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Unit 1 Case Study 1: Tell Me About Blood

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1. What is the significance of a lower-than-normal hematocrit? What is the effect of a bacterial infection on the hematocrit?
The significance of lower than normal hematocrit is anemia. This can be caused by nutritional deficiency, loss of blood, bone marrow problems, or abnormal hematocrit. The effect of bacterial infection would cause a decrease in hematocrit. 2. Compare the development of lymphocytes with the development of the other formed elements.
Leukocytes are produced or stored in many locations in the body, including the thymus, spleen, and bone marrow. The two kinds of lymphocytes are B lymphocytes and T lymphocytes. Lymphocytes start out in the bone marrow and either stay there to mature into B cells, or they leave for the thymus gland, where they mature into T cells. Other formed elements, such as blood is a mixture of plasma and other substances which are developed through red blood cells or erythrocytes. Thrombocytes or platelets are formed by fragmentation of megakaryocytes in the bone marrow. 3. What is Erythropoiesis? Which factors speed up and slow down erythropoiesis?
Erythropoiesis is the process of red blood cell formation or production which begins in the red bone marrow as a proerythroblast. It then divides several times until it reaches the end of development, ejects the nucleus, and becomes a reticulocyte. These develop into erythrocytes within one or two days after release from the bone marrow. Erythropoiesis slows down when there is a sufficient oxygen-carrying capacity of blood. It speeds up when the oxygen delivery to the kidneys and other body tissues fails. 4. Explain what would happen if a person with type B blood were given a transfusion of type O blood.
If a person with type B blood were given a transfusion of type O blood, there would be no negative effects. Type O blood is the universal donor. This is true because the…...

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