Free Essay

Marie Curie: a Martyr to Physics

In: Science

Submitted By parkerstewart
Words 1868
Pages 8
Marie Curie: A martyr to Physics

As a symbol of the human quest for knowledge and the ability to sacrifice oneself for a higher cause, Marie Curie helped shape the world as we know it with her discoveries and personal interest in the welfare of mankind. Born in 1867, of Polish parents, Marie garnered an early appreciation for education, with her father, a mathematics and physics professor, and mother, a pianist, stressing the importance of diligent study. At eleven, Marie was left with her father as her sole guardian after the tragic death of her mother to tuberculosis. As a result, Marie became increasingly interested in physics, graduating at the top of her high school class at a mere fifteen years of age. Post-graduation, Marie worked for eight years as a private tutor and governess to earn sufficient money to attend the Sorbonne University in Paris, having been denied admittance to the University of Warsaw on account of being a woman. In what little spare time she was left, Marie pursued a study of mathematics and physics, while attending what many dubbed “a poorly organized school” conducted by Polish professors in defiance of the Russian edict banning their organization, composed of “a group of men and women who tried to quench their thirst for knowledge in secret sessions” (Quinn 1). In1891, Marie finally realized the first of her goals, leaving for Paris to attend the Sorbonne. Despite poor living conditions, a distinct lack of food and sleep, which rendered her chronically-ill, Marie graduated first in her class in the spring of 1893. A year later, she received her master’s degree in mathematics, taking the first steps in practical experimentation which, years later, would be recalled as the initial chapter of what was to be her epic. Marie remained in Paris, in the employ of a French industrial organization, initially conducting experiments of a purely corporate nature. Finding the Sorbonne’s laboratories to be inadequate, however, Marie set out in search of new facilities with better equipment, meeting Pierre Curie in the process, a highly acclaimed professor at The School of Physics. Sharing many of the same academic interests Marie and Pierre’s mutual attraction culminated in their eventual marriage on the 26th of July, 1895. The years would see them draw even closer, for Marie found in Pierre more than a mere partner, but a collaborator, someone she could rely upon both physically and intellectually. Such was their report and abiding passion for academia that even the arrival of their beloved daughter in 1897, Irene, Scarcely affected their routine laboratory experiments. Marie later decided to pursue a doctorate in physics, focusing her thesis on the source of the rays emitted by uranium, whose theoretical existence had first been established by renowned scientist Antoine Henri Becquerel in 1896. Setting up her equipment in a small, glass-encased shed at The School of Physics, Marie performed tests on various minerals, namely pitchblende, which was discovered to contain high levels of radioactivity. Having begun work during the spring of 1898, by the summer Pierre had devoted his full time to aiding her continued studies which Marie had confined solely to pitchblende, given that it emitted the strongest rays. The curies developed a refining method that required them to process literal tons of minerals in order to obtain a minute sample of radioactive material:
We thus believe that the substance that we have extracted from pitchblende contains a metal never known before, akin to bismuth in its analytic properties. If the existence of this new metal in confirmed, we suggest that it should be called polonium after the name of the country of origin of one of us. (Froman 1) They also uncovered a second radioactive element that was much stronger, dubbing it Radium. Recognizing that the continued scientific exploration of their chosen field by both their contemporaries and future generations might well be thwarted by the suppression of their methodology, the Curies refrained from patenting their process. Later attempts to further isolate their initially discovered elements were stymied when the Curies discovered that the Uranium ore, Pitchblende, cost more than they could afford, while radium had escalated in price to the point where it was more highly-valued than gold. Marie circumvented the issue by finding a mine in Bohemia, where uranium was extracted from pitchblende, on which she made a moderate offer for bulk ore, which was accepted. Unaware of the damaging effects of the ionic-radiation Marie and Pierre took no safety precautions, the overexposure of which resulted in the skin of her hands peeling off. Marie’s recklessness extended to transporting test tubes of radioactive isotopes form work stations and labs by hand, even storing them in her desk drawers. Having announced their discovery on the 26th of December in 1898, it was not until March of 1902 that they were able to isolate sufficient radium to confirm its’ existence. From several tons of the original material, Marie isolated one decigram of almost pure radium chloride and had determined radium’s atomic weight as 225 (Froman 1). This, in turn, earned Marie her doctorate, the first awarded to a woman in Europe. Marie and Pierre also shared the Noble Prize in 1903 for Physics, the prize being divided with Becquerel, who had discovered X-rays. The