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Sociology

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Today many people understand that the media can influence us in different ways. Even if we don’t believe what the media say it still shapes the parameters of our experience. Study after study tells us that the media do affect us. Whether we recognize it or not, mediated images not only help to shape our view of the world, but shape our value and actions. Watching movies and programs on the television as we relax takes us away into this different realm—that is, there are parts in our being that feels we are the ones in the movie and sometimes we even feel what they are feeling as we get caught in the emotional excitement. The effect of media does not stop when the movie or program ends. And this lingering effect might just be the cause of behavioral changes in people.
Thus our knowledge of the world becomes a complex blend of personal, interpersonal and mediated experience.

Watching popular TV programs, movies or sitcoms we tend unconsciously to copy some life style images and bring it to our way of life.

Imagistic advertising is qualitatively different from nonimagistic ad, because rather than lead us to rationally evaluate the price and quality of a particular product it focuses on our emotions and conscious and underconscious desire. Imagistic advertising compels us to organize our world and place value via commercial culture products.

Silently we observe and order our lives using fashion. We come to understand who we are in the same way we come to understand the commercial products at hand. Commercial products help us identify and create interpersonal bonds and groups of solidarity, and define who we are and to which group we belong.

After reviewing a number of different films about happy life, or about the military exploits of heroes, a man begins to build his life as he had seen in the movies: people wear similar clothes, change plan of the apartment, appropriate elements of movements, facial expressions, etc. People are trying to copy what they saw.

Most ironically in modern consumer society that buying new thing is portrayed as the solution of personal anxiety or discomfort. This is especially true when people are advised to go shopping from therapeutic point of view.
New media
The impact can be mediated through new technologies which mixes elements of one-to-many information flow and many-to-many cooperative dialogue. Thus we get the notion of ‘new media’.
New media refers to on-demand access to content any time, anywhere, on any digital device, as well as interactive user feedback, creative participation. Another aspect of new media is the real-time generation of new, unregulated content

The new media technologies include the Internet, multi-media, portals, mobile phones, gaming & animation and many others.
The rise of new media has increased communication between people all over the world and the Internet. It has allowed people to express themselves through blogs, websites, pictures, and other user-generated media.
New media does not include television programs, feature films, magazines, books, or paper-based publications – unless they contain technologies that enable digital interactivity.[2] Wikipedia, an online encyclopedia, is an example, combining Internet accessible digital text, images and video with web-links, creative participation of contributors, interactive feedback of users and formation of a participant community of editors and donors for the benefit of non-community readers. Facebook is an example of the social media model, in which most users are also participants.
Today, we can trace sort of dependence on the internet and all the devices providing Internet access. The main thing is that New technologies have a far greater impact on society. While the TV was just a means of leisure and entertainment Internet technologies have penetrated almost in all spheres of human life and cover work, study, play. Today, 8-18 year-olds devote an average of 7 hours and 38 minutes (7:38) to using entertainment media in a typical day (more than 53 hours a week) – about the same amount most adults spend at work per day. People spend more time on their phones, while in the presence of other people than spending time with the people in the same room. [34]
Audience reception
During the 1980s and 1990s Audience reception theory has come to be widely used as a way of characterizing the wave of audience research which occurred within communications and cultural studies.
Reception theory emphasizes the reader's reception of a literary text or media. This approach to textual analysis focuses on the scope for negotiation and opposition on the part of the audience. This means that a "text"—be it a book, movie, or other creative work—is not simply passively accepted by the audience, but that the reader / viewer interprets the meanings of the text based on their individual cultural background and life experiences. The most widely spread theory is the theory of coding and decoding, the theory of audience reception of media messages, developed by Stuart Hall.

Encoding: The act of producing the message. Examples: writing, speaking, making a gesture

Decoding: The act of understanding the message. Examples: reading, listening, deciphering a gesture

Producers encode specific meanings into text to say and try to make meaning understood.

The meanings and messages are not simply transmitted: they are always produced, first by the encoder, and second by the audience.

Hall's Encoding and Decoding model of communication states that:

-the meaning of the message isn't determined by the sender

-the encoder's message isn't transparent

-the decoder doesn't receive the message passively ( Hall, 1980)

According to the theory, the audience (viewers) can have three different reactions to the text (message) media perceived by people through different channels (TV, radio, newspapers etc.):

The dominant or desired reaction (born Dominant, or Preferred, Reading) - the reaction which director / creator of mediatext prefers the audience to percept it; Oppositional reading (English Opposition Reading) - when the audience rejects the content in the way preferred by director / creator and creates its own opinion; A consistent interpretation (English Negotiated Reading) - a compromise between the dominant and oppositional reading, when the public partially perceives thoughts of director, but in part has its own views on the text.

Geographic and demographic factors affect the image of how the audience read the messages, as well as its personal mood.
It means that if there is some dominance idea in the media message it is not always perceived by audience in the way it is supposed to be received. There is always some part of society which because of its special vision of life can still make their own conclusions and make their own opinion.

Postmodernism
New technologies combined with strong influence of commercialized media and culture industry bring the society to a new step of “development” such as postmodernism. We have moved from modern to postmodern. ‘The modern world was well-organized along the history the postmodern world is poorly organized with the absence of a clear, predictable historical future’
Theoretically while the Frankfurt school emphasized that the media replace reality with illusion, postmodernist take this notion one step further and argue that @There is no clear distinction between reality and illusion anymore.@
Reality has given the way to simulation of reality or “hyper-reality”.
Hyperreality is a way of characterizing what our consiousness defines as "real" in a world where a multitude of media can radically shape and filter an original event or experience. Hyperreality is seen as a condition in which what is real and what is fiction are seamlessly blended together so that there is no clear distinction between where one ends and the other begins.
In film industry we have docudramas instead of documentaries which are roughly based on a true story, which seamlessly combine well-known historical truth with fiction. (Titanic)
In recent years there is a shift from fictional shows to shows which simulates reality and try to assure us that they are not scripted. For instance real-live shows such as Big brother, Survival, which blend elements of new media with traditional game show by bringing together strangers to live in a house or in island.
The most exact example are MTV reality tv shows. Dates with mot
Conclusions
1) The media ritual events reaffirm shared meaning and community, which provide a cultural space in which complex social issues are displayed and sorted out. 2) Recent technologies have potential to create entirely new types of community (virtual communities) with the rise of global culture. 3) The media is sophisticated well-financed industry that creates and conditions the interpretation of a limited array of manufactured entertainment goods. 4) Global culture is successful marketing campaign wiping out individuality, self-expression and freedom 5) There is two main responses to mass culture theory: audience/reception studies and postmodernism. Audience reception researches demonstrate that individuals read and view texts in creative ways-often unanticipated by culture producers. Postmodernists take a different approach and assert that there is no reality anymore: reality has given way to simulation of reality, or “hyperreality”. Our current condition is one of simulation. In all dimensions of our social and cultural life , the simulated experience has come to be preferred to the “real”.…...

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