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Kelvin

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Submitted By koku
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Produced by the General Conference Youth Ministries Department 2011
This material is protected by copyright
All rights reserved
This material may not be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopy, recording, scanning, or other) without the prior permission of the publisher

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Contents
Arts & Crafts

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Household Arts

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Nature

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Recreation

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Spiritual

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Introduction
It has been more than twenty years since the first edition of the
Adventurer Awards Manual was produced at the General Conference for the World Adventurer Ministry. There have been many changes, additions, and improvements during this time. Adventurer Ministry has shown huge growth as well. Youngsters in this age group are full of energy and get excited about being a part of an organization that is designed to expand their view of their world and strengthen their relationship with God, Mom, and Dad through ways that are so much fun.
The roof over Adventurer Ministry is supported by several strong pillars.
You hold in your hands one of them: the latest updated manual covering all 83 currently accepted Awards for use around the world. There is of course, one small problem: This area of Adventurer fun is not a static field of possibilities, it is a constantly growing—maybe almost exploding—source of activity. Therefore even at the time of this edition’s printing, there are already more Awards being created, piloted, and introduced. You will want to check out the General Conference Youth Ministry website periodically to see what new fun, eye opening, mind expanding, energizing Awards are coming out next.
We recommend that you carefully review all of the Awards herein published and select for your program a variety that will provide each of your Adventurers with a well-rounded program to whet their interest and excitement. Look for ways to make each Award meaningful and interesting.
Requirements are minimums, not maximums; the objective should NEVER be to just add another patch to a child’s sash at whatever minimum effort! The objective is to awaken in the child an interest in developing a passion or to stir up a latent, previously hidden talent. The more we challenge each child to do their best, the more each one will grow “in wisdom and stature and in favor with God and man.”
Lest we forget that ours is a MINISTRY and not just another club, we are to constantly remember that a key component of every Award is the spiritual component—while each Award is to awaken an interest in the chosen subject, it should also show the Adventurer another facet of God’s interest in and care for each child. While perfection is not the requirement in every Award, we should constantly seek to encourage each one to do their absolute best at whatever level they find themselves in recognizing that God is not finished with them yet—nor with us as leaders either!
--Bob Holbrook, Retired World Adventurer Director.

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Philosophy and Objectives of the Adventurer Awards
Each award is designed to be a course of study that introduces a subject.
This subject should have practical value and should enhance the lifestyle of the person pursuing the award. Award study should assist the person in his/her development as a well-rounded Christian by directly affecting the social, emotional, physical, and spiritual aspects of life. The study of an award should direct the child to a deeper love of the Creator and should increase one’s interest in committing their life in service to God and to the community. Award study is intended to help the child’s spiritual character development. Therefore, every award should be designed to require high standards of excellence by clearly stating in all requirements what tasks are to be accomplished. Fulfilling the requirements should be interesting and fun, while at the same time providing the child with a sense of achievement.
Because Adventurer awards are a part of a church-sponsored program, all facets of course study should be in harmony with basic church standards.
For this reason award study would normally avoid topics with requirements calling for destruction of plant or animal life as well as types of armed of unarmed defense. Also, subjects should be avoided that could only be studied by a small group of people in a single local area.
It is the purpose of all awards to help the child to “increase in wisdom and stature and in favor with God and man.”
The Adventurer Club provides fun and creative ways for children. . .
1. to develop a Christ-like character;
2. to experience the joy and satisfaction of doing things well;
3. to express their love for Jesus in a natural way;
4. to learn good sportsmanship and strengthen their ability to get along with others;
5. to discover their God-given abilities and to learn how to use them to benefit self and serve others;
6. to discover God’s world;
7. to improve their understanding of what makes families strong;
8. to develop parental support for the training of children.

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Guidelines for Participating in the Adventurer Award Program
1. Children age 6 - 9 (or in grades 1 to 4) are eligible for Adventurer membership. 2. Club activities include Adventurer Awards, field trips, and regular club meetings. Before joining the club, the Adventurer must agree to participate and cooperate in these activities.
3. Members must be faithful in attendance. Many clubs establish limits on absences and tardinesses, and Adventurers who do not comply with these regulations are asked to withdraw from the club.
4. The parents of the Adventurers must be willing to agree to and cooperate with the regulations and activities of the club, as agreed on the Adventurer Application Blank. At times they may be asked to supply money and time to support their child’s membership.
5. Adventurers should own and regularly wear a complete Adventurer uniform. They must come to meetings and club-sponsored events in full uniform, as advised by the club director.
6. Adventurers are expected to obey all regulations and instructions of the
Adventurer staff.
7. Club members must be willing to participate in community service projects and Share Your Faith and Outreach programs.
8. Adventurers must learn and live by the principles of the Adventurer
Pledge and Law.

Difference Between Pathfinders and Adventurers
The Adventurer Club has been created so younger children may have a club of their own. The programming and planning for the Adventurer Club should be simple and short, but creative. In some ways the Pathfinder and Adventurer
Clubs are similar, but the Adventurer program is to be unique in its own way and should be kept separate. One of the Adventurer Club objectives is to provide a meaningful and exciting experience as the children look forward with anticipation to being a Pathfinder in the future. The Pathfinder Club is designed to meet the growing needs of children ages 10-15 by strengthening healthy peer relationships. Adventurers is designed to meet the needs of 6-9 year olds by strengthening their family relationships.
It is not intended that we duplicate all the experiences of Pathfindering, but rather that by providing a separate Adventurer Club many needs of the youth aged 6-9 will be met in an exciting and enjoyable way and thus they will be ready to fully enjoy the Pathfinder experience when that time arrives.
In many instances parents have children in both clubs and may be involved themselves. Therefore, it may be necessary to operate the Adventurer and
Pathfinder club meetings at the same hour and day, but this does not mean that the clubs should be combined.
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Check List for Evaluating New Adventurer Awards
Check to see if the award (or a similar one) already exists: http://gcyouthministries.org/Ministries/Adventurers/Awards/ tabid/83/Default.aspx
If no existing award is found, please complete the following requirements: __________

1. The award requirements must uphold the standards and philosophy of the Seventh-day Adventist church.

__________

2. The award requirements must include a balance of theory and “hands on” activities.

__________

3. Requirements should be usable in a group setting or by a single individual. __________

4. Requirements should be able to be completed in less than three months.

__________

5. Requirements should clearly state in simple terminology exactly what is to be accomplished. (Avoid ambiguous words or phrases such as
“explain briefly,” or “demonstrate ability.”)

__________

6. Requirements must consider care of our natural environment. For example, to avoid destruction of animal or plant life, ask for photos or drawings rather than collections.

__________

7. Activity requirements of extended time are worded so as to avoid conflicts with school or work schedules.

__________

8. All requirements are to be accomplished in a safe and supervised environment. They must comply with legal requirements and will avoid involvement in armed or unarmed defenses.

__________

9. Requirements should be able to be accomplished without unduly affecting the safety of its participants.

__________

10. The requirements should reflect current practice and language.

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Approval Procedure for a New Adventurer Award
1. All new award requests should be submitted to the local conference
Adventurer director for verification that the award has met criteria as stated on the worksheet for developing new awards.
2. The local conference Adventurer director then submits the new award to the Division Adventurer Specialty Committee chairman.
3. The new award request is then submitted to the Adventurer Award
Study Committee for approval. Awards which are not approved are then returned to their author with written explanation for reasons of rejection or need for revision. A copy of the letter should also be sent to the local conference Adventurer director.
4. Approved awards are submitted to the General Conference Award
Committee for final approval and processing of the award. A letter of recognition and thanks would be sent to the author by the Award
Committee chairman.

Instructions for Completing New Award Worksheet
1.
2.
3.
4.