citation read “in recognition of the extraordinary services they have rendered by their joint researches on the radiation phenomena discovered by Professor Henri Becquerel” (Froman 1). With the distinction of being the first woman to receive the Nobel Prize Marie attained international fame and resources sufficient to pay off some of her financial debts, accrued while researching Radium. The 25,000 francs she received were distributed between her family, friends, and invested into her work, with scarce a thought to her own personal comfort or luxuries. Following the birth of their second daughter, Eve Curie, In December of 1904, Marie returned to work in the laboratory with Pierre. Not long after Pierre passed way, having stepped into the path of a horse-drawn carriage on a Paris street. Pierre’s death left a vacancy in the physics department at the Sorbonne, one which Marie was uniquely situated and highly recommended to fill. Thus, in spite of her reluctance to occupy the position previously filled by her late-husband, Marie accepted, thus “the first time a woman had held this position” (The Nobel Foundation). When doubts arose concerning the credibility of her research and, more pointedly, the existence of Polonium and Radium, Marie strove tirelessly to isolate pure samples of each. “She alone was responsible for the large–scale chemical work required to separate Radium from radioactive residues in sufficient quantity to purify it and obtain its atomic weight” (Ruthford 674). Her research, which was phenomenally successful, led to the awarding of a second Nobel Prize in 1911 in the field of Chemistry, Making her the first person in history, and only woman, to ever receive the Nobel twice. After the First World War broke out, Marie proposed the use of mobile radiography units, later to be known as Little Curies, for the treatment of those wounded in battle. Intended to help locate bullets and facilitate surgery, the units were powered by radium gas, a colorless, radioactive emanation of the pure ore. Marie herself provided the tubes of Radium gas, which were purified in her laboratory, in addition to training over one-hundred and fifty women to operate the machines. The war effort would also lead to Marie sacrifice her Nobel Prize medals, cannibalizing their gold for use in the machines. In the words of Albert Einstein: “Marie Curie is, of all celebrated beings, the only one whom fame has not corrupted” (Quinn 1). Upon realizing that her status as a world-renowned celebrity lent her the ability to exert influence on those causes she deemed most worthy, Marie began speaking at meetings and conferences throughout the world, gradually becoming more comfortable in the spotlight. Recognizing common support for her work, Marie established a fundraiser for the Radium Institute, while lending her name to the cause for world peace by serving on the council of The League of Nations and its international committee on intellectual cooperation standards. As the 1920s drew to a close, Marie began to suffer almost constant fatigue, dizziness and a fleeting fever, in addition to a persistent humming in her ears and a gradual loss of eyesight that was only partially mitigated by a series of cataract operations. Though a number of her colleagues who had worked with Radium where displaying similar symptoms, and others had died at relatively young ages of cancer, Marie could not bring herself to admit that the element she and her husband had so laboriously dedicated themselves to the discovery of could possibly be at fault. As such, and in spite of the growing acknowledgement of Radium’s lethality, Marie continued to work with it, exercising her trademark lack of restraint. In the early 1930s, however, Marie’s health noticeably worsened, with doctors finally discovering the cause: pernicious anemia resulting from the cumulative effect of radiation exposure. The news was withheld from the public, as well as Marie herself, who on July 4th, 1934, perished amongst the mountains to which she had fled to recuperate. The modern day world, indebted to Marie Curie, was certainly changed as a result of her. To say the least, Marie’s scientific contributions played a monumental role in the development of modern science yet she is most notably known for her discoveries in regards to radiation. In as much as countless lives were spared as a result of her extensive research the repercussions thereof have been most beneficial in these latter days. Essentially, the use of modern medical technologies such as the X-Ray and cancer treatments have proven their usefulness. Furthermore, Marie provided the groundwork for many contemporary techniques to a degree that molecular biology, modern genetics, and the fount of nuclear energy leading to the atomic bomb came about. Marie was nothing less than a trail blazer for women into the world of science and education. As aforementioned she served as the first professor at one of the most prestigious Universities in Paris, the Sorbonne, and therefore can be viewed as an exemplar to the modern day woman. Thus it was not merely upon the scientific discipline that she left her mark, for she additionally unveiled woman’s place in the scientific community. It is not for breaking out of the traditional molds of her gender that she is remembered, but for her “contributions to knowledge, and, through her discoveries, to the welfare of mankind” (Ruthford 676). Her life yes, with all things, came to an end yet her legacy lives on.

