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Swine Ndustries

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Introduction to Agricultural Sector and Swine Industries.

Thailand, one of the major world food supplies, have always been associated with a high concentration of labor in agricultural sector. There is a saying that “farming is not just an occupation, but it is the way of life”, in the case of Thailand, it could not be true. Almost 70 % of the labor force are in agricultural sector, and even though that number is falling for the last decades, agricultural sector is still be the main source of food supplies, and employment.

There are many sub sector within Agricultural, such as; Fishing, Rice, Cassava, Poultry, etc. However, that main emphasis of this report will be focusing on one of the most important share of this sector, naming Swine Industry. The swine industry or the more familiar term, pork industry, are very important source of food supply in Thai society, which play a part in maintaining a low cost of living and ultimately, controlling a reasonable level of inflation. In fact, by the analysis of FAO (Food and Organization of United Nation) “Pork has become the second most important meat in Thai consumption, with average consumption in the late 1990s of about 4.7 kg per person per year”. And because of the upcoming ASEAN community that will be officially formed at the end of this year, the pork industries is expected to expand aggressively. This is because in the past, we mainly produced to meet domestic demand and export some. After becoming he member of WTO, Pig and pork sectors in Thailand improve very rapidly. Since then, The National Bureau of Agricultural Commodity and Food Standards was established, and The Agricultural Standards Act was legislated including Good Agricultural Practice for pig farm. However the path we chose to take is not the bed of roses, export of Thai pigs is very limited due to foot and mouth disease, but…...

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