Supply all biographical data as requested.
Indicate proposed title and topical category for new award.
Briefly state the purpose for the proposed award.
Submit a suggested sketch for the award. Indicate design colors.
(Note: patch designs should include no more than three colors plus the background color.)
5. Indicate the appropriate difficulty level(s) for the award. Difficulty levels are 1-4.
6. List specific sources needed for completing award requirements.
For each source be sure to list title, author, publisher, and copyright date. 7. List materials needed to complete award and an estimate of their cost per person. Also estimate the time needed to complete the award. - 12 -

WORKSHEET FOR DEVELOPING NEW ADVENTURER AWARDS
NAME _______________________________________________________

ADDRESS ___________________________________________
CITY _____________________ STATE ______

ZIP ________

DATE OF SUBMISSION _________________________________
TITLE ______________________________________________
CATEGORY __________________________________________
PURPOSE OF ________________________________________
Level(s) of difficulty:

___________

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References (Include author, title, publisher, date published): ___
___________________________________________________
___________________________________________________
Materials needed and estimated cost:
___________________________________________________
___________________________________________________
Estimated time needed to complete Award:
______________ Hours
(FOR OFFICE USE ONLY)
DATE RECEIVED _______________________________________
DATE ACTED ON ______________________________________
CONFERENCE ________________________________________
SIGNATURE __________________________________________
(Conference Youth Director)
_________ Accepted. Send on to Division Committee.
_________

Rejected. Send back to author with letter of explanation. - 13 -

AWARD REQUIREMENTS
(List)

___________________________________________________
___________________________________________________
___________________________________________________
AWARD ANSWER SHEET
Briefly suggest what should be required for testing an individual or how to determine if the Award has been completed.
___________________________________________________
___________________________________________________
___________________________________________________
___________________________________________________

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Title

Year

Creator

Page

Artist

1996

GC

19

Basket Maker

1996

GC

21

Bead Craft

unknown

GC

23

Build & Fly

unknown

GC

25

Building Blocks

2004

NAD

27

Buttons

2006

NAD

29

Carpenter

unknown

GC

31

Glue Right

2004

NAD

33

Hand Shadows

2004

NAD

35

Handicraft

1996

GC

37

Magnet Fun I

2006

NAD

39

Magnet Fun II

2007

NAD

41

Media Critic

1996

GC

43

Music Maker

unknown

GC

45

My Picture Book

2005

NAD

47

Postcards

2007

NAD

49

Reporter

1996

GC

51

Sign Language

1996

NAD

53

Stamping Fun Art

2008

NAD

55

Tin Can Fun

2003

NAD

57

Troubadour

1996

GC

59

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Artist
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements

1. Describe what an artist does.
2. Name the primary colors.
a. Mix these colors to make three new colors.
b. Use these six colors to make a picture.
3. Demonstrate how to sharpen pencils and clean brushes.
a. Sharpen two pencils.
b. Using water, clean your brush.
4. Make separate designs using at least two of the following:
a. Finger paints
b. Colored pencils, crayons, or chalk
c. Felt markers
d. Pen, pencil, or charcoal
5. Learn an art technique and demonstrate two of the following:
a. Potato prints on batik
b. Stencil
c. Paper-Mache
d. Bread dough art or clay model
e. Relief map or scale model
6. Make two of the following:
a. An invitation
b. A bookmark
c. A greeting card
d. A poster

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Supporting Answers

1. An artist is one who professes and practices a creative art. Discuss with the children what type of artist they are. Do they sing, play an instrument, draw, play act, do crafts well, etc.? In different ways, we are all artists.
2. Red, yellow, and blue are the primary colors. Mix red and yellow to make orange; mix yellow and blue to make green; mix blue and red to obtain violet.
3. Teach how to sharpen pencils. Stress cleaning brushes thoroughly.
Stress safety in handling pencils and brushes.
4. Wear protective covering or old clothes when working with finger paints or felt markers. Encourage creativity.
5. Encourage creative designs. Teach children to clean up after their project is completed. Craft books or your local library will have helpful resources. 6. The invitation or poster may be introduced at an Adventurer meeting or church program, etc. Make a card, bookmark, or other item that may be given as a gift to an older person or shut-in (one who is confined to home). Updated in: 1996

Grade
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1

Basket Maker
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements

1. Explain what a basket is.
2. Describe several baskets found in your home and tell how they are used. 3. Name and describe the tools of a basket maker.
4. Tell how materials are prepared for basket weaving.
5. Make a simple basket of natural grasses, reeds, or other local material,
OR decorate a basket to be used in a practical way in your home, such as those used for sewing, trash, berries, or flowers.
6. Decorate a basket to be given as a gift.
7. Make a basket with a handle.

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Supporting Answers

1. A basket is a receptacle (container) made from interwoven material.
2. Baskets may be used for laundry, shopping, fruit, berries, sewing, collecting waste paper, etc.
3. Some essential tools are: sharp pair of scissors, sharp knife, round and flat nose pliers to bend spokes, an awl or knitting needle to make spaces in the weaving, water pail and waterproof cover for area where you are working. You may wish to invite an experienced basket maker to come and demonstrate.
4. The natural materials are soaked in water until they are flexible.
5. Instructors are encouraged to choose a simple design so that the
Adventurer(s) will not become discouraged. Work with each child as necessary so all may complete this project. Use local materials such as grapevine, reeds, grasses, etc.
6. Decorate a basket such as a sewing basket, fruit basket, flower basket, or shopping basket to be given as a gift. If you have already decorated a basket to fulfill requirement five, keep in mind that this is to be an additional basket.

Updated in: 1996

Grade 4
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Bead Craft
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

What is a bead?
Where did the word “bead” come from?
Name some of the materials that are used to make beads.
Tell at least two interesting facts about the history of beads.
Name at least three things you can do with beads.
Make four or more different objects with beads.
Give one of your bead projects to someone, such as an elderly person.
Tell them what you’ve learned about beads, and explain what’s special about the gift you have made for them.

Supporting Answers

1. A bead is a small object with a hole in it so that it can be fastened with thread or string. (Most beads are round.)
2. The word “bead” comes from an Old English word—”gebed” or
“bede”—which means “prayer.”
3. Beads can be made out of things like seeds, wood, stone, plastic, glass, metal, ceramic, pearls, shells, berries, beans, ivory, coral, amber, or precious stones.
4. Historical facts about beads include:
a. People made things out of beads in Egypt in Bible times.
b. The world’s first calculator was an abacus, which is made out of beads. It is still used in many countries.
c. Beads were used as money by American Indians and other native peoples. “Wampum,” or Indian money beads, were often made out of shells. Indians used beads to trade with the Pilgrims.
d. Some Indians used porcupine quills or pieces of bone for needles to string beads on thread made out of horse hair or cotton.
e. People who are Catholic or Buddhist often use beads to help them remember and count their prayers.
f. Beads have been used to decorate clothes for more than 400 years.
5. Some things that you can do with beads are:
a. Glue them onto something for decoration
b. Perl (melt beads)
c. String them together
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d. Use them to trade, or for play money
e. Decorate clothes
f. Make pot holders or other things to decorate your home
g. Count things
6. Suggested bead projects:
a. String beads onto a pipe cleaner and shape it into a heart, cross, or shepherd’s rod.
b. Sew beads onto a piece of cloth in the shape of your name (or initials). c. Trace a picture or design onto heavy paper or cloth. Glue or sew beads onto it.
d. Make a refrigerator magnet using beads. (Glue them onto a clothespin or piece of felt, or string them on thread or wire.)
e. Decorate a bean bag with beads.
f. Sew beads on shoes or moccasins.
g. String beads onto thread or ribbon and wrap them around the outside of a picture frame.
h. Make a sculpture by stringing beads onto copper wire.

Updated in:

Grade 3
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Build and Fly
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

Make a paper airplane and fly it.
Make a simple glider and fly it.
Make a simple kit, fly it, and explain the safety rules.
Observe four different animals that fly and tell how they fly.
Draw a picture of your favorite flying animal.
Know where the Bible speaks of an angel flying.
Know who the first successful motorized airplane pilots were.
Work a crossword puzzle about types of flying.

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Supporting Answers

1. Teach the children to make their own paper airplanes. Color or decorate them and have fun flying them. Have contests where you see which one flies the farthest, longest, etc.
2. You may wish to use a simple balsa wood kit or make your own from scratch. Have each child put his/her name or initials on his/her glider.
Fly the gliders and record the longest flight.
3. Make a simple, standard kite. Include family help when making and flying the kites. Never fly kites near electric power lines, buildings, trees, or around a crowd of people. Use strong string and read the instructions on a purchased kite.
4. Visit the zoo or see a video about birds, insects, bats, squirrels, fish, etc.
5. Discuss each picture and let the child tell why he/she likes the particular creature he/she drew.
6. Revelation 14:6. We do not know exactly how the angels fly, but we are told that the children will fly from place to place with the angels. What a wonderful promise!
7. Tell or read an age appropriate story of the Wright brothers. Explain how they didn’t give up but kept trying until they could actually fly a plane. Persistence paid off!
8. Give the children a crossword puzzle or similar game illustrating types of flight.

Updated in:

Grade 3
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Building Blocks
Originated in: North American Division

Requirements

1. Read and review three or more of the Bible stories listed below:
a. Noah (Gen 6-7)
b. Tower of Babel (Gen 11:1-9)
c. Abram’s tent (Gen12:1-8)
d. Wilderness tabernacle (Ex 25-27)
e. Solomon’s temple (1 Chronicles 28:1-10, 2 Chronicles 3-5)
f. Manger (Luke 2:1-20)
g. Wise man and foolish man (Luke 6:47-49)
h. New Jerusalem (Rev.21-22)
2. Invite a builder or carpenter to talk about the:
a. Tools he/she uses (display and demonstrate)
b. Kinds of things he/she builds
c. Safety rules he/she follows
d. Values like being honest, measuring carefully, following instructions/plans, setting a strong foundation
3. Share two choices that you can make this week that will build up and not break down your character. A building’s foundation is the most important part of the building. Our foundation is our character. Jesus, the master builder, will help us make good choices that will build a strong character.
4. Read Revelation 21-22 and learn about the heavenly home that God is making for all who choose His gift of eternal life. What building materials is He using?
5. Construct one or more buildings of any size or type. You may work individually or in teams.