Works Cited "Marie Curie - Biographical". Nobelprize.org. The Nobel Foundation 2013. Web. 14 Nov. 2013. http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/1903/marie-curie-bio.html
Froman, Nanny. “Marie and Pierre Curie and the Discovery of Radium and Polonium.”
Nobelprize.org. 1 December 1996. 14 Nov. 2013 Quinn, Susan. “Marie Curie” New York: Simon and Schuster, 1995. 13 Nov 2013 Ruthford. “Marie Curie.” The Slavonic and East European Review, Vol. 13, no. 39 (1935): 673-676. Web 13 Nov. 2013…...

Similar Documents

Free Essay

Physics

...Roger Truong Week 4 Physics Notes Experiment 1 * Rise and fall is pressure in the sound wave makes the flame move * The rise and fall in pressure makes the click sound * The rise and fall in the disturbance to what brings the sound to your ear * The square waves to what makes the flame move and bring the sound to your ear * The air molecules don’t move the disturbance does * For a 0.5 Hz your hear a click and the flame moves and resets * For 100 Hz the flame remains displaced and doesn’t recover * The transition from a click to a tone is between 20 and 50 Hz Reflection * Change in direction of a wave at an interference between two media wave returns into media from which it originated form. Wave Refraction * Change in direction of a wave when it passes from one medium to another caused by the different speeds of a wave * When water moves into different depths Wave Diffraction * Bending waves when they encounter an obstacle Absorption of waves * Reduction of energy in wave consumed by medium which it travels. * The main cause of absorption is Viscosity Interference * Two or more waves form coming together to make up a new wave Resonance * Tendency of a system to oscillate at a large amplitude at certain frequencies * Tendency to magnify a sound * The difference between an acoustic and electric guitar Wave Motion in Space and Time * Wave Motion in Space * Horizontal......

Words: 323 - Pages: 2

Free Essay

Physics

...TermPaperWarehouse.com - Free Term Papers, Essays and Research Documents The Research Paper Factory JoinSearchBrowseSaved Papers Home Page » Science Project 1 In: Science Project 1 Project 1 Write an essay of 1500 words, giving credible references on the use of physics in your daily activities. You need to mention 5 or more activities where physics is used. Remember to follow the APA style and give references. Physics is used in so many ways that most people do not even realize that they are using it. Even a stay at home mom uses physics more than one would think. Daily activities that many people do include physics without thinking about it, such as driving a car, using a headrest in a car, walking and running, flushing the toilet, and washing and drying clothes. Driving a car has many different aspects of physics involved, but today only acceleration, speed, and velocity will be discussed. People talk in terms of physics everyday without even knowing that is what they are discussing. For example, “speed” limit, how quickly a car can “accelerate,” and when they add a direction, they are actually talking about the velocity of a vehicle because velocity has a magnitude and direction, not just magnitude. According to Barry Parker in Issac Newton School of Driving, “you are accelerating and decelerating most of the time when you take a trip through the busy streets of a city, either by stepping on the gas, braking, or turning the steering wheel.”......

