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The Game Shall Always Remain the Same: Hip-Hop from a Protagonist’s Point of View

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The Game Shall Always Remain the Same: Hip-Hop from a Protagonist’s Point of View

The Hip-Hop culture and all it stands for has saturated a generation in an unprecedented way. It has begun to shape and unify a diverse population of people. Hip-Hop, for many, provides an outlet to express your thoughts and for others, Hip-Hop is a lifestyle. The influence of Hip-Hop has become universal. It has transcended from a cultural genre to having a larger audience not made up of solely African Americans. It has gone from the slums, to the suburbs, and into larger corporate rooms. McDonald’s, Addidas, Nike, Coca Cola, Sprite, and other corporate giants have capitalized on this phenomenon. Although critics of Rap music and the Hip-Hop culture seemed to be fixated on the messages of sex, violence, and harsh language Hip- Hop has potential to unify individuals and promote change. This genre of music has transformed generations across the country. Hip- Hop possesses a level of maturity and a sense of cultural belongingness that has become a protest form for people all over the world. The art form, now simply known as Hip- Hop, began with three New Yorkers: Busy Bee Starski, DJ Hollywood, and DJ Afrika Bambaataa; they are credited for creating the term Hip-Hop. It all began in the early 1970’s with house parties and basement beat shaking music in upstate New York. The beats were very melodic, Africanized, and soulful. Hip-Hop is music for Blacks and Latinos who were isolated from the main stream popular music Rock and Roll. It housed several components: Rapping (MC’ing), Break dancing, Graffiti, and Street types of sport games. Black and Latinos celebrate themselves in these different art forms and it has now grown to a world revolution. According to Terri Adams, when the term Rap was first used by African Americans it…...

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