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Supporting Answers

1. As you review the stories, emphasize the items built and encourage the children to discuss the choices the Bible characters made.
a. God asked Noah to build an ark. It took Noah 120 years to build the ark and he lived on it for more than one year. Extra: How big was the ark? Use a long measuring tape to find out.
b. Babel—God knew the best thing for the people at that time was to live in tents so they could spread across the earth—not to build the tower of Babel.
c. Abram’s home was a tent. Extra: Make Abram’s tent out of sheets and chairs.
d. God asked Moses to build a portable tabernacle.
e. God asked Solomon to build a tabernacle in Jerusalem.
f. God sent Joseph and Mary to a stable.
g. At the end of the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus refers to a man who built a house by first laying a strong foundation on a rock.
h. God wants you to live in the house He is building for you in heaven.
2. Questions you might ask: What materials do you build with? How do you know where to build? What is this tool used for? What do you need to learn to be a good builder? Alternatives: take a trip to a construction site, interview a workman and ask questions about the building.
3. Ways to share choices (you may work in teams):
a. Draw a brick wall on a poster and write one choice or characteristic on each brick.
b. Mime or act out a choice.
c. Illustrate a choice in a painting, drawing, sculpture, or on a computer, video or camera.
d. Sing a song describing good character-building choices.
e. Privately, write a poem or journal, reflecting on your choice.
4. Bring gemstones to touch and see or show pictures of the New
Jerusalem.
5. Any type of building materials may be used, such as toys like Lego,
Lincoln Logs, or Tinker Toys, or craft sticks, play dough, foam board, or construction paper. Real building materials such as sticks, straw, mud, or bricks may also be used.
Suggestions for types of buildings: Bible buildings, your home, school, favorite shop, church, imagined heavenly home.

Updated in: 2004

Grade 3
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Buttons
Originated in: North American Division

Requirements

1. Create and decorate a clothing button container.
2. Start a collection of clothing buttons. Variety is more important than quantity, though each child should have approximately fifty buttons.
3. Decorate with buttons and/or complete a button craft.
4. Play the “Button, button, who has the button?” game.
5. Have a “Button Trade Night.”
6. Read and discuss Hebrews 13:16.

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Supporting Answers

1. Use a container of our choice, such as an oatmeal box, tin, shoe box, or cloth bag. Decorate with buttons, paint, paper, etc.
2. Ask family, friends, and church members for buttons.
3. Some suggestions are: Sew buttons on clothing, glue buttons on to a frame, punch holes in heavy card stock and secure a button on back to create a card to send someone or to display buttons. Sew on small buttons to decorate napkins, place mats, or napkin rings. Stamp a design on cloth and add buttons. See “resources” for more button crafts.
4. The children all stand (or sit) in a circle with their hands out, palms together. One child, takes a button and goes around the circle, putting their hands in everybody else’s hands one by one. In one person’s hands, they drop the button, though they continue to put their hands in the others’ so that no one knows where the button is except for the giver and receiver. The leader starts the other children guessing by saying, “Button, button, who’s got the button?” before each child’s guess.
The child guessing replies with their choice, e.g. “Billy has the button!”
If you have the button, you choose someone else so that no one knows it’s you. Once the child with the button is finally guessed, that child is the one to distribute the button and start a new round.
5. It is important to make this a sharing event and avoid competition.
Suggestion: Make teams, giving each team a specific amount of buttons and specific designs to make, but they have the option of trading buttons with other teams to complete their projects, which gives them a sense of sharing with others.
6. Talk about how the children can be like Jesus by sharing with others.

Updated in: 2006

Grade
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1

Carpenter
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements

1. Explain the work of a carpenter.
2. Name three things that a carpenter builds.
3. Read the following texts and tell what each carpenter built:
a. Genesis 6:14-16
b. Exodus 30:1-3
c. 2 Samuel 5:11
4. Identify the basic tools required for simple woodworking and explain how to take care of them.
5. Visit one of the places listed below:
a. Lumber yard
b. Hardware store
c. Woodworking shop
d. Sawmill
6. Use carpenter tools to make one of the following:
a. Birdhouse or feeder
b. Key holder
c. Napkin holder
d. Other useful wooden object
7. Discuss Jesus the Carpenter and things He may have made.

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Supporting Answers

1. A carpenter is a person who builds or repairs wooden structures and makes other articles of wood.
2. Some things that carpenters make are buildings, furniture, toys, etc.
3. Genesis 6:14-16, the Ark; Exodus 30:1-3, an Altar; 2 Samuel 5:11, the
Temple.
4. Basic tools include a hammer, hand saw, measuring tape, screw driver, chisel, boring tools, and planes. Clean and put away after each use. You may wish to have a carpenter come to demonstrate the use and care of these tools.
5. This may be done as a group, with parents, or you may have a carpenter visit your group and show types of wood, etc.
6. Use simple designs for the project you choose. For safety use, use only hand tools. This project must be closely supervised by an adult who can demonstrate how to use the tools properly.
7. Matthew 13:55 speaks of Christ as a carpenter. Discuss how He may have helped His earthly father make such things as tables, benches, cabinets, stairs, doors, window frames, etc.

Updated in:

Grade 4
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Glu e Right
Originated in: North American Division

Requirements

1. Practice controlling the glue on scratch paper.
2. Learn how to control the glue by practicing different methods of applying glue.
3. Child may glue a star, sequin, or other items on the line they think they learned the most about controlling glue and tell why.
4. Read and discuss Proverbs 18:24.
5. Make a craft or picture using glue the right way.
6. Put glue evenly in a small circle on the back of your hand. Wait for it to dry. Can you pull the glue off your hand in one piece?
7. When you are finished with the glue, always clean the top of the glue container and replace the cap.

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Supporting Answers

1. Providing glue containers with undamaged tips is important for the success of this award. Instruct children to practice squeezing the glue bottle lightly to make a thin line and then squeeze a little more to make a thick line. When they feel they have control of the glue, they are ready to practice on the form.
2. Create a glue right form or find a sample form on the NAD Adventurer website under “awards.”
a. Lines 1 & 2: Make the glue flow in a thick line to fill the space without going past the end of the lines.
b. Lines 3 & 4: Squeeze the glue very lightly and hold the tip of the container above the paper. Make the glue flow only on top of the thin lines without going past the end of the lines.
c. Lines 5 & 6: Cover each dash without going past the end of the dash by squeezing and raising the container up when the first dash ends and putting it down, squeezing again to make the next dash.
d. Circles: Put the glue in the middle of the circle and squeeze the container lightly and let the glue spread out to the edges. Fill in each circle without going past the lines.
e. Magazine pictures: Thin paper takes very little glue. Put just a small touch of glue on your finger and lightly touch the corners of the picture so the glue will not show through to the front side.
f. Design: Use any type of sequins, gems, or small trinkets. Squeeze a small amount of glue on scratch paper. Use a toothpick to put glue on the items like sequins. Larger, heavier items will take more glue.
g. Outline the star in glue and cover with glitter. For best results, do one angle at a time or use a toothpick. Recommend staff set up one location where glitter is applied.
3. Never judge the success of this award by how neatly they completed the Glue Right form. The award is a success if they understand the techniques and know it is their job to learn ways to control glue.
4. The friend who stays faithful, even when all others turn away, reflects
Jesus. He is the true and faithful Friend, the One who never fails.
5. Any craft that requires glue is appropriate.
6. No purpose—just fun.

Updated in: 2004

Grade 2
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Hand Shadows
Originated in: North American Division

Requirements

1. Teach each child how to make several hand shadow pictures.
2. Once they have learned to make the hand shadows, ask the following questions: a. Which hand shadow do you most enjoy?
b. Which was the hardest to learn?
c. Why was it more difficult?
d. Were there some shadows that you couldn’t make?
3. Let children discuss how they would teach this skill to other children.
4. With the help of your leader, practice teaching others to make hand shadows. 5. Teach someone how to make two or more hand shadows.

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Supporting Answers

1. Create light and shadow indoors with a flashlight attached to the back of a high-back chair, overhead projector, or lamp. Shine a light on the wall, screen, or bed sheet that is stretched tight. Hand shadows can be done outside with natural sunlight and a backdrop of your choice.
2. Discuss the questions. Help them to understand how they learned best and that all people learn at different paces and in different ways.
3. Work with the children to develop rules for teaching others how to make hand shadows. Rules should include:
a. Asking the student how they learn best, such as listening to instruction, watching a leader, or doing it themselves.
b. Be patient.
c. Be kind and encouraging.
d. Congratulate them when completed.
4. Parent assistance would allow one-on-one attention for each child as they practice teaching.
5. Teach hand shadows to another child or an adult.