Words: 490 - Pages: 2

Free Essay

Physics

...Assignment in Physics... 1. Definition of Science, Major branches of science 2. Scientific Method 3. Definition of Physics and its major branches 4. Notable Physicist and their contribution 5. Importance of Physics in our everyday life and in our society. (Write the references) Short bond paper, written or computerized (font: Times New Roman/font size: 12) Reading assign. Measurement Diff. system of measurement fundamentals and derive quantities scientific notation rules in significant figures conversion of units http://www.hep.man.ac.uk/babarph/babarphysics/physicists.html ) I.1 Science The intellectual and practical activity encompassing the systematic study of the structure and behaviour of the physical and natural world through observation and experiment. I.2 The Branches of Science The Physical Sciences * Physics: The study of matter and energy and the interactions between them. Physicists study such subjects as gravity, light, and time. Albert Einstein, a famous physicist, developed the Theory of Relativity. * Chemistry: The science that deals with the composition, properties, reactions, and the structure of matter. The chemist Louis Pasteur, for example, discovered pasteurization, which is the process of heating liquids such as milk and orange juice to kill harmful germs. * Astronomy: The study of the universe beyond the Earth's atmosphere. The Earth Sciences * Geology: The science of the origin, history, and structure...

Words: 1431 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

Red the Martyr

...Red- The Martyr The mind is a wondrous and powerful tool that possesses the ability to control virtually all facets of one’s being. But, when not developed property, abused, and neglected the mind has the capacity to turn into an individual’s own worst enemy. This phenomenon is most commonly seen when observing criminals, and researching how their mind has been tainted or mistreated during the course of their lifetime. Society has the tendency to ignore various psychological deficiencies that people possess until it is too late, but are ironically quick to punish these individuals when they fall victim to their deficiency. There are thousands of real-life examples to choose from to analyze the psychological trait view theory of criminology, which aims to explain why individuals with psychological deficiencies commit crime, but the story of Red the Martyr illustrates it perfectly. The mind is truly a sensitive and fragile apparatus, but as one will see in the case Red, it has the potential to permanently and negatively alter one’s life. The psychological trait theory is a broad category of criminology that investigates how the functioning of the mind directly relates to commencement of committing crime (Siegel 2015:118). As Siegel documents, these associations of the mind include intelligence, personality, learning, and criminal behavior. A primary researcher in this area, Gabriel Tarde (1843-1904) gathered “people learn from one another through imitation” (Siegel......

Words: 1281 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

Physics

...A SIMULATION TO RIPPLE WHILE YOU WORK Objective: To examine reflection, interference, and diffraction in two dimensions and relate to the waves on a spring demo Everybody has at some time thrown a pebble into a puddle and observed the ripples spreading across the surface. Some of us don’t stop until the puddle has been completely filled with every loose piece of debris in the vicinity. Now let’s dive in a bit deeper into the physics. Select the Wave Interference simulation from the Sound and Waves folder 1) Before you change any settings a. What is the shape of the pulse? b. How can you explain this? Consider the wave velocity. REFLECTION: 2) Increase the amplitude to maximum. 3) Turn off the water and add a vertical wall (bottom right button) across the entire width of the tank. 4) Turn on the water for just a couple of drips. 5) Observe the wave reflection from the barrier a. What is the shape of the reflection? b. In what ways does it differ from the incident (incoming) wave? c. Compare this result to what you learned about reflected pulses from the wave on a spring demo? INTERFERENCE: 6) Allow the faucet to run. Feel free to adjust the frequency. a. Think back to the wave on a spring demo when multiple waves tried to occupy the spring at the same time (interference). What do you think the particularly bright and dark spots represent? 7) Show the graph and observe the last couple of waves in front of the wall. a. Once again, considering the......

