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The Growth and Characterisation of Bacterial Biofilm Underflow.

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MUTATION FREQUENCY OF PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA(MPA01 AND PA1432) ,E.col,CRONOBACTER,in viable count(miles and misra) Planktonic Miles and Misra Date-15/07/2015 MPA01-10-6 PA1432-10-6 E.coli-10-6 CRONOBACTER-10-6 14 16 13 21 16 11 10 20 14 8 16 20 Average 14.66666667 Average 11.66666667 Average 13 Average 20.33333333 1466666667 1166666667 1300000000 2033333330

Date-16/07/2015 TSA+ciprofloxacin TSA+ciprofloxacin TSA+ciprofloxacin TSA+ciprofloxacin MPA01-100µl PA1432-100µl E.coli-25µl CRONOBACTER-25µl 141 42 2 9 167 84 2 7 156 65 4 18 180 24 10 32 124 38 17 17 sum 768 sum 253 sum 35 sum 83 MF 5.23636E-07 MF 2.16857E-07 MF 2.69231E-08 MF 4.08197E-08

MUTATION FREQUENCY OF PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA(MPA01 AND PA1432) ,E.col,CRONOBACTER,in viable count(miles and misra) Planktonic Miles and Misra Date-23/07/2015 MPA01-10-6 PA1432-10-6 E.coli-10-6 CRONOBACTER-10-6 10 15 8 10 12 13 8 19 11 15 16 22 Average 11 Average 14.33333333 Average 10.66666667 Average 17 1100000000 1433333333 1066666667 1700000000 Date-24/07/2015 TSA+Rifampicin TSA+Rifampicin TSA+Rifampicin TSA+Rifampicin 6 5 24hrs-6 48hrs-4 10 24hrs-21 48hrs-15 36 2 10 24hrs-10 48hrs-2 12 24hrs-29 48hrs-17 46 3 8 24hrs-1 48hrs-4 5 24hrs-23 48hrs-13 36 3 12 24hrs-5 48hrs-2 7 24hrs-24 48hrs-15 39 7 11 24hrs-4 48hrs-0 4 24hrs-22 48hrs-10 32 Sum 21 Sum 46 Sum 38 Sum 189 MF 1.90909E-08 MF 3.2093E-08 MF 3.5625E-08 MF 1.11176E-07 Date-24/07/2015 TSA+ciprofloxacin TSA+ciprofloxacin TSA+ciprofloxacin TSA+ciprofloxacin 15 61 7 0 19 72 1 17 19 63 1 25 36 58 0 7 28 64 23 0 Sum 117 Sum 318 Sum 32 Sum 49 MF 1.06364E-07 MF 2.2186E-07 MF 3E-08 MF 2.88235E-08

MUTATION FREQUENCY OF PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA(MPA01 AND PA1432) ,E.col,CRONOBACTER,in viable count(miles and misra) Planktonic Miles and Misra Date-25/07/2015 MPA01-10-6 PA1432-10-6 E.coli-10-6 CRONOBACTER-10-6 20 18 21 24 31 24 9 34 24 22 13 33 Average 25 Average 21.33333333 Average 14.33333333 Average 30.33333333 2500000000 2133333333 1433333333 3033333333 Date-26/07/2015 TSA+Rifampicin TSA+Rifampicin TSA+Rifampicin TSA+Rifampicin 12 17 24hrs-9 48hrs-13 21 24hrs-8 48hrs-5 13 16 19 24hrs-8 48hrs-14 22 24hrs-4 48hrs-4 8 19 16 24hrs-9 48hrs-4 13 24hrs-4 48hrs-4 8 6 18 24hrs-5 48hrs-19 24 24hrs-8 48hrs-5 13 7 Average 17.5 24hrs-6 48hrs-9 15 24hrs-6 48hrs-8 14 Sum 60 87.5 Sum 95 Sum 56 MF 0.000000024 MF 4.10156E-08 MF 6.62791E-08 MF 1.84615E-08 Date-26/07/2015 TSA+ciprofloxacin TSA+ciprofloxacin TSA+ciprofloxacin TSA+ciprofloxacin 196 134 0 5 218 179 1 8 182 176 0 4 246 178 0 1 207 204 5 8 Sum 1049 Sum 871 Sum 6 Sum 26 MF 4.196E-07 MF 4.08281E-07 MF 4.18605E-09 MF 8.57143E-09…...

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