Updated in: 2004

Grade 3
- 36 -

Handicraft
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements

1. Make six of the following:
a. A get-well card
b. A dry or silk flower arrangement
c. Bread dough or clay figure
d. A shell picture
e. A string sculpture
f. A mobile
g. An item from paper-mache
h. A picture using egg shells, seeds, or sea shells
i. A cover for an autograph or photo album
j. A collage using six different materials
k. A poster inviting people to an event
l. An article of your own choosing, neatly done
2. Give at least two of the above items to:
a. A family member or friend
b. An elderly person in your church or community

- 37 -

Supporting Answers

NOTE: Encourage neatness and originality of design in all projects.

1. Make six of the following:
a. Use paper, lace, etc. to decorate a card. Include a get-well message and give the card to someone who is ill.
b. Collect silk or dried natural flowers for arrangements.
c. Encourage each child to be creative as they bake and paint.
d. Design a picture using shells and glue. Display at a club or school meeting. e. Use a simple pattern to make a string art project.
f. Design and make a mobile. Use at least three patterns.
g. Use paper-mache to make a model of an animal or car.
h. Glue objects to cardboard to make a design. Paint it if desired.
i. Cover an autograph or photo album neatly with material.
j. Make a collage using a variety of materials such as felt, wool, cotton, straw, bark, dried flowers, etc.
k. The poster should be colorful and easy to read.
l. You may choose to have the Adventurers make the same craft item or give them several choices.
2. You may need to arrange transportation so the Adventurers can present gifts personally.

Updated in: 1996

Grade 2
- 38 -

Magnet Fun I
Originated in: North American Division

Requirements

1. What is a magnet made of?
2. Read the Greek story/legend of how the first magnet was found and named. 3. Describe the three main types of magnets:
a. Permanent magnets
b. Temporary magnets
c. Electromagnets
4. What are magnets used for?
5. Complete three magnet experiments, such as those listed below:
a. Magnet treasure hunt: Place objects around the room that will and will not magnetize. See how many different objects they can pick up with their magnet. Suggestions: nuts, bolts, tin foil, safety pins, etc.
b. Mineral rocks with iron: Lay various mineral rocks on a table and see if children can select the ones with iron in them and then try to pick them up with their magnet. (See resource #2)
c. Move an object with a magnet: Have a friend hold a sheet of paper between his/her two hands, place paper clip on top of the paper and a magnet below. Move the paper clip from one end to the other and back again with your hand. Repeat this experiment by having your friend hold a plastic ruler, mirror, cardboard, etc. instead of paper. Did it work?
d. Create a magnet: Stroke a steel nail against the magnet 25-30 times.
Stroke it in only one direction.
i. How many paper clips can you pick up at one time? ii. Is the nail as strong as your magnet?
6. Read and memorize Hebrews 7:19 and James 4:8.

- 39 -

Supporting Answers

1. A magnet is made of magnetite, a natural magnetic material that will create a magnetic field. A magnetic field is the force surrounding a magnet that draws objects to the magnet. You can feel this force when using a magnet.
2. Many years ago there was a shepherd named Magnes. Each day he kept watch over his flocks. One cold, blustery day, one of Magnes’ lambs was missing from its mothers’ side. Neither Magnes nor the mother could locate the little lamb. He looked behind rocks, in the thicket, near the stream, behind the bushes, and soon he realized it was really lost.
He didn’t believe a wild animal had stolen it or eaten it. He was sure he could find it, if only he looked in all the right places. He stood on a large rock so he could look upon the landscape of the pasture in hopes of finding “whitey”, the lost little lamb. As Magnes stood on a rock, his sandals stuck to the rock where the nails in his sandals were located.
He had never noticed that strange power before. Over a period of days and weeks, he brought other metal objects to the “magic rock” and found that iron, regardless of the size, would stick to the “magic rock.”
He took some of the stone to his village and many people played with it.
It became known as “Magnes’ stone.” Today it bears part of his name in honor of his discovery: “Magnet.” We call his “magic” stone a lodestone, which is made of magnetite, a natural magnetic material.
3. (A) Permanent: when it is magnetized, it retains a level of magnetism.
(B) Temporary: acts like a permanent magnet when it is within a strong magnetic field, but loses its magnetism when the magnetic field disappears. (C) Electromagnet: a special wire that acts like a permanent magnet when electrical current is flowing in the wire. For more detail, see resource #1.
4. Refer to resource #1.

Updated in: 2006

Grade 3
- 40 -

Magnet Fun II
Originated in: North American Division

Requirements

1. Earn the Magnet Fun I Award.
2. Play with two magnets making them attract each other. Play with two magnets making them repel each other.
All magnets have a ____________________ and _______________________ pole.
Opposite poles attract each other, same poles repel each other.
3. Make an Electromagnet.
4. Use a compass to find all eight directions. Draw them on a Compass
Rose.
5. Make a compass using a magnet, pan of water, long sewing needle, cork slice (or waxed Paper), candle wax, and compass.
6. What happens when one drops a magnet?
7. Learn Proverbs 18:24.

- 41 -

Supporting Answers

Updated in: 2007

Grade 3
- 42 -

Media Critic
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements

1. Explain what is meant by the term media. Give four examples. Explain what is meant by the term critic.
2. Discuss three principles that help us form good reading, viewing, and listening habits.
3. Keep a log of the time you spend each day with the different types of media. Note whether the media is Christ-centered or secular. Do this for two weeks.
4. Do one of the following with an adult:
a. Watch TV
b. Read a story
c. Listen to a tape
5. Become a “Media Critic” and discuss together the good and bad points of each.
6. With an adult, use a television guide, book club listing, etc., to choose what you could watch or read.
7. Listen to the beginning of a short story and add your own ending.

- 43 -

Supporting Answers

NOTE: This award is one of the requirements for the Builder Class.

1. Media are forms of communication that reach a large number of people, such as newspapers and magazines, television, films and videos, books, radio, and musical recordings. Explain to the Adventurers that any form of media in itself is neutral, and that it can be used for good or bad.
Explain that in today’s society, children and adults will be bombarded by media messages; it is hard to avoid being affected by what we see and hear and read. That’s why it is important to learn to control the media by choosing what is good and helpful.
2. Read Philippians 4:8 together and encourage the Adventurers to use it as a guideline in making choices about what they do and see. Explain and discuss these principles with the Adventurers, and ask them to tell you what they have learned from this Bible verse.
3. Teach the Adventurers to be aware of time spent with Jesus compared to time spent on secular activities. Help each child make a chart to keep track of his or her viewing and reading activities for at least two weeks.
4. Encourage the Adventurers to select a story or program that they feel will meet the standards of Philippians 4:8. Help them understand that you cannot always tell by reading a review or advertisement if it will be good by Jesus’ standards. When you begin reading or viewing, if it is not proper, stop! Find something else. Encourage the children to make good choices. 5. Early selection helps us realize how much time we spend on these activities and helps us to be more selective.
6. Reinforce the principles of good reading and viewing habits as the
Adventurers complete the story. Encourage imagination!

Updated in: 1996

Grade 3
- 44 -

Music Maker
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

Discuss guidelines for Christians to follow in choosing music.
Name and identify six different musical instruments.
Make a scrapbook, poster, or collage showing musical instruments.
Name three musical instruments mentioned in the Bible.
Demonstrate how to play a musical instrument.
Learn two songs and play or sing them, OR participate in a rhythm band or participate in making music with family or friends.

- 45 -

Supporting Answers

1. Would Jesus listen to this music? Does the music glorify God? Read
Messages to Young People, pages 292-296, and share the concepts you read with the Adventurers.
2. Examples are piano, trumpet, clarinet, cymbals, flute, saxophone, etc.
Encourage inclusion of instru­ ents in common use in your part of the m world.
3. Use pictures of musical instruments drawn by the Adventurer or cut from magazines to make a poster or collage.
4. Some examples are:
a. Exodus 28:33, 34 – Bells
b. 1 Kings 10:12 – Harp
c. Isaiah 30:29 - Flute
d. 1 Chronicles 15:16 – Cymbals
e. Isaiah 5:12 – Clarinet
f. Numbers 10:1-10 – Trumpet
5. Practice and play a simple instrument such as a recorder, kazoo, harmonica etc., OR piano, violin, or other instrument the children are learning to play. Make this fun. Use simple instruments for those who may be less musical yet can enjoy a joyful noise. Create your own musical instrument.
6. Learn two new songs together and sing or play them for others, OR use rhythm instruments or kitchen utensils to make “music” together. Play together and practice for playing for others.

Updated in:

Grade
- 46 -

1

My Picture Book
Originated in: North American Division

Requirements

1. Make a picture book of at least six pages.
a. All pages must have some form of decoration.
b. Describe each picture in the book.
2. Memorize Joel 1:3 and discuss the meaning.
3. Share your picture book with others and explain why you picked these pictures. Did sharing your book help you understand Joel 1:3?