Words: 665 - Pages: 3

Free Essay

Marie Curie

...Marie Curie Throughout the ages, there have been many notable scientists who have made lasting impressions on society. These scientists made countless discoveries and their contributions advanced scientific theories, concepts, and laws; be it Galileo’s theory of atoms or Newton’s laws of motion. One such scientist is Marie Curie. Known for her discovery of radium and polonium, Marie Curie is a strong representation of a woman who went against the odds and changed the study of physics in a mostly male dominated field. Curie encountered various challenges and hardships in her lifetime, but conquered them vigorously. Her hard work and dedication led to a lifetime of success and she left a lasting impact on society and other scientists around the world. Marie Curie was born in Warsaw, Poland on November 7, 1867. Her father was a mathematics and physics teacher and her mother was the head of a prestigious boarding school. Her parents valued academics and were scholarly, which, without a doubt, was a key factor in Curie’s fascination with academics. Her father often encouraged her studies but was unable to send her to a private school due to financial circumstances. He instead taught her how to read and secretly educated her on certain subjects that were forbidden by the Russians. However, since during this time period Poland was under the command of Russia, Curie’s father was faced with many difficulties. He ended up losing his teaching position because of his loyalty to......

Words: 1918 - Pages: 8

Premium Essay

Physics

...Professor PHYS 2010 October 21, 2014 Physics in Our Daily Activities Physics is a very important science that can almost be found anywhere in our lives. Many people find this statement hard to believe because they are not able to see the basic aspects of physics all around them. I personally think that unless the person is a physicist or at least someone who had some physics classes, chances are this person or someone is not going to understand how much physics affects our daily life. The significant effect of physics on us today can be easily seen when looking at our reliance on modern technology. Many of the technologies that are changing the world around us are based on physics principles. Physics is more than a subject we study in class, it is also a powerful tool that can help us to gain a better understanding of the everyday world. Physics can be seen in a lot of simple games that we play all the time. One of my favorite games that I almost play on a daily basis is pool. The physics associated with pool is mainly about the collisions between the pool balls. When two pool balls hit each other or collide the collision between them is known to be an elastic collision. According to Billiards in the Classroom, "elastic collisions are collisions in which both momentum and kinetic energy are conserved. The total system kinetic energy before the collision equals the total system kinetic energy after the collision." Therefore, we can assume that the collisions that......

Words: 1480 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

Physics

...NAME Cyber Intro to Conceptual Physics PHET Magnetism Lab Go to http://phet.colorado.edu Click Play with Sims and on electricity section Select the simulation “Magnets and Electromagnets.” Part I: Bar Magnet – Select the Bar Magnet Tab 1. Move the compass slowly along a semicircular path above the bar magnet until you’ve put it on the opposite side of the bar magnet. Describe what happens to the compass needle. 2. What do you suppose the compass needles drawn all over the screen tell you? 3. Move the compass along a semicircular path below the bar magnet until you’ve put it on the opposite side of the bar magnet. Describe what happens to the compass needle. 4. How many complete rotations does the compass needle make when the compass is moved once around the bar magnet? 5. Click on the “Show Field Meter” box to the right. What happens to the magnetic field reading as you move the meter closer to the bar magnet? 6. Click on the “Show planet Earth” box to the right. What type of magnetic pole (north or south) is at the geographical north pole of the Earth (Near Canada)? PART II: Electromagnet –Select the Electromagnet Tab: 7. Click on the electromagnet tab. Place the compass on the left side of the coil so that the compass center lies along the axis of the coil. (The y-component of the magnetic field is zero along the axis of the coil.) Move the compass along a semicircular path above the coil......

Words: 490 - Pages: 2

Free Essay

Marie Salomea Sklodowska-Curie

...Marie Salomea Sklodowska-Curie was born on November 7, 1867 in Warsaw, Poland. Of all the notable scientists in history, she is perhaps the strongest representation of a woman succeeding against all odds to change the field of physics and chemistry forever. Her discoveries led her from a childhood of obscurity to being one of the most well-known scientists of all time. Curie’s father taught Mathematics and Physics as a secondary teacher, and shared his passions and knowledge with his children. These were unusual subjects for girls to study at the time and Curie went on to achieve degrees in both because of her father's influence. Unfortunately, Curie’s family became lost everything when the principal of the school her father worked at, turned him in for being loyal to Poland, which was illegal under the Russian rule. Marie spent the rest of her youth struggling to fund her education. Marie Curie was an extremely intelligent woman who devoted her life to the pursuit of knowledge. She learned to read by the time she was four, “without even trying, it seemed” and soon she could read better than her older. At this young age she dreamed of becoming a scientist, even though such a dream would be difficult in her male dominated society. She received a general education in local schools and scientific training from her father. In 1891, Curie was finally able to continue her studies in the Sorbonne University, in Paris, where she studied and earned the equivalent of a master’s......

