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Running head: COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT

Community Assessment: Orlando, Florida
Ann A. Student, Be A. Student and, R. U. A. Student
University of Central Florida

1

COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT

2

SECTION I: Community Structure
A. Name of Community: Orlando
B. Map & Identification of Geographic Boundaries: Orlando has several city that border it including Ocoee to the West, Winter Park and Altamonte Springs to the North, Titusville to the
East, and Saint Cloud to the South.

C. Historical Evolution of the Community:









Orlando can be dated as far back as 1836 during the Seminole War where new settlers fought to gain the territory against the Seminole Indians. There are differing stories about where the name Orlando came from but one of the most popular ones involved a man named Orlando Reeves who died during a sneak attack from the Indians.
After the Civil War there was a population explosion which lead to the city being incorporated. Orlando was known as Florida’s citrus hub between the years 1875-1895.
The city started to become a major tourist destination between the Spanish-American
War and World War I.
During World War II, Pine Castle AAF (now known at McCoy Air Force Base) brought many new residents to the state.
In 1956 the aerospace defense company, Martin Marietta (now known as Lockheed
Martin) opened a plant in the city which helped lead to many other high tech companies establishing business and plants in the city as well.
In 1971 Walt Disney World opened which caused population and economic growth.

Sources of evidence:

COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT

3

Bing.com Images (2013). Retrieved from http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=City+Of+Orlando+Boundary+Map&FORM=RESTAB# on March 20, 2013.
Roadside Thoughts (2012). Retrieved from http://www.roadsidethoughts.com/fl/orlandonearby.htm on March 20, 2013.
Explore Orlando Florida (2012). Retrieved from http://exploreorlandoflorida.com/Orlando_History.html on March 20, 2013.
D. Housing Conditions







Housing characteristics: Housing greatly varies in the city, ranging from millions dollar homes to homes valued below $50,000.
Total number of units (2010): 121,254
Owner occupied (2007-2010): 40.6%
Renter occupied: 47,913
Vacant (Orange County): 14%
Housing subsidies/homeless provisions: “During FY 2006, the HSN administered the area’s HUD Supportive Housing monies (SHP) funding to cover a wide array of homeless issues, such as outreach, transitional housing, supportive services, permanent housing, and permanent supportive housing.”

Sources of evidence:
CityofOrlando.net (2013). Retrieved from http://www.cityoforlando.net/housing/pdf/2006%20CAPER%20-%20FINAL.pdf on March 20,
2013.
CNNMoney.com (2013). Retrieved from http://money.cnn.com/2011/03/18/real_estate/florida_vacant_homes/index.htm on March 20,
2013.
InfoPlease (2013). Retrieved from http://www.infoplease.com/us/census/data/florida/orlando/housing.html on March 20, 2013.
U.S. Census Bureau (2013). Retrieved from http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/12/1253000.html on March 20, 2013.
E. Educational Facilities


Number of elementary schools: 127 including public, religious and secular (unable to determine how many of each type)

COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT




Number of middle schools: 30 including public, religious and secular (unable to determine how many of each type)
Number of high schools: 25 including public, religious and secular (unable to determine how many of each type)
Number of college/universities: 18 including public, religious and secular (unable to determine how many of each type)

Sources of evidence:
City-data.com (2012). Retrieved from http://www.city-data.com/city/Orlando-Florida.html on
March 20, 2013
F. Places of Worship





4

Denominations:
1. Catholic Church-33%
2. Southern Baptist-20%
3. United Methodist-8%
4. Assemblies of God-6%
5. Other-32%
Percentage of population affiliated with a religious congregation: 40.25%
Examples of Services Provided to Parishioners & Community:
1. The Orlando Community Church aids the Coalition for the Homeless of Central
Florida
2. First Baptist Church of Orlando has many community outreach programs. One example is their Celebrate Recovery program which helps to support individuals with addiction. Another great program they provide is the Center for Pregnancy which provides many free services for pregnant women.
3. Blessed Trinity Catholic Church provides a meeting space of Alcoholic
Anonymous. They also do quarterly blood drives to benefit Central Florida.

Sources of evidence:
BlessedTrinityOrlando.org (2012). Retrieved from http://www.blessedtrinityorlando.org/102 on
March 20, 2013.
City-data.com (2012). Retrieved from http://www.city-data.com/city/Orlando-Florida.html on
March 20, 2013
FirstOrlando.com. Retrieved from http://www.firstorlando.com/Ministries.aspx on March 20,
2013.

COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT
OrlandoCommunityChurch.org (2013). Retrieved from http://www.orlandocommunitychurch.org/ministry-partners on March 20, 2013.

G. Leading Industries in the Community


Type of Industries:
1. Accommodation and Food Service-12.6%
2. Construction-6.6%
3. Arts, Entertainment and Receration-7.6%
4. Professional, Scientific and Technical Services-7.2%
5. Administrative and Support-5.4%
6. Finance and Insurance-4.8%
7. Healthcare-7%
8. Educational Services-5.5%
9. Public Administration-3.4%
10. Real Estate-3.3%

Sources of evidence:
City-Data.com (2012). Retrieved from http://www.city-data.com/work/work-OrlandoFlorida.html on March 20, 2013.