- 47 -

Supporting Answers

1. Create a family picture book or choose any subject, object, or theme as the basis for your book. Include photos, magazine pictures, and/or drawings. 2. Use a variety of materials to decorate the book such as: colored or printed paper, stickers, punch-outs, decorative scissors, buttons, foam cut-outs, embellishments, beads, etc.
3. Provide a short description of the picture.
4. May choose different Bible versions such as, KJV, NKJV, Clear Word, etc.
5. Share your book with family, club, school, or with friends.

Updated in: 2005

Grade 4
- 48 -

Postcards
Originated in: North American Division

Requirements

1. What is a postcard? How is it different from a letter? Tell about the Pony
Express. Memorize the first part of Esther 3:13, KJV.
2. Learn and recite three or four facts about postcards.
3. How much did it cost to mail a postcard when it was first issued? How much does it cost to send a postcard today?
4. Write and send four postcards to people you know.
5. Make, decorate, and send a card to a missionary school or church. On your church bulletin board, display what country it was sent to and how much it cost to send?
6. Do at least two of the following:
a. Visit a post office
b. Invite a post office employee to come and give a presentation
c. Make your own post office using shoe boxes or other mail box dividers d. Discuss what happens at a post office
e. Collect three antique post cards
f. Your choice
7. Learn the stories about Joseph Bates and James White’s visits to the post office. Read and discuss how to begin a greeting in 1Timothy 1:2 &
Philemon 1:1 & Philippians 1:2.

- 49 -

Supporting Answers

1. A postcard is a single piece of cardstock mailed without an envelope.
The Pony Express was the first cross country letter carrier. Look up more information on the internet. “And the letters were sent post…”
Esther 3:13 KJV.
2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Postcard.
3. John P. Charlton of Philadelphia patented the postcard in 1861, selling the rights to H. L. Lipman, whose postcards, complete with a decorated border, were labeled “Lipman’s postal card.” Nine years later, European countries were also producing postcards.
4. May send postcards to other Adventurers in your club, family, friends, or a missionary of your director’s choosing in another country. You may make your own cards out of old greeting cards by cutting off the cover and using the back of the cover to write the message and address. Make sure each postcard meets the post office standards for size and weight
5. Chart information such as: when it was sent; how much it cost; the date the card arrived; who all might have read the card.
6. Be creative and have fun.
7. Tell how God provided funds for mailing documents when there was a need for money.
8. Other Bible texts: 2 Peter 3:1 and 2 Corinthians 13:10.

Updated in: 2007

Grade 3
- 50 -

Reporter
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements

1. Give a report to your parents about an Adventurer function.
2. Make a reporter scrapbook that includes at least three Adventurer outings. 3. Watch or listen to the news for one week and prepare a short report on the major news items.
4. Listen to announcements at church and read the church bulletin.
a. Put bulletin announcements in your scrapbook.
b. Circle the events you were most interested in.
5. Talk with your pastor or Sabbath school teacher. In your scrapbook include: a. A drawing of the person (include name and tell where he or she works) b. Describe what he or she likes best about his or her work.
6. Keep your reporter scrapbook for at least two months.

- 51 -

Supporting Answers

1. Have a sharing time in your Adventurer meeting so each child will have practice in sharing a “report” with others. Help them learn to put events in order, and encourage them to tell their parents about an Adventurer function. Start a simple “Reporter” scrapbook. Let each child design a cover with his or her name on it. Typing paper or unlined notebook paper would be appropriate. To get started, give the children a copy of an Adventurer announcement to place in their scrapbooks.
2. Make a scrapbook story using magazine pictures or pictures the
Adventurer has drawn and colored. A sibling, parent, or friend may need to help. Have the children print captions below the pictures to describe the items. Have the children share what they learned.
3. Encourage the Adventurers to listen to news on radio or television to know what is going on in the community and the world.
4. Have the Adventurers tell you about the announcements and the church bulletin. Ask which were most interesting to the children.
5. Help each Adventurer set up an appointment for an interview with a pastor, Sabbath school teacher, or school teacher. Prepare those adults for participation in this activity.
6. Work on the “Reporter” scrapbook for at least two months. Add clippings of interesting school, church, and community activities. This may be a group activity, but each child should make his or her own scrapbook. Updated in: 1996

Grade 4
- 52 -

Sign Language
Originated in: North American Division

Requirements

1. Learn the manual alphabet used by the deaf and the rules pertaining to it. 2. Learn how to send and receive words using the manual alphabet.
3. Learn at least fifty words.
4. Learn and present at least one simple Christian song.
5. Where possible, have the Adventurers meet a deaf person and sign with them. 6. Sign a simple Bible verse.

- 53 -

Supporting Answers

1. As available (from your local Association of the Deaf), use the two-sided manual alphabet cards. That way the children can see what the signs look like from both the sender’s and receiver’s angle.
2. First they can have fun learning to spell their names. Print words on a sheet of paper, and then have the children take turns spelling and receiving the words. Have children get in groups of two and send and receive words of their choice.
3. Words young people really like to learn are the animals and foods. Joy of Signing is a good book to learn these signs, as well as the other signs.
It gives both a word and a picture description of each sign. It also tells the sign’s origin (example: Jesus—origin: indicating the nail prints).
4. “Jesus Loves Me” and “Into My Heart” are two examples. Remember to explain the origins when needed.
5. Have someone from your deaf community come in and share a bit of their life with the children and teach them a few words. This will really bring this award to life.

Updated in: 1996

Grade 4
- 54 -

Stamping Fun Art
Originated in: North American Division

Requirements

1. What letter did God send to us?
a. Memorize: Exodus 32:16 KJV
b. Read Exodus 34:4 and Esther 3:10
c. Was there something stamped or written in the two above texts?
2. Find in the Bible three or more people who wrote a letter to personal friends or churches.
3. Name a few projects you can do using rubber stamps.
4. What material do you need to do a rubber stamp project?
5. Learn and demonstrate three to five stamping techniques such as suggested below:
a. Two step stamping
b. Decorating with chalk
c. Decorating with markers
d. Using water color pencils
e. Masking image
6. Explain how to care for rubber stamps.
7. Make three different projects to give to a friend or family members.

Supporting Answers

1. The Bible; God’s second book is nature.
2. In the New Testament: Paul, James, Peter, and Jude wrote letters to friends and churches.
3. You can use rubber stamps for art projects that show love, appreciation, and creativity through:
a. Handmade greeting cards
b. Book marks, tags, decorating paper, bags to wrap gifts
c. Scrap booking supplies
4. Basic Materials:
White card or different colors of craft cards, rubber stamps, stamp pads, Versa mark pad, stamping sponges, sponge tip applicators, Q-tips.
Stamp cleaner, stamping chalks, markers, water color pencils, blender pen, glue stick or pen, double stick adhesive tape, mounting squares, glitter, punches, decorative ribbons.
- 55 -

5. Stamping techniques:
a. Two step stamping: stamp the base image with lighter ink and overlay or adjoining image with darker ink
b. Decorating with chalk: stamp image with a Versa mark inkpad or whisper craft stamping pad, then apply chalk color using sponge tip or cotton swab to fill in color.
c. Decorating with markers: use different colored markers to apply color directly to the stamp, blow onto the ink image to remoisten the ink with your breath before stamping onto paper. d. Using water color pencils: Stamp image onto paper. Outline a section of the stamped image with a water color pencil, then use a damp brush or blend pen to move color where desired.
e. Masking image: stamp image on cardstock, stamp it again on a piece of scratch paper. Cut carefully around the scratch paper image cutting just inside the lines, this will be the mask. Place the mask on top of the cardstock image and stamp the desired image over the mask.
Remove the mask so the new image will “disappear” behind the first one. 6. Clean the stamps after each use, especially the changing colors. Use a stamp cleaner bottle with scrubber or roll-on applicator top. A cellulose sponge works best because it does not break down. The sponge may be dampened with plain water, or add 1 or 2 drops of dish soap to the water, then blot dry with paper towel. Alcohol-free baby wipes also work well for cleaning stamps. Never soak rubber stamps in water or use oil based solvent to clean the stamps.

Updated in: 2008

Grade 4
- 56 -

Tin Can Fun
Originated in: North American Division

Requirements
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

What is the earliest known use of tin and how is it used today?
Play the “Mystery Can Fun” game.
Keep a record of how many cans your family uses in a week.
How were things preserved in Jesus’ day?
How was tin used in Bible times?
Make a telephone or stilts with tin cans.
Bring three cans of food to donate.