Words: 930 - Pages: 4

Free Essay

Physics

...Introductory Physics I Elementary Mechanics by Robert G. Brown Duke University Physics Department Durham, NC 27708-0305 rgb@phy.duke.edu Copyright Notice Copyright Robert G. Brown 1993, 2007, 2013 Notice This physics textbook is designed to support my personal teaching activities at Duke University, in particular teaching its Physics 141/142, 151/152, or 161/162 series (Introductory Physics for life science majors, engineers, or potential physics majors, respectively). It is freely available in its entirety in a downloadable PDF form or to be read online at: http://www.phy.duke.edu/∼rgb/Class/intro physics 1.php It is also available in an inexpensive (really!) print version via Lulu press here: http://www.lulu.com/shop/product-21186588.html where readers/users can voluntarily help support or reward the author by purchasing either this paper copy or one of the even more inexpensive electronic copies. By making the book available in these various media at a cost ranging from free to cheap, I enable the text can be used by students all over the world where each student can pay (or not) according to their means. Nevertheless, I am hoping that students who truly find this work useful will purchase a copy through Lulu or a bookseller (when the latter option becomes available), if only to help subsidize me while I continue to write inexpensive textbooks in physics or other subjects. This textbook is organized for ease of presentation and ease of learning. In particular, they......

Words: 224073 - Pages: 897

Premium Essay

Physics

...Introduction In this project questions relating to Thermal Physics and Kinetic theory will be discussed and also diagrams to further explain them will be attached. Section B of the Physics syllabus will be completed by the end of this project. Bibliography http://www.google.com/search?q=Laboratory+thermometer&rlz=1C1CHWA_enLC632LC632&oq=Laboratory+thermometer&aqs=chrome..69i57j69i59j69i60&sourceid=chrome&es_sm=93&ie=UTF-8#q=explain+the+design+of+a+laboratory+thermometer http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silicate_glass#Silicate_glass http://www.livescience.com/39994-kelvin.html 1. Thermal energy transfer by: * Conduction is the flow of heat energy through materials and substances in direct contact with each other. A conductor is a material that permits heat energy to flow freely within it. The better the conductor the more rapidly heat will be transferred. Conduction takes place when heat is supplied to a substance, the particles in that substance gain more energy and vibrate more. These particles then bump into neighboring particles and some of their energy is transferred to them. This process continues and energy is eventually transferred from the hotter end to the colder end of the object. * Thermal convection is transferred from hot places to cold places by convection. Convection occurs when warmer areas of gas or liquid rises to cooler areas of that gas or liquid. The cooler gas or liquid replaces the warmer areas......

Words: 1957 - Pages: 8

Premium Essay

Physics

...No. Information on Every Subject 1. Unit Name: Physics I 2. Code: FHSP1014 3. Classification: Major 4. Credit Value: 4 5. Trimester/Year Offered: 1/1 6. Pre-requisite (if any): No 7. Mode of Delivery: Lecture, Tutorial, Practical 8. Assessment System and Breakdown of Marks: Continuous assessment: 50% - Theoretical Assessment (Tests/Quizzes/Case Studies) (30%) - Practical Assessment (Lab reports/Lab tests) (20%) Final Examination 9. 10. 50% Academic Staff Teaching Unit: Objective of Unit: The aims of this course are to enable students to: • appreciate the important role of physics in biology. • elucidate the basic principles in introductory physics enveloping mechanics, motion, properties of matter and heat. • resolve and interpret quantitative and qualitative problems in an analytical manner. • acquire an overall perspective of the inter-relationship between the various topics covered and their applications to the real world. • acquire laboratory skills including the proper handling and use of laboratory apparatus and materials. 11. Learning Outcome of Unit: At the end of the course, students will be able to: 1. Identify and practice the use of units and dimensional analysis, uncertainty significant figures and vectors analysis. 2. Apply and solve problems related to translational and rotational kinematics and dynamics in one and two dimensions. 3. Apply and solve problems related to......