H. Transportation






Major Roads and Highways:
1. Interstate 4
2. 408 Expressway
3. Florida Turnpike
4. Highway 50
Minor Roads:
1. Orange Ave
2. Mills Ave
3. Church St
4. Silver Star Road
Airports:
1. Orlando International Airport- Runways: 5, Commercial Ops: 291,400, Air Taxi
Ops: 53,678, Itinerant Ops: 23,326, Local Ops: 16, Military Ops: 486
2. Executive Airport- Runways: 2, Air Taxi Ops: 11,624, Itinerant Ops: 150,769,
Local Ops: 55,090, Military Ops: 679
3. Rybolt Ranch Airport- Runways:2, Heliports:13

5

COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT







6

4. Lake Conway North Seaplane Base
5. Lake Hiawassee Seaplane Base
Train:
1. Amtrak Station
Bus Service:
1. Lynx Bus
2. Orlando Bus Inc.
Taxi Service:
1. Airport Taxi Cab and Shuttle
2. Yellow Taxi Transport Service
3. Statewide Taxi
4. AAA Transportation and Limo Inc.
Bike Paths:
1. Cady Way Trail
2. Little Econ Greenway
3. Tibet-Butler Preserve

Sources of evidence:
Bing.com (2013). Retrieved from http://www.bing.com/search?q=Taxi+services+in+orlando&form=ASUTDF&pc=MAAU&src=I E-SearchBox on March 20, 2013.
City-Data.com (2012). Retrieved from http://www.city-data.com/city/Orlando-Florida.html on
March 20, 2013.
OrangeCountyFL.net (2013). Retrieved from http://www.orangecountyfl.net/CultureParks/Trails.aspx on March 20, 2013
I. Library Services






Orlando Public Libraryo 101 E. Central Blvd o 407.835.7323 o Services downtown Orlando o One of the largest public libraries in Florida offering a wide variety of rare books.
Herndon Branch Library o 4324 E. Colonial Drive o 407.2281410 o Services East Orlando o Medium sized library with a smaller children’s section.
Edgewater Branch Library

COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT o o o o

7

5049 Edgewater Drive
407.296.5153
Services West Orlando
Opened in 1950, now offers internet classes to the public

Sources of evidence:
Bing.com (2013). Retrieved from http://www.bing.com/search?q=orlando+florida+libraries&FORM=AWRE on March 22, 2013.
Bing.com (2013). Retrived from http://www.bing.com/local/details.aspx?lid=YN873x113645876&qt=yp&what=libraries&where =Orlando%2c+Florida&s_cid=ansPhBkYp02&mkt=enus&q=orlando+florida+libraries&FORM=LARE on March 22, 2013.
Bing.com (2013). Retrieved from http://www.bing.com/local/details.aspx?lid=YN184x3515433&qt=yp&what=libraries&where=O rlando%2c+Florida&s_cid=ansPhBkYp02&mkt=enus&q=orlando+florida+libraries&FORM=LARE on March 22, 2013.
OCLS.info. Retrieved from http://www.ocls.info/Locations/Edgewater/edgewater.asp on March
22, 2013.
J. Communication









Television:
1. WFTV-based in Orlando, FL; community based
2. Golf Channel-based in Orlando, FL; national
3. WESH-based in Daytona Beach; commuity based
Radio:
1. WMMO FM radio-based in Orlando; community based
2. WXXL FM radio- based in Tavares; community based but also has national coverage 3. WDBO AM radio- based in Orlando; community based
Newspaper:
1. The Orlando Sentinel-daily newspaper offering door side delivery or access online 2. Orlando Weekly-weekly newsletter offering information on what is going on around town such as festivals or new restaurant openings
Internet:
1. Facebook-City of Orlando Facebook page
2. Twitter- @citybeautiful twitter handle
Disaster Notification:
1. City of Orlando webpage-Emergency Management Department

COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT
2. Facebook updates
Sources of evidence:

City-Data.com (2012). Retrieved from http://www.city-data.com/city/Orlando-Florida.html on
March 22, 2013.
Bing.com (2013) Retrieved from http://www.bing.com/search?q=Orlando+newspapers&form=ASUTDF&pc=MAAU&src=IESearchBox on March 22, 2013.
Facebook.com (2013). Retrieved from http://www.facebook.com/cityoforlando on March 22,
2013.
OrlandoSentinel.com (2013). Retrieved from http://www.orlandosentinel.com/ on March 22,
2013.
OrlandoWeekly.com (2013). Retrieved from http://orlandoweekly.com/ on March 22, 2013
Twitter.com (2013). Retrieved from http://twitter.com/citybeautiful on March 22, 2013.

K. Availability of Merchandise & Food Commodities




Food availability-no deficiencies noted in availability
1. Grocery stores-230
2. Supercenters/Club Stores-16
3. Convenience Stores -487
4. Full Service Resturants-881
Merchandise-several large malls, outlet malls, and strip malls are available throughout the city with merchandise of all kinds. Again, no deficiencies are noted. Sources of evidence:
City-Data.com (2012). Retrieved from http://www.city-data.com/city/Orlando-Florida.html on
March 22, 2013.