- 57 -

Supporting Answers

1. The earliest known use of tin was around 3500 B.C. when the people of
Ur (now Iraq) made bronze articles. Bronze is an alloy of tin and copper.
Today, tin is used mainly in the production of “tin plate,” which is steel coated on both sides with an extremely thin film of tin. Tin cans are made of “tin plate.”
2. Remove labels from a few cans and guess their contents.
3. Share results with the club.
4. Things were preserved by drying them out with salt. Dried fish, figs, and other fruits were common. Today most of the “tin plate” is used to coat the steel cans to give them an attractive appearance and protect the cans from rust. These cans are for packing food and other items that would quickly spoil.
5. Bronze is an alloy of tin. Offerings were brought of bronze; (Exodus
25:3). Fifty bronze clasps for the tabernacle were made; (Exodus
26:11). Moses made a bronze serpent and put it on a pole (Numbers
21:9).
6. To make a telephone: Poke a small hole in the bottom of two empty
(and clean) cans. Put one end of a long string into each can end and tie a knot. Stretch the string tight and talk. One person will talk while the other person listens to create a “telephone.” God communicates with us like the telephone. We cannot see Him, but He is always ready to listen and help us. To make stilts: Poke a small hole on the two sides at the top of two cans. Tie a string to each can to create “stilts.” For stilt safety, use cans no smaller than 20 oz. and always wear shoes. “And walk in love...”
Ephesians 5:2.

Updated in: 2003

Grade 3
- 58 -

Troubadour
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements

1. Play a song on a simple instrument, OR mark the rhythm of a tune with a tambourine, triangle, etc.
2. Act out a character or animal with costume or gestures so the group may recognize it.
3. With the group, act out a story or sing a song.
4. Sing two traditional songs of your country.
5. With a few friends, organize fifteen minutes of entertainment for a group, OR tell a story to a group.
6. Find, read, and explain the meaning of Psalm 66:1-2.

- 59 -

Supporting Answers

1. Use a reed pipe, flute, harmonica, recorder, piano, etc.
2. Encourage the Adventurers to use their imaginations and creativity.
3. Help the Adventurers share and take turns. Encourage group singing as well as individual talents.
4. Teach the Adventurers some traditional songs. If your group includes children from many nationalities, learn songs of different countries and sing them as a group. Encourage parents to teach songs of their childhood to their children.
5. Encourage the Adventurers to work together and organize a program. If you are working with an individual, have him or her tell you a story.
6. Discuss the verses together and decide how you can make a joyful
“noise.”

Updated in: 1996

Grade 3
- 60 -

- 61 -

- 62 -

Title

Year

Creator

Page

Cooking Fun

unknown

GC

65

Courtesy

unknown

GC

67

Gardener

unknown

GC

69

Home Craft

unknown

GC

71

Home Helper

1996

GC

73

Hygiene

1996

GC

75

Sewing Fun

1996

GC

77

- 63 -

- 64 -

Cooking Fun
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements

1. Name the four basic food groups.
a. Collect pictures of foods in each of these groups.
b. Use your pictures to make a collage or poster to be displayed at club, school, or church.
2. Compose a complete dinner menu.
3. Help prepare, serve, and clean up after a full dinner.
4. Make a batch of cookies of your choice.
5. Demonstrate how to make a fire outside and use it to prepare a hot drink, OR make two different kinds of sandwiches, OR prepare two different salads.
6. Help prepare a picnic lunch and pack it carefully. Share this picnic with family or friends.

- 65 -

Supporting Answers

1. Different groups:
a. Vegetable-fruit group: Citrus fruits, tomatoes, peppers, melons, cabbage, berries, dark-green or deep-yellow vegetables, potatoes, etc. b. Bread-cereal group: Breads, cereals and other grain products made from whole, enriched or restored grains such as rice, wheat, oats, barley, corn, etc.
c. Protein group: Dried beans, dried peas, lentils, garbanzos, nuts, peanuts, peanut butter, eggs, soy cheese, and vegetable proteins.
d. Milk group: Whole, evaporated, or skim milk, reconstituted dry milk, buttermilk, soybean milk, cottage cheese, yogurt, ice cream.
e. Resources: Magazines and seed catalogs
2. A complete dinner menu will include soup, salad, entree, vegetables and desert as well as beverage and bread.
3. This dinner can be the result of requirement two.
4. Help the child make a simple batch of cookies. You may follow a recipe or use a prepared mix.
5. Clear around the campfire and use safety rules when building the fire;
OR make two sandwich fillings or use prepared items such as jam, peanut butter, etc.; OR make a simple relish dish and/or a tossed or jelled salad.
6. Prepare a picnic lunch and eat it with your group, even if it is just under a nearby tree.

Updated in:

Grade 2
- 66 -

Courtesy
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements
1.
2.
3.
4.

Explain what courtesy means.
Explain the Golden Rule.
Learn and demonstrate good table manners.
Demonstrate how to answer the phone correctly. Demonstrate good telephone manners by:
a. Making a telephone call to an adult
b. Making a telephone call to a friend of your choice

c. Introduce an adult to a friend.
d. Introduce your teacher to a parent.
5. Share an experience about a time:
a. When an adult was courteous to you
b. When you were courteous to another person
6. Show acts of courtesy as you
a. Ask for a drink
b. Say thank you
c. Apologize
d. Greet a friend
e. Share and take turns

OR

- 67 -

Supporting Answers

1. To be courteous is to show consideration to others by using good manners and proper behavior. Demonstrate examples of courteous behavior. 2. The Golden Rule is a precept, or rule of life, set forth by Jesus Christ in the Sermon on the Mount and recorded in Matthew 7:12. In different versions it is stated as “Do to others what you want done to you.”
3. Encourage good manners by having a pretend meal, with table setting, showing the children proper table etiquette such as not talking with food in your mouth, using fork and spoon correctly, saying please and thank you, etc. You may wish to have a “banquet” for the Adventurers so they can put into practice what they have learned.
4. Teach the Adventurers to speak distinctly when they answer the telephone, to ask the caller whom they wish to speak with, and to relay the message quickly. Be sure the child knows how to call for help in case of an emergency. If telephones are not available, teach the Adventurer how to make introductions properly.
5. Give the Adventurers a few minutes to tell their story. You may need to share an experience to get them started. Encourage the children to be kind to one another as well as to adults.

Updated in:

Grade 2
- 68 -

Gardener
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Describe what a gardener does.
Name three different types of gardens and tell what grows in each.
Find at least two places in the Bible where a garden is mentioned.
List at least three tools you need for gardening.
Demonstrate how to use garden tools properly and how to take care of them after use.
6. Do one of the following:
a. Take care of a small plot of land-sowing, transplanting, planting and cultivating flowers or vegetables.
b. Plant and care for three different plants using a window box, flower pot, milk carton, or can.
c. Make a terrarium and care for it.

- 69 -

Supporting Answers

1. A gardener cultivates the soil, plants seeds and sets plants, and feeds, waters, weeds, transplants, and cares for the garden.
2. Vegetable garden: foods such as peas, carrots, beans, etc.
a. Flower Garden: bulb and seed flowers, such as tulips or pansies.
b. Herb Garden: plants for cooking such as parsley, thyme, or mint.
3. Genesis 2:8, Eden; John 18:1 and Matthew 26:36, Gethsemane.
4. Some garden tools often needed are a shovel, rake, hoe, trowel, hose, and wheelbarrow.
5. Discuss safety. For example, to prevent injury, never leave tools where a person may step on or fall over them. Wipe tools clean and store them in a dry place.
6. Teach the Adventurers to enjoy the feel of soil, the excitement of watching things grow, and the responsibility to care for a garden by weeding and watering. The third option may be a group project. If it is selected, help the children choose an attractive variety of plants for the terrarium. Updated in:

Grade 2
- 70 -

Home Craft
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements

1. Use any available materials from around your home to do one of the following: a. Design and build a sculpture.
b. Make a picture from household items or foods.
2. Do or make three of the following:
a. A knitted piece
b. A crocheted piece (dishcloth, mat, etc.)
c. A net piece (string bag, ball bag, etc.)
d. A piece in raffia or straw or plastic (coaster, napkin ring, etc.)
e. A piece of sewing (doll clothes, apron, etc.)
f. Thread a needle and sew on buttons.
3. Cover a bottle to be used as a vase, OR design and make a “refrigerator” magnet. 4. Make two items from things that are usually thrown away.
5. Start a collection of “throw-away” home items that may be used for craft projects. - 71 -

Supporting Answers

1. Do the following:
a. Using cardboard as a base, take glue and toothpicks and build a tower, animal, or other design of the Adventurer’s choice. Size will depend on the child’s patience.
b. Be creative. Use seeds, buttons, etc., to make a picture.
2. This is a great opportunity for the family or club to work together on a project of their choice.
3. Cut small pieces of construction paper or pictures from a magazine.
Cover bottle or jar with glue and place paper or pictures on it, pressing smooth. Cover lightly with glue and let dry before using. Makes an attractive gift for Mother’s Day or add flowers and give to a shut-in. OR
Let the children design and make with felts or other scrap material, buttons, etc., a magnet for the refrigerator, stove, or other surface to which a magnet will adhere.
4. Be creative. Encourage the Adventurers to make something unusual from items such as egg cartons, shoe boxes, cereal cartons, scrap paper or cloth, bottle can, etc.
5. Collect bottle caps, milk or egg cartons, popsicle sticks, cardboard, nut shells, lint, bottles, cans, material scraps, etc. (Vacation Bible School teachers’ guides contain good craft ideas.) Teach the children to save and store items they could use again for inexpensive craft projects. Be prepared to give examples of types of items to save. Encourage use of these items so they will not be thrown away. Be creative!