Words: 765 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Physics

...Physics Lab 4 Part 1: Friction Parabola Track 3a. Kinetic energy is the highest when the skate board has reached its lowest point. 3b. Kinetic energy is the lowest when in the middle of the drop. 4a. Potential energy is the highest when the skate board has reached the highest point. 4b. Potential energy is lowest when in the middle of the drop. 5a. Total energy is the highest when potential energy is at its highest point. 6. The value of thermal energy is 0 only when potential energy is highest. David Del Rio Physics PH 2530 Lab 4 Energy 04/06/2015 Part 1: Loop Track 8. When a skateboarder moves, what happens to the kinetic and potential energy? Conservative (closed) or non-conservative (open) system? - Kinetic energy rises as the skateboarder moves downward. -potential energy rises as the skateboarder moves up. - Non-Conservative 9. Where is the skateboarder at on the ramp when he reaches the maximum point of potential energy? 4546.93 11. m = 76./kg The skateboarders mass = 76 kg 12a. calculated mass = 76 kg 12b. Actual mass 75 kg 12c. Comparison = .98% 13. When the coefficient is adjusted half way the kinetic energy decreases to 0 as to the potential energy decreases and finally stabilizes. - This is a closed system. Part 2: Friction Parabola Track 2a. kinetic energy is highest when the skaters’ board is at the lowest point 2b. in the middle of the drop the kinetic energy is highest. 3a. potential energy is the highest when the......

Words: 457 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Physics

...the gravitational force on it is nearly constant. As a result, an object in free fall accelerates downward at a constant rate. This acceleration is usually represented with the symbol g. Physics students measure the acceleration due to gravity using a wide variety of timing methods. In this experiment, you will have the advantage of using a very precise timer connected to the calculator and a Photogate. The Photogate has a beam of infrared light that travels from one side to the other. It can detect whenever this beam is blocked. You will drop a piece of clear plastic with evenly spaced black bars on it, called a Picket Fence. As the Picket Fence passes through the Photogate, the LabPro or CBL 2 interface will measure the time from the leading edge of one bar blocking the beam until the leading edge of the next bar blocks the beam. This timing continues as all eight bars pass through the Photogate. From these measured times, the program will calculate the velocities and accelerations for this motion and graphs will be plotted. Picket fen ce Figure 1 OBJECTIVE • Measure the acceleration of a freely falling body (g) to better than 0.5% precision using a Picket Fence and a Photogate. MATERIALS LabPro or CBL 2 interface TI Graphing Calculator DataGate program Physics with Calculators Vernier Photogate Picket Fence clamp or ring stand to secure Photogate Modified from and reported with permission of the publisher Copyright (2000), Vernier......

Words: 2335 - Pages: 10

Free Essay

Marie Curie

...Marie Curie I think I am lucky to learn at a school named for famous female scientist of the world. Her name is Marie Sklodowska Curie. She was a physicist, chemist French-Polish, famous worldwide for the study of radioactivity. Marie Curie is the first woman and also the world's only twice been awarded the Nobel Prize in two different fields, is enshrined as the most outstanding female scholars worldwide. Marie Curie's life is a miraculous story, with lots of great achievements. Marie Curie was born on November 17, 1867 in small town near the capital of Poland. When she was a child, she revealed more intelligent than people and not deterred by any difficulty and challenge to the scientific world to the vast, mysterious and exciting. After many years of research, she got many achievements by herself. In 1902, Marie Curie and her husband is Pierre Curie discovered the mysterious element radium. It opened the door to strong changes in the way scientists think about matter and energy. She also led the way to a new era for medical knowledge and the treatment of diseases. Many scientists on the world were very interested in this discovery because her research into a scientific discovery is very great, affecting the future of nuclear physics. Marie Curie has found the application of radioactive material in the chemical industry, in treatment and especially in biology, anatomy and X-ray industry to fight cancer. Nowadays, the radioactive substances and X-rays are used in......

Words: 336 - Pages: 2