoms involve cognitive recall (memory), appropriate testing needs to be conducted. Testing for specific learning disabilities may be appropriate. 10. A doctor's prescription pad note or a school plan such as an Individualized Educational Plan (IEP) or 504 Plan is not sufficient documentation in and of itself but can be included as part of a more comprehensive evaluative report. It must be understood that evaluation reports themselves do not automatically qualify a student for registration with Student Disability Services. All of the items listed above must clearly show the presence of a disabling condition and clearly justify the need for reasonable accommodations. After admission to Central Christian College, students who have a disability that may require academic accommodations must submit current disability documentation along with a completed Documentation Review Request to Student Special Services. All information is confidential and will be used only to assist the student. REASONABLE ACCOMMODATIONS A reasonable accommodation is a modification or adjustment to a course, program, service activity or facility. It enables a qualified student with a documented disability an opportunity to attain the same level of performance or to enjoy benefits and privileges as are available to a similarly situated

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student without a disability. The accommodation is not required if it would fundamentally alter the nature of the course, program, service or facility, or if it would result in an undue burden for the institution. Reasonable accommodations will be determined by evaluating the following: • Barriers resulting from interaction between the documented disability and the campus environment. • • • Possible accommodations that might remove the barriers. Whether or not the student has access to the course, program, service, activity or facility without accommodations. Whether or not the essential elements of the course, program, service, activity or facility are compromised by the accommodations

All reasonable accommodations are individualized on the basis of the nature of the disability and the academic environment. Reasonable accommodations that the Office of Student Success Special Services offers the student will be discussed with the student confidentially. Below, is a partial list, but not limited to, potential accommodations that may be recommended. • Auxiliary aids and services • • • • • Note taker, reader, transcriber Texts and tests on tape as available Additional time on test and assignments Flexible assignment schedule Proofreaders

ADDITIONAL DOCUMENTATION REQUIREMENTS
ATTENTION DEFICIT HYPERACTIVE DISORDER (ADHD)

Report from a psychologist or psychiatrist that includes the following: • Clear statement of ADHD with the DSM-IV diagnosis • A description of the symptoms which meet the criteria for the diagnosis • A summary of the assessment procedures and evaluation instruments which were used to make the diagnosis • Information about current prescribed medications used to treat the disability and possible side effects • A description of the functional limitation(s) caused by the disability • Recommendations for reasonable academic accommodations
DEAF AND HARD-OF-HEARING

Report from an audiologist or otolaryngologist that includes the following: • Results of an audiogram showing the degree of hearing loss • The type of hearing loss (conductive or sensorineural) • Whether the hearing loss is temporary or permanent, and if it is stable or progressive • Whether the condition is mitigated by hearing aids or medication • A description of the functional limitation(s) caused by the disability • Recommendations for reasonable academic accommodations

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Adult Student Program Handbook

PHYSICAL DISABILITY AND/OR HEALTH-RELATED IMPAIRMENT

Letter or report from a physician in an appropriate medical specialization that includes the following: • The specific medical condition which causes the disability • Whether the condition is temporary or permanent, and if it is stable or progressive • Information about current prescribed medications used to treat the disability and possible side effects • A description of the functional limitation(s) caused by the disability • Recommendations for reasonable academic accommodations
PSYCHOLOGICAL AND/OR PSYCHIATRIC DISABILITY

Psychological or neuropsychological evaluation or report from a psychiatrist or licensed psychologist: • Clear statement of the condition with the DSM-IV diagnosis • A description of the symptoms which meet the criteria for the diagnosis • A summary of the assessment procedures and evaluation instruments which were used to make the diagnosis • Information about current prescribed medications used to treat the disability and possible side effects • A description of the functional limitation(s) caused by the disability • Recommendations for reasonable academic accommodations
SPECIFIC LEARNING DISABILITIES

A comprehensive psycho-educational assessment from a psychologist or learning disabilities specialist that includes the following: • Clear statement of the specific learning disability with the DSM-IV diagnosis. • A test used to measure intellectual ability, including scores and subtest scores. Acceptable IQ Tests: • Kaufman Adolescent and Adult Intelligence Test • Stanford Binet 4th Edition • Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale - III (WAIS-III) • Woodcock-Johnson III General Intellectual Ability (GIA) Not Acceptable: • Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test (KBIT) • Slosson Intelligence Test • Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI) • Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children - III (WISC-III) Acceptable Achievement Tests: • Nelson-Denny Reading Test • Scholastic Abilities Test for Adults (SATA) • Wechsler Individual Achievement Test - II (WIAT-II) • Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Achievement • Woodcock Reading

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Mastery Tests – Revised

Not Acceptable: • Wide Range Achievement Test - 3 (WRAT-3) • A test used to measure processing ability, including scores and subtest scores Acceptable Processing Tests: • Detroit Tests of Learning Aptitude - Adult • Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities • Profile of academic strengths and weaknesses and how these relate to the academic limitation(s) • Clinical summary • Recommendations for reasonable academic accommodations NOTE: All of these tests must be based on adult norms.
SPEECH IMPAIRMENT

Report or letter from a speech pathologist or physician that includes the following: • The specific disabling condition • Whether the condition is temporary or permanent, and if it is stable or progressive • A description of the functional limitation(s) caused by the disability • Recommendations for reasonable academic accommodations
VISUAL IMPAIRMENT

Report or letter from an ophthalmologist or optometrist that includes the following: • The specific medical condition which causes the visual impairment • The degree of visual acuity, including with corrective lenses • The extent of the visual fields • Whether the condition is temporary or permanent, and if it is stable or progressive • Whether the condition is mitigated by corrective lenses or medication • A description of the functional limitation(s) caused by the disability • Recommendations for reasonable academic accommodations including any visual aids

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