Updated in:

Grade 3
- 72 -

Home Helper
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements

1. Assist with two of the following:
a. Laundry
b. Preparing and serving a meal
c. Washing car
d. Grocery shopping
2. Set the table and help do the dishes four times in one week.
3. Make your bed and help to clean your room for three weeks.
4. Demonstrate your ability to do four of the following:
a. Vacuum the carpet or beat a rug
b. Dust furniture
c. Sweep or mop
d. Tell the time
e. Sew on a button
f. Pick up your own things and put them away
5. Be responsible for emptying the waste baskets or trash container for one week. Separate all recyclable materials.
6. Discuss the following and learn to do each one:
a. Dust window sills
b. Remove spider webs
c. Wash windows
d. Clean woodwork
e. Vacuum or sweep the floor

- 73 -

Supporting Answers

1. Work is always more fun when shared. Teach the Adventurers to be helpful at home by assisting a parent or sibling.
2. Teach the Adventurers to set a table properly: fork to left of plate, knife and spoon to right, cup or glass on right above knife, napkin folded and set on plate or left of fork. Teach them to do dishes safely and to do their tasks willingly.
3. Adventurers may need assistance with bed making and keeping their rooms clean, but they definitely need to be taught these important responsibilities and good habits.
4. Household chores can be fun and are encouraged as ways a child can have a part in keeping the home clean. Learning to dust, sweep, and vacuum safely without causing more dust is important.
5. Teach the children to help empty wastebaskets and to place contents in larger trash container. Talk about how trash can be separated into glass, cans, and paper for recycling.
6. You may set up a “house” during Adventurer time. Encourage the children to work together to clean the “house” and show them how to perform necessary tasks neatly. Woodwork and window sills need to be dusted with a clean cloth or, if washable paint, a damp cloth. Place a clean rag or pillow slip over a broom to remove spider webs. Use water or window cleaner with clean cloth or paper towels to clean windows.

Updated in: 1996

Grade
- 74 -

1

Hygiene
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

Find, read, and discuss Psalm 119:11, Proverbs 25:11, and Psalm 19:14.
Learn about personal cleanliness.
Tell three important times when we should wash our hands.
Practice the proper way to brush your teeth.
Discuss regular bathing and how to keep your hair clean.
Tell how many glasses of water you should drink daily.
Tell why it is important to keep your clothing clean.
Help keep your house clean for one week.
Help with the laundry at home for one week.

- 75 -

Supporting Answers

1. Discuss the importance of using kind and “clean” words as Jesus would have us do. Locate the texts, read them together, and discuss what each means. 2. Make it interesting while you learn; remember that many may not be taught the basics of cleanliness at home. Play games, sing songs, or make posters to instill the basic principles. You may choose to see a video, read a book, or have a health specialist come talk with the
Adventurers.
3. Teach the importance of clean hands before eating, after going to the rest room, and before handling food. If possible, have the Adventurers use a microscope to look at their hands. Have them wash with soap as they would normally wash, place their hands under a microscope again, wash carefully again and look at the difference.
4. Brush your teeth for two minutes, at least twice each day. Eat a balanced diet, cut back on sugary and starchy foods, and don’t chew on hard substances such as ice or popcorn kernels. Have a dentist or dental hygienist demonstrate proper brushing. (Sometimes they will give each child a toothbrush or other tooth care items).
5. A clean body is healthier. Share with the children some problems that might occur if they do not keep clean (lice, colds, infections, etc.) Play beauty shop and show how to wash hair properly, then dry and comb it.
You may wish to have a beauty operator discuss and demonstrate good health habits for hair and hands.
6. The outside of our bodies need water to keep us clean and the inside of our bodies need water to keep us healthy. We need to drink at least eight glasses of water each day. Discuss how God made the Adventurers’ bodies. 7. It is important to keep our clothing clean so we will look and feel healthy. After playing or working and becoming dirty it is important to bathe and put on clean clothing.
8. Have the Adventurers work with their parents or another adult to do things to keep their house clean and neat.
9. Have the children work with their parents or another adult to do the laundry. Updated in: 1996

Grade 4
- 76 -

Sewing Fun
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

Tell what the first sewing needles were probably made of.
Describe what was probably first used as thread.
Tell when sewing machines first came into existence.
Demonstrate how to thread a needle and knot the end of the thread.
Sew a button onto a piece of cloth.
Sew two snaps or press studs and connect them properly.
Sew a hook and eye and connect them properly.
Demonstrate the ability to sew three different types of stitches, such as the following:
a. Baste or running stitch
b. Hem stitch
c. Back stitch
9. Make a useful article using at least two different stitches.

- 77 -

Supporting Answers
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

The first sewing needles were probably made of bone.
Horse-tail or other animal hairs were probably the first thread.
Sewing machines were first used in the 1850s.
Demonstrate how to be safe when threading a needle. Have the
Adventurers practice tying a knot at the end of the thread.
Sew a button on a piece of material or clothing. Teach the Adventurer to make small, even stitches.
Demonstrate how to sew snaps on two pieces of material or clothing and connect them properly. Make small stitches without puckering the material. Demonstrate how to sew a hook-and-eye on material evenly.
Demonstrate how to make three kinds of stitches. Have the Adventurers try to make the stitches neat and even.
Some examples are:
a. Scissor holder: Cut the pattern, place material together, and stitch by hand, making even, neat stitches. Include loop at top of scissor container for hanging.
b. Pin cushion: Fill pin cushion with sand or small seeds.

Updated in: 1996

Grade 3
- 78 -

- 79 -

- 80 -

Title

Year

Creator

Page

unknown

GC

83

Butterfly

2003

NAD

85

Environmentalist

1996

NAD

87

Feathered Friends

1996

GC

89

Fish

2004

NAD

91

unknown

GC

93

Friend of Animals

1996

NAD

95

Friend of Nature

unknown

NAD

97

Geologist

Astronomer

Flowers

unknown

GC

99

Habitat

2003

NAD

101

Honey

2008

NAD

103

Honeybee

2008

NAD

105

Ladybugs

2005

NAD

107

Lizards

2005

NAD

109

unknown

GC

111

Trees

1996

GC

113

Whale

2003

NAD

115

Outdoor Explorer

- 81 -

- 82 -

Astronomer
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements

1. Name several stargazers of the Bible.
2. Identify one planet, two stars, and three constellations in the sky at night and give their correct names.
3. Make a constellation peep box.
4. Explain the difference between a planet and a star.
5. Observe planets and stars in the night sky.
6. Observe two of the following and make a crayon resist:
a. moon rise
b. sunrise
c. sunset
7. Find three texts in the Bible that refer to the heavens.

- 83 -

Supporting Answers

1. Adam and Eve (Education, page 21); Abraham (Genesis 15:5); Joseph
(Education, page 52); Jesus (SDA Commentary, Volume 5, page 1117);
Moses (Patriarchs & Prophets, page 475); Wise Men (Matthew 2:2).
2. Go out at night to observe the sky and draw a picture of the planet, stars, and the constellations you saw. When possible, visit a planetarium. 3. Take a small shoe box, oatmeal box, etc. Have the children choose which constellation they wish to make. Draw the constellation on the outside end of the container. Poke a small hole where each star is located. Turn to other end and cut two medium eye-size holes to peek into. Hold peep box to light and view the constellations. Encourage variety in the constellations so when finished each child may guess which one he/she is viewing.
4. Observe and recognize some prominent stars and constellations. A star is a single body, such as the North Star. A constellation is a group of stars, such as the Big Dipper. Some of the brightest stars are Polaris,
Castor, Regulus, Deneb, Altair, Rigel, Capella, and Vega; Orion, Leo, Libra,
Lyra, Virgo, Taurus, Ursa Major, Ursa Minor, and Canis Major and Minor are a few of the constellations. Choose several of each, locating ones that are easiest to find and identify in your area during the time of year you are taking the class.
5. Go away from city lights to view the night sky, Or watch a program, video, etc. on the sky. Spend the night. Enjoy!
6. Observe the sky at sunrise, sunset, and/or moon rise. Make it a fun time together to watch the wonder of God’s large lights.
7. A Bible concordance lists many texts. Choose, read, and explain. e.g.,
Genesis 1:16, Deuteronomy 10:22, Isaiah 13:10, Matthew 2:10.

Updated in:

Grade 3
- 84 -

Butterfly
Originated in: North American Division

Requirements
1.
2.
3.
4.

Learn how butterflies live and eat.
Collect pictures, stickers or photos of butterflies that live in your state.
Discuss and draw the life cycle of the butterfly.
Memorize John 3:7 and discuss the story of Nicodemus in John
a. Make one of the following crafts:
b. A butterfly on the sidewalk with chalk.
c. A torn construction paper picture of a butterfly.
d. A butterfly in the sand or snow.
e. A butterfly mobile.
f. A butterfly magnet.
g. A butterfly made with beads.
h. A butterfly made of colored tissue clipped together with a clothes pin. 5. Learn a song about butterflies.