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COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT

9

L. Evidence of Cultural Activities/Influences in the Community





African-American Art: Harlem Renaissance, Civil Rights Era and Beyond o Features works by 43 black artists who lived through the tremendous changes of the 20th century.
Sewn Together o “ Exhibition of photographic quilts reflecting the family ties of Eatonville,
Maitland and Winter Park.”
Moonlight Carillon Concert o Concert under the moon light
Florida Film Festival o “Features movies that have the power to transport viewers to places beyond their wildest imaginations - to take them inside a different world and open their eyes to new ideas.”

Sources of evidence:
VisitOrlando.com (2013). Retrieved from http://www.visitorlando.com/events/cultural-events/ on March 22, 2013.

SECTION II: Population Statistics
A. Population

Orlando
Population at last census
Population density
Population changes in last
10 years
Housing for seasonal use
Sources of evidence:

Orange
County

Florida

238,300
1,145,956
2527.3/ square 1266/ square mile mile

18,801,310

52,349

249,612

2,818,932

1,942

13,633

657,070

351/ square mile

E-Republic, Inc. (2011). Population density for cities, urban areas. Retrieved from http://www.governing.com/gov-data/population-density-census-data-map.html Onboard Informatics. (2012). Orange county, Florida (FL). Retrieved from http://www.citydata.com/county/Orange_County-FL.html

COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT

10

U.S. Census Bureau. (2010). 2010 Demographic profile. Retrieved from http://www.census.gov/popfinder/ U.S. Census Bureau. (2010). Profile of general population and housing characteristics: 2010.
Retrieved from http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=DEC_10_DP_ DPDP1
U.S. Census Bureau. (2010). Population distribution and change: 2000 to 2010. Retrieved from http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/briefs/c2010br-01.pdf
The Florida Legislature, Office of Economic and Demographic Research. (2012). 2010 Census data. Retrieved from http://edr.state.fl.us/Content/population-demographics/2010census/data/index.cfm
Williams, D. & Maines, J. (2009). Census 2010 database: Florida’s changing communities.
Retrieved from U.S. Census Bureau website: http://databases.sunsentinel.com/news/broward/flacensus2010/flacensus2010_view.php?editid1=1

B. Age
Years (include years as per
Orlando
data)
Under 5 years
# 17,364
5-9
13,815
10-14
14,329
15-19
12,484
20-24
25,682
25-34
44,433
35-44
32,359
45-54
33,572
55-59
12,527
60-64
10,802
65-74
12,821
75-84
9,469
85 years and over 3,552
Sources of evidence:

Orange County
7.1%
5.7
5.9
5.1
10.6
18.3
13.3
13.8
5.2
4.4
5.3
3.9
1.5

#75,165
75,544
75,360
84,938
108,644
183,246
165,928
163,589
68,751
51,994
65,696
35,795
14,457

6.4%
6.5
6.4
7.3
9.3
15.7
14.2
14.0
5.9
4.4
5.6
3.1
1.2

Florida
#1,074,324
1,085,959
1,126,994
1,219,318
1,283,366
2,328,282
2,408,924
2,739,211
1,253,012
1,178,757
1,777,707
1,120,268
461,420

5.6%
5.7
5.9
6.4
6.7
12.2
12.6
14.4
6.6
6.2
9.3
5.9
2.4

COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT

11

U.S. Census Bureau. (2011). ACS demographic and housing estimates: 2011 American community survey 1-year estimates. Retrieved from http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_11_1Y R_DP05&prodType=table
C. Race
Years (include years as per
Orlando
data)
Total Population #243,209
One Race
237,818
White
139,908
Black or African
68,298
American
American Indian
453
and Alaska Native
Asian
11,372
Native Hawaiian and other Pacific
0
Islander
Some other race
17,787
Two or more
5,391
races
Sources of evidence:

Orange County

Florida

100%
97.8
57.5

#1,169,107
1,139,960
765,820

100%
97.5
65.5

#19,057,542
18,634,061
14,535,897

100%
97.8
76.3

28.1

239,598

20.5

3,046,628

16.0

0.2

3,790

0.3

63,416

0.3

4.7

59,748

5.1

463,164

2.4

0

1,588

0.1

12,545

0.1

7.3

69,416

5.9

512,411

2.7

2.2

29,147

2.5

423,481

2.2

U.S. Census Bureau. (2011). ACS demographic and housing estimates: 2011 American community survey 1-year estimates. Retrieved from http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_11_1Y R_DP05&prodType=table
D. Gender
Years
(include
Orlando
years as per data) Male
#115,883
population
Under 5 years 8,809
5-9
7,352
10-14
6,625

Orange County

Florida

%

#564,326

49.2%

#9,189,355

48.9%

7.1
3.1
2.8

38,130
27,440
38,221

3.3
3.3
3.3

547,985
551,053
578,689

2.9
2.9
3.1

COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT
15-19
6,817
20-24
9,848
25-29
12,947
30-34
11,187
35-39
9,671
40-44
8,677
45-49
8,208
50-54
6,924
55-59
5,591
60-64
4,363
65-69
2,934
70-74
2,105
75-79
1,714
80-84
1,144
85 years and
967
over
Sources of evidence:

12
2.9
4.1
5.4
4.7
4.1
3.6
3.4
2.9
2.3
1.8
1.2
0.9
0.7
0.5

44,855
53,541
47,142
41,733
40,853
40,995
42,407
37,430
29,938
24,203
16,561
11,777
8,798
5,834

4.9
4.7
4.1
3.6
3.6
3.6
3.7
3.3
2.6
2.1
1.4
1.0
0.8
0.5

631,287
627,063
594,897
555,239
585,141
623,330
691,335
650,033
569,009
533,868
448,193
357,908
280,087
205,925

3.4
3.3
3.2
3.0
3.1
3.3
3.7
3.5
3.0
2.8
2.4
1.9
1.5
1.1

0.4

4,468

0.4

158,313

0.8

U.S. Census Bureau. (2010). Profile of general population and housing characteristics 2010:
2010 demographic profile data. Retrieved from http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=DEC_ Years (include years as per data)
Female
Population
Under 5 years
5-9
10-14
15-19
20-24
25-29
30-34
35-39
40-44
45-49
50-54
55-59
60-64
65-69
70-74
75-79
80-84

Orlando
#122,417
8,076
7,068
6,375
6,898
11,098
13,911
10,931
9,523
8,118
8,039
7,438
6,263
5,135
3,734
2,895
2,540
2,171

Orange County
51.4%
3.4
3.0
2.7
2.9
4.7
5.8
4.6
4.0
3.4
3.4
3.1
2.6
2.2
1.6
1.2
1.1
0.9

Florida

#581,630

50.8%

#9,611,955

51.1%

36,055
36,314
36,754
43,512
52,280
46,417
41,825
41,716
40,904
42,885
39,337
33,091
27,059
19,244
14,429
11,617
9,143

3.1
3.2
3.2
3.8
4.6
4.1
3.6
3.6
3.6
3.7
3.4
2.9
2.4
1.7
1.3
1.0
0.8

525,521
529,202
552,158
597,095
601,695
584,330
555,079
593,326
629,457
709,867
690,258
633,409
601,382
511,040
410,799
335,427
276,098

2.8
2.8
2.9
3.2
3.2
3.1
3.0
3.2
3.3
3.8
3.7
3.4
3.2
2.7
2.2
1.8
1.5

COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT

13

85 years and over
2,204
Sources of evidence:

0.9

9,048

0.8

275,812

1.5

U.S. Census Bureau. (2010). Profile of general population and housing characteristics 2010:
2010 demographic profile data. Retrieved from http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=DEC_10_DP_ DPDP1&prodType=table s.
E. Employment
(16 years and older)

Number in Orlando

Employed Persons
Unemployed Persons
Sources of evidence:

139,289
55,443

Number in
Orange County
635,376
293,601

Number in Florida
9,300,255
6,245,257

U.S. Census Bureau. (2007-2011). Selected economic statistics. Retrieved from http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_11_1Y R_DP03&prodType=table
F. Family Income (Percent of population)

(Total households)
Less than $10,000
$10,000 to 14,999
$15,000 to 24,999
$25,000 to 34,999
$35,000 to 49,999
$50,000 to 74,999
$75,000 to 99,999
$100,000 to
149,999
$150,000 to
199,999
$200,000 or more
Sources of evidence:

2,803
2,820
6,400
6,705
8,772
10,308
5,376

Orange
County
(415,350)
32,405
24,674
55,192
53,895
62,369
77,002
43,485

5,025

37,193

689,939

2,089

14,064

235,660

2,372

15,071

235,695

Orlando
(98,067)

Florida
(7,106,283)
593,446
447,984
928,685
868,318
1,076,024
1,283,849
746,683

U.S. Census Bureau. (2007-2011). Selected economic statistics. Retrieved from http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_11_1Y R_DP03&prodType=table

COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT

14

G. Educational Level of People Over 25 Years of Age (Percent of population)
Number in
Orlando
(155,968)
7,929
40,822
30,318

Number in Orange
County
(720,983)
37,769
196,289
142,235

Number in
Florida
(12,949,216)
734,857
3,897,573
2,701,585

47,999

217,897

3,282,874

16,055
High school degree (24.5%)

69,965
High school degree
(81.8%)

1,195,547
High school degree
(28.7%)

(of population 25 years and older) 9th grade & below
High school graduate
Some college
College graduate (Associate
&/or Baccalaureate
Masters graduate or above
Median number of years completed Sources of evidence:

Onboard Informatics. (2012). Orange county, Florida (FL). Retrieved from http://www.citydata.com/county/Orange_County-FL.html
Onboard Informatics. (2012). Orlando, Florida. Retrieved from http://www.citydata.com/city/Orlando-Florida.html
Smith, E. J. & Holcombe, W. N. (2011). Benefits of educational attainment in Florida. Zoom
(2011-2), p. 1-7. Retrieved from http://www.fldoe.org/fcs/osas/evaluations/pdf/Zoom201102.pdf
U.S. Census Bureau. (2007-2011). Selected social characteristics in the United States.
Retrieved from http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?fpt=table World Media Group. (2013). Orange county population and races. Retrieved from http://www.usa.com/orange-county-fl-population-and-races.htm H. Marital Status/Family Structure Distribution
Marital
Status/Family
Structure
15 years and over
Never Married
Now married, except separated

Orlando

Orange County

Florida

Male
93,597
43,203

Female
99,124
37,850

Male
445,049
182,592

Female
465,559
152,951

Male
7,461,275
2,480,094

Female
7,944,851
2,054,933

35,588

34,505

205,752

203,847

3,771,539

3,689,056

COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT
Separated
3,186
Widowed
2,135
Divorced
9,485
Sources of evidence:

15
4,141
7,387
15,232

9,747
7,972
38,986

15,170
33,168
60,423

154,260
231,570
823,812

222,570
867,663
1,110,639

U.S. Census Bureau. (2007-2011). Selected social characteristics in the United States.
Retrieved from http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?fpt=table I. Vital Statistics
Years
July 1, 2010- July
1, 2011
Live births
General Deaths

Orlando-KissimmeeSanford (FL metro area) 26,060

Florida

14,981

213,292

6,584

14,503

Orange County

171,257

Sources of evidence:
U.S. Census Bureau. (2012). Estimates of components of resident population change: April 1,
2010 to July 1, 2011. Retrieved from http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=PEP_2011_P EPTCOMP&prodType=table
J. Communicable Diseases (Top 10)
Orange County: 2011
Disease
Enteric disease in children under 6 years Enteric disease cases in day care centers Salmonellosis
Shigellosis
Enteric disease cases in outbreaks
Campylobacteriosis
Giardiasis
Cryptosporidiosis
All E-coli
Hep A

Percentage
318.5
117.0
25.2
22.5
15.9
7.2
5.9
0.9
0.7
0.2

COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT

16

Sources of evidence:
Florida Department of Health, Bureau of Epidemiology. (2013). Campylobacteriosis.
Retrieved from http://www.floridacharts.com/charts/OtherIndicators/NonVitalIndNoGrpDataViewer.aspx?cid=0 202
Florida Department of Health. (2013). Communicable diseases. Retrieved from http://www.floridacharts.com/charts/CommunicableDiseases/ Florida Department of Health, Bureau of Epidemiology. (2013). Cryptosporidiosis. Retrieved from http://www.floridacharts.com/charts/OtherIndicators/NonVitalIndNoGrpDataViewer.aspx?cid=0
195
Florida Department of Health, Bureau of Epidemiology. (2013). All e.coli. Retrieved from http://www.floridacharts.com/charts/OtherIndicators/NonVitalIndNoGrpDataViewer.aspx?cid=0 205
Florida Department of Health, Bureau of Epidemiology. (2013). Enteric disease cases in children under 6. Retrieved from http://www.floridacharts.com/charts/OtherIndicators/NonVitalIndNoGrpDataViewer.aspx?cid=0 130
Florida Department of Health, Bureau of Epidemiology. (2013). Enteric disease cases in day care centers. Retrieved from http://www.floridacharts.com/charts/OtherIndicators/NonVitalIndNoGrpDataViewer.aspx?cid=0 136
Florida Department of Health, Bureau of Epidemiology. (2013). Enteric disease cases in outbreaks. Retrieved from http://www.floridacharts.com/charts/OtherIndicators/NonVitalIndNoGrpDataViewer.aspx?cid=0 127
Florida Department of Health, Bureau of Epidemiology. (2013). Giardiasis. Retrieved from http://www.floridacharts.com/charts/OtherIndicators/NonVitalIndNoGrpDataViewer.aspx?cid=0 173
Florida Department of Health, Bureau of Epidemiology. (2013). Hepatitis A cases. Retrieved from http://www.floridacharts.com/charts/OtherIndicators/NonVitalIndNoGrpDataViewer.aspx?cid=0
154

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17

Florida Department of Health, Bureau of Epidemiology. (2013). Salmonellosis. Retrieved from http://www.floridacharts.com/charts/OtherIndicators/NonVitalIndNoGrpDataViewer.aspx?cid=0 212
Florida Department of Health, Bureau of Epidemiology. (2013). Shigellosis. Retrieved from http://www.floridacharts.com/charts/OtherIndicators/NonVitalIndNoGrpDataViewer.aspx?cid=0 222
K. Leading Causes of Death
Disease
Heart Disease
Cancer
Chronic Lower Respiratory disease
Stroke
Accidents
Sources of evidence:

Percentage
41,274
40,932
10,182
8,395
8,746

National Vital Statistics Reports. (2009). Florida fact sheet (Vol. 59, No. 10, Table 19).
Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/states/FL_2012.pdf

SECTION III: Environmental Health & Safety
A. Sanitation
a. Water Supply & quality: The City of Orlando gets its water from the Floridian aquifer. “The Orange County Utilities Water Division monitors for more than 150 substances in the drinking water supply” (Orange county utilities, 2012). The City of Orlando has 3 waste water treatment plants that produce reclaimed water.
“Reclaimed water is highly treated wastewater which can be used for a variety of uses. Most common uses for reclaimed water in Orlando are irrigation of green space such as golf courses, apartment complexes, medians, schools, and parks.
Each plant has different methods in their reuse of reclaimed water”( Waste water division, )
b. Sewage disposal: The City of Orlando uses the Private Sewer System
Management Program to dispose of sewage. The city of Orlando recently implemented a Grease Management Plan- which they are hoping will prevent sewage system overflows into storm-water systems and lakes, since the discharge grease and oil into the wastewater systems is the primary cause of sewage system overflows. Residents can request additional information from the Environmental
Control Section at (407) 246-2664.

COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT

18

c. Solid waste disposal: Residential garbage is picked up twice a week based on a color coded map. The city provides residents with a garbage can that is the only one to be used with their new automotive trucks. Residents can call the Orange
County Solid Waste Hotline at (407-836-6601) for more detailed information regarding the disposal of their solid waste.
d. Provisions or laws for recycling: Orlando has a “Solid Waste Team” that is implementing a new single cart recycling program for Orlando’s residents. If residents want to participate in the program, they can request a new 95 gallon cart instead of their former two bins. They provide a list of recyclable and nonrecyclable items here: http://www.cityoforlando.net/public_works/solidwaste/documents/singlestreamre cyclingsticker.pdf
e. Vector control programs for applicable insects/rodents/animals: Orange
County Vector Control District is dedicated to controlling mosquitoes, rats, Red
Imported Fire Ants, and flies. Provides county-wide surveillance programs for vector-borne diseases and responds to almost 20,000 citizen requests per year.
Sources of evidence:
Orange County Government Florida. (2012). Orange county utilities annual drinking water report. Retrieved from http://www.orangecountyfl.net/Portals/0/Library/Water-GarbageRecycle/docs/DrinkingWaterReport2012.pdf
Orange County Vector Control District.(n.d.). District info. Retrieved from http://www.ocvcd.org/contactUs.php Solid waste. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.cityoforlando.net/public_works/solidwaste/index.htm B. Recreational and Entertainment Opportunities
a. Parks: The City of Orlando has over 75 public parks, a comprehensive list with links can be found here: http://www.cityoforlando.net/fpr/Html/Parks/index.htm.
i. Lake Eola Park- located at 195 Rosalind Ave is open from 6am-12am and is a public park with a walking loop, lake, and an amphitheater.
Visitors can rent paddle boats at $15/hr. This park is also available to be rented for weddings. ii. Eagles Nest Park- is a 485 acre park located at 5165 Metrowest Blvd and is open from 6 am – 11 pm. Facilities include; baseball and soccer fields, trails with supporting restroom/concessions facilities, lighting and parking.
Rentals are available.

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19

iii. Ivey Lane Park- is located at 291 Silverton Street and is one of the newest city parks. Facilities include; Amphitheatre, pavilions, playground, Tot Lot, softball field, basketball courts, multipurpose field, barbecue grills, drinking fountain and parking
b. Entertainment/Sports Venues:
i. Amway Center: opened in the fall of 2010 and has a capacity of 20,000 seats. The Amway is home to the Orlando Magic and also the Orlando
Predators and the Orlando Solar Bears. The Amway also hosts many concerts, shows, events throughout the year. ii. Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre: has a seating capacity of 2,518 and is a venue for concerts, Broadway presentations, symphonies, Ballets and
Operas.
iii. Florida Citrus Bowl: is the largest of Orlando’s venues and has a seating capacity of 70,000. The Florida Citrus bowl hosts many live sporting events as well as concerts and is a great asset to the City of Orlando.
c. Special Festivals:
i. Orlando Film Festival- an independent film festival whose mission is to support the cause of independent cinema and to promote culture and the arts in Downtown Orlando by exposing a wide audience to the unique and diverse stories told by independent filmmakers from around the world.
October 16-19th 2013 ii. Orlando International Fringe Festival: is a “13-day-festival that is founded on the concept of offering 100% unjuried, 100% uncensored,
100% accessible theatre, music, dance, and art to all types and ages where
100% of the box office ticket sales go directly back to the artists within
The Fringe” (What’s the fringe, n.d.). The Orlando International Fringe
Festival is happening this year on May 15-May 28th.
Sources of evidence:
Bob carr performing arts centre. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.orlandovenues.net/other_info_files/bob_carr_centre.php Eagles nest park. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.cityoforlando.net/fpr/Html/Parks/EagleNest.htm Florida citrus bowl. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.orlandovenues.net/other_info_files/citrus_bowl.php COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT

20

Ivey lane park. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.cityoforlando.net/fpr/Html/Parks/IveyLane.htm Lake eola park.(n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.cityoforlando.net/fpr/Html/Parks/lakeeola.htm
About. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://orlandofilmfest.com/about/
Venue information.(n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.amwaycenter.com/venue-information
What's the fringe. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://orlandofringe.org/what/history/

C. Law Enforcement
a. Police force: Orlando Police Patrol Services Bureau includes over 700 sworn men and women.
b. Special Services:
i. Traffic Enforcement Section.
1. Traffic Homicide Unit is comprised of one sergeant and four detectives, these officers investigate all fatal crashes as well as hit and run crashes that occur within the city limits of Orlando.
2. Motorcycle Unit is comprised of 35 officers and their primary enforcement emphasis is on neighborhood traffic complaints.
These officers are also responsible for traffic control at over 400 special events occurring in the city each year. ii. Mounted Horse Patrol: includes 8 horses with 6 full-time officers and one sergeant iii. The Orlando Police Marine Patrol Unit: patrols the fresh water lakes in the city iv. Airport Division: consists of 72 officers
v. Bike unit: includes 9 separate squads with 78 bicycles vi. K-9 unit: consists of 10 full service dog teams that are trained to find people and evidence. Six of these teams are trained to detect narcotics and
4 are trained to detect explosives vii. Gang intervention unit: investigates criminal gang activity viii. SWAT team ix. International Drive Unit: patrols the tourist areas consisting of approximately 25 hotel/motel properties, Universal Studios, Florida, WetN-Wild Water Park, and numerous other tourist related businesses.
c. Neighborhood Watch: serve as the extra ‘eyes and ears’ for the law enforcement. Residents can form their own neighborhood watch programs and are required to hold meetings twice a year. For more information on the
Neighborhood Watch Unit, call (407) 246-2369

COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT

21

d. Private Security: Residents can contact the Orlando Police Crime Prevention
Division at 246-2461 and Crime Prevention Officers will conduct a Home
Security Survey of their residence at no cost.
Sources of evidence:
Orlando police department. Retrieved from http://www.cityoforlando.net/police/
Orlando police department neighborhood watch program. Retrieved from http://www.cityoforlando.net/police/citizen_info/neighborhood_watch.htm Orlando police department crime prevention program. Retrieved from http://www.cityoforlando.net/police/citizen_info/crime_prevention.htm D. Fire and Rescue
a. Fire department stations: The City of Orlando has a total of 17 fire departments comprised of 518 sworn firefighters serving a population of over 224,000 people within a 110 square mile area.
i. Station #1 located at 78 W Central Blvd ii. Station #2 located at 700 W Central Ave iii. Station #3 located at 2406 N Elizabeth Ave iv. Station #4 located at 900 N Ferncreek Ave
v. Station #5 located at 1818 S Orange Ave vi. Station #6 located at 3113 E Robinson St vii. Station #7 located at 601 Goldwyn Ave viii. Station #8 located at 6651 Shoalcreek Dr ix. Station #9 located at 3680 N Mercy Dr
x. Station #10 located at 5655 W Vineland Rd xi. Station #11 located at 4911 Curry Ford Rd xii. Station #12 located at 1588 Park Center Drive xiii. Station #13 located at 3464 5th Street xiv. Station #14 located at 5450 South Econlockhatche Trail xv. Station #15 located at 10199 Narcoosee Rd xvi. Station #16 located at 12375 Lake Nona Gateway Rd xvii. Station #17 located at 3691 Millenia Blvd
b. Equipment: 18 Engine trucks, 6 Tower trucks, 8 rescue trucks, 1 Heavy Rescue truck, 1 Hazmat truck, 1 Dive Rescue truck, 1 Air & Light truck and 1
Arson/Bomb(EOD) truck
c. Special Fire Forces:
i. Hazardous Material Team ii. Dive Rescue Team

COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT

22

iii. Confined Space Rescue Team iv. High/Angle Rescue Team
v. Florida Urban Search and Rescue- Task Force 4 (FL-TF4)
Sources of evidence:
Apparatus. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.cityoforlando.net/fire/Apparatus.htm
Firehouses. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.cityoforlando.net/fire/Firehouses.htm
Special operations. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.cityoforlando.net/fire/Special%20Operations%20Teams.htm E. Disaster Planning
a. Shelters: The city maintains a list of approved shelters in the event of a disaster and will notify people of their locations if people need to evacuate their homes.
Common shelter locations include
i. Schools ii. Recreational buildings
b. Evacuation Routes:
i. Evacuation route maps are provided by region, Orange county’s evacuation route can be accessed here: http://floridadisaster.org/publicmapping/Evac/EVAC_ORANGE.pdf c. The OCFL Alert:
i. An emergency notification and information app for Apple or Android users. It is first of its kind and provides residents with up-to-date information during a disaster.
Sources of evidence:
Florida Department of Emergency Management. (2012). Disaster preparedness maps. Retrieved from http://floridadisaster.org/publicmapping/index.htm
Orange County Government Florida . (2012). 2012 hurricane guide. Retrieved from http://www.orangecountyfl.net/EmergencySafety/HurricaneGuide2012.asp SECTION IV: Health Related Resources
A. Health Services (including public, acute, home care, community, long term, occupational)  There are approximately 60 Home Health Care Agencies within the city limits of Orlando. They provide many services ranging from nursing care, home

COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT









23

physical and occupational therapy, speech therapy and home medical equipment. The top three most well-known are:
1. Florida Hospital Home Health Care Services 407-691-8200
2. Gentiva Home Health Care 407-894-5703
3. Orlando Health Visiting Nurse Association 407-854-3100
There are approximately 160 long term care facilities in the city of Orlando, including the following:
1. Westminister Towers 407-841-1310
2. Adventist Care Centers 4047-975-3800
3. Metro-West Nursing and Rehab Center 407-294-4633
Orange County Health Department has multiple locations throughout Orange
County to service the public. These services range from medical health, dental health, and mental health. Their website at www.orchd.com offers a list of their services and contact numbers for each of their locations. Their website was updated in 2011.
There are two major hospitals in Orlando with several smaller locations to serve the Orlando area.
1. Florida Hospital 407-303-5600.
2. Orlando Regional Medical Center 321-841-5111
For Behavioral Health: Lakeside Behavioral Health 407-854-3700.

Sources of evidence:
HomeHealthCareAgencies.com updated 2013. Retrieved March 17, 2013.
Orlandoyellowpages.com.

Updated 2013. Retrieved March 17, 2013.

B. Social Services (elderly services, pregnant & parenting teams, family services, problem-focused services)
 For pregnant teens: Planned Parenthood of Greater Orlando 407-246-1788
 For seniors who need help, but want to stay in their own homes:
1. Home Instead Senior Care 407-445-8885
2. Granny Nannies 407-682-7758.
 For sexual assault help:
1. Victim Service Center 407-254-9415, hotline 407-497-6701
2. Women’s Residential and Counseling Center 407-425-1076
 For Domestic abuse:
1. Harbor House of Central Florida hotline: 407-886-2856/1-800500-1119 administrative 407-886-2244
2. Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence hotline: 1-800-5001119
 For homelessness in Orlando:
1. Coalition for the Homeless of Central Florida 407-426-1250.
Provides shelter, assistance getting on your feet, birthday parties

COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT

24 for homeless children. Provides shelter for an average of 750 people/families per night. Served more than 300,000 meals last year (2012). Run on volunteers and donations. Average age of the homeless child is 8.

Sources of evidence: www.centralflorida homless.org updated 2013. Retrieved March 17, 2013.

SECTION V: Government and Public Policies
A. Government Structure
 Seven elected members serve four year terms on the Board of County
Commissioners, including the mayor. The mayor and commissioners for districts 2, 4, 6 are elected during alternate years. Commissioners for districts
1, 3, 5 are elected in presidential years. They vote on many issues that affect the Orlando area. The Orange County Administration Center is located at 201
South Rosalind Avenue, Orlando, Florida 32801. The Council meetings are held in the council chambers of City Hall, 400 S. Orange Ave. You can watch meetings and votings on Orange TV, channel 199. Each of the commissioners has a webpage about them and their districts and the areas of concern for each of the districts. Their bios do not state their party affiliation.
It does also list their contact numbers, groups they belong to in the community and their recognitions. Their main website is located on the webpage www.cityoforlando.net and you can navigate through to the board of commissioners webpage.
 City of Orlando Mayor –Buddy Dyer


Commissioners:
District 1 – Jim Gray
District 2 – Tony Ortiz
District 3 - Robert F. Stuart
District 4 – Patty Sheehan
District 5 – Daisy W. Lynum
District 6 – Samuel B. Ings

Sources of evidence: www.cityoforlando.net updated 2013. Retrieved March 17, 2013.
C. Economics
 Metro Orlando serves as the headquarters for many companies such as Daren
Restaurants, Tupperware Corp, American Automobile Association, Ruth

COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT



25

Chris Steakhouse and many others. More than 150 international companies representing about 20 countries have operations in Metro Orlando. In the medical industry, Orlando is home to Lake Nona Medical City which is projected to create 30,000 jobs, and have a $7.6 billion dollar impact by year
10 of operation. Lake Nona will have many departments such as a children’s hospital, veteran affairs, and a cancer specialty center. Orlando is home to the
2nd largest university in the country – University of Central Florida which produces $122 million in annual research. Metro Orlando is home to the 7th largest research park in the country – Central Florida Research Park which is home to over 120 companies. Orlando International Airport is the 13th busiest in the country. Downtown Orlando is home to the Amway Center for the
Orlando Magic, Dr. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts, and the Citrus
Bowl. “Kiplinger has named Orlando as one of eight U.S. metropolitans to outpace the nation’s 7% job growth average between now and 2017 with a projected job growth of 15% over the next five years.” (Metro Orlando
Economic Development Commission 2012).
The City Of Orlando’s fiscal year runs from October 1 to September 30. The
2012/2013 Budget Book is available on the City of Orlando’s website. It is a
15 page budget book which is not feasible to produce in this report. It can be accessed at www.cityoforlando.net and going to the 2012/2013 budget book.

Sources of evidence: www.cityoforlando.net Metro Orlando Economic Development Commission updated 2012.
Retrieved March 17, 2013.

D. Public Issues in the Community
 The city of Orlando would like to be one of the most environmentally friendly communities in the nation. The city is developing projects to support and promote businesses to go “green”, encourage recycling on many levels, and projects to get the community involved to clean up waterways. Already in motion is weekly recycling pickup in the residential areas. Residential homes are provided with recycling bins and can get new ones by submitting an online form.  Another initiative going into play is “Best Foot Forward”. This initiative is designed to improve sidewalks and pedestrian signals at intersections to make it safer for those who walk.
 Another initiative is “Pathways for Parramore”. This is a program designed to improve the conditions of one of the city’s poorer neighborhoods. Some steps have been to provide scholarships to students to attend local college classes to help increase their education, reduce crime by keeping them off the streets, and help the youth get better jobs. Newer, safer homes were built in the area. Starting more neighborhood watch programs in the area has helped to reduce crime. There are plans to also increase business and retail shops in the area which will also help to provide much needed jobs.

COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT



These programs have been started by the mayor and the city of Orlando.

Sources of evidence: www.cityoforlando.net Office of the Mayor: Initiatives. Updated 2013. Retrieved March 17,
2013.

26…...

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