- 85 -

Supporting Answers

1. The butterfly is solitary except during migration, gathering on the damp ground to find water or nocturnal roosting. Your may see male butterflies circling around each other to defend their territory.
Butterflies and moths have a “coiled up drinking straw” below their heads called a proboscis. It is used to draw up nectar, water and other liquids. The length of the proboscis helps determine from which flowers they take nectar. Each type of butterfly picks flowers and usually stay on the same level, either low to the ground or higher. Very seldom will butterflies drink from flowers that face down.
2. Check with your library.
3. (A) Egg; (B) Larva or caterpillar; (C) Pupa or chrysalis; (D) Adult.
4. (Put your hands flat together in front of you, as in prayer. Open and close the top of your hands like a butterfly’s wings) When a butterfly sits and opens and closes its wings it warms its muscles and takes energy from the sun and stores it in its body. When we pray to Jesus we feel warm and good inside and we receive energy from Him to be happy, strong and do what is right. Continue to move your hands like a butterfly as we pray.
5. Option: “If I were a butterfly, I’d thank the Lord for my mighty fine wings...” Updated in: 2003

Grade
- 86 -

1

Environmentalist
Originated in: North American Division

Requirements

1. Recite Genesis 1:26. Explain our role in protecting wildlife.
2. List three animals that are endangered and explain why.
3. List three birds that are endangered and explain how you can help protect birds.
4. Study endangered trees in your area. Plant or adopt a tree.
5. In your area:
a. What causes pollution? List ways you can prevent pollution.
b. Investigate how and why the pollution was caused.
c. Explain how you can keep from polluting water.
d. What dangers threaten the quality of air?
6. Participate in one of the following community activities to help clean the environment:
a. Take part in Earth Day events.
b. Help clear the trash from a roadside or stream with your group.
c. Help collect paper, cans, or other materials for recycling.
7. Create a mural of the earth made new.

- 87 -

Supporting Answers

1. Discover your responsibility to help care for God’s world.
2. Draw pictures of and list endangered animals in your area. Check the library for current listings.
3. Ways to protect birds: Do not harm with sticks, rocks, or guns; never bother or destroy their nests or eggs.
4. Learn about endangered trees and what causes them to die. Plant or adopt a tree. (Call City Hall if you need help in learning where your community needs a tree.) Or find a green plant and care for it.
5. Help prevent pollution by: turning off lights, recycling paper, plastics, glass, aluminum cans, using white paper goods, not wasting water, not polluting our water with trash, human, or chemical waste. Have children make a poster depicting what they have learned.
6. Read together some verses from Rev. 21, 22, and Isa. 11:6.

Updated in: 1996

Grade 4
- 88 -

Feathered Friends
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Tell how God cares for birds.
Make a simple bird feeder or pinecone feeder.
Be able to recognize ten different birds.
Play a bird game.
Draw and/or color pictures of the following:
a. two water birds
b. two seed eaters
c. one predator
6. Be able to make five bird sounds.
7. Make a Christmas tree or an Easter basket for birds.
8. Observe some live birds, imitate their movements, and collect feathers whenever possible. Keep in mind that keeping the feathers of migratory birds is illegal in some, if not all, U.S. states.

- 89 -

Supporting Answers

1. Discuss God’s care, citing Matthew 10:28, 31, and Luke 12:24. God created birds to care for themselves (feathers, beak, migration, etc.).
2. Make a simple milk-carton bird feeder by cutting the milk carton so seeds may be placed inside or make a pinecone feeder by rolling a pine cone in peanut butter and bird seed. Hang your feeder so the birds may enjoy their treat.
3. Whenever possible, include birds from your locality. Play recognition games using pictures or flashcards. Invite a local museum or Audubon
Society representative to make a presentation.
4. Possible games include: Bird lotto, dominoes, or a birds card game available from your Adventist Book Center.
5. Resources: a teacher supply store, coloring books, magazines, books or videos. 6. Check your public library or Audubon Society for tapes. Select birds that have distinct habits and sounds such as owls, doves, crows, chickadees, killdeer, whippoorwills, etc.
7. Tie bird seeds and fruits to a tree as a special treat for the birds.
Decorate an Easter basket (berry basket) with materials that the birds could use for building their nests such as hair, yarn, string, etc. Hang basket where the birds can borrow materials for nesting.
8. Go to the zoo, aviary, park, or neighborhood birding area to observe and collect feathers (see note above). In class, act out bird movements.

Updated in: 1996

Grade 2
- 90 -

Fish
Originated in: North American Division

Requirements

1. Find three of the “fish stories” in the Bible:
a. Loaves and fishes (Mark 6:34-44 and Matthew 14:13-21)
b. Father knows best (Luke 11:11-13)
c. Jonah (Jonah 1-2)
d. Breakfast with Jesus (John 21:8-113)
e. Fishers of men (Matthew 4:18-22)
2. Learn how fish served an important part in providing food for the pilgrims. 3. Learn how to care for a pet fish.
4. Learn about two fish that live in a lake or ocean that is closest to you and how to protect them.
5. Play a fish game or complete a fish craft.

- 91 -

Supporting Answers

1. Help the children find the scripture and review the stories.
2. See resources below on the Indian Squanto.
3. Ask someone who has a pet fish or works in a pet store to talk to the children, or get general fish care instructions from a pet store or library and discuss these with the children. Learn about care, food (when and what to feed a fish), and aquariums. Remember, our pet fish depend on us to care for them—they cannot care for themselves.
4. Learn about two types of fish that live naturally. Discuss how we can help by keeping the water clean. Never put garbage in lakes or the ocean. 5. Fish game:
a. Make a stick fishing pole with a string and magnet on the end. “Go fish” for goodies like little Bibles, stickers, gummie fish, etc.
b. Crafts: (also see resources below)
c. Make a paper plate aquarium: Use two paper plates, cut a round circle in one, put clear or blue-clear plastic wrap on it to make it look like a window into an aquarium. Place fish sticker and draw seaweed/plants on the uncut plate. Glue both plates together, so it is like an aquarium with see-through glass.
d. Felt fish: Prepare pre-cut felt fish shapes and have the children decorate them with sequins.

Updated in: 2004

Grade
- 92 -

1

Flowers
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements

1. Collect and press, photograph, or draw ten flowers of different colors and keep them in a book. Name the different kinds and tell where you found them.
2. Tell what attracts bees and insects to flowers, and what it is that the bees take from the flowers.
3. Describe three ways in which flower seeds are scattered.
4. Tell how you can help to protect our wild flowers.
5. Make a bookmark using dried flower petals.
6. Identify ten flowers that are grown in your area.
7. Take a bouquet of flowers to someone.
8. Show how to arrange flowers and keep a bouquet fresh for as long as possible. - 93 -

Supporting Answers

1. Look for your flowers in the fields or wooded areas, in wet places near rivers and ponds, or in your garden.
2. Colors, smells, and motion attract insects to flowers. Nectar, pollen, and water are taken from the flow­ rs. e 3. Flower seeds are scattered by birds, wind, insects, and animals. See your local agricultural department for help.
4. The best way to protect wild flowers is to leave them where you find them. If you do pick them, do not pull the roots out of the ground.
5. Pick and dry petals from several different flowers. Cut white paper 2” by 7” and arrange petals on it. Laminate with clear plastic and trim excess material. Your bookmark may be given as a gift for Mother’s Day, a birthday, etc.
6. Identify live flowers whenever possible. Flash cards, magazine or seed catalog pictures may be used, if necessary.
7. Pick a bouquet of garden flowers, arrange them nicely and take them to someone to make them happy, OR make a silk flower arrangement and share it (could be taken to Sabbath School).
8. Adding green leaves to flower arrangements can be attractive. Fresh flowers may be kept longer if you change the water daily and keep the flowers in a cool place.

Updated in:

Grade
- 94 -

1

Friend of Animals
Originated in: North American Division

Requirements

1. Do one of the following:
a. Take care of an animal or bird for four weeks.
i.
Feed it and be certain it has fresh water. ii. Keep its cage or resting place clean.
b. Put out food scraps or seed for animals or birds in your neighborhood. Keep careful watch for four weeks. iii. List and identify creatures that feed there. iv. Draw or color pictures of them.
2. Identify three different birds. Observe them and study their habits.
3. Identify and describe characteristics of three breeds of dogs and two breeds of cats.
4. Visit one of the following and write a report of what you do and see:
a. a zoo
b. a natural history museum
c. an aviary
d. a kennel
e. a farmyard
f. a pet shop
5. Set up a feeding station for birds or animals.
6. Play an animal game.

- 95 -

Supporting Answers

1. Help the Adventurers learn responsibility and proper care for a pet.
(You may purchase a group pet and have the Adventurers take turns caring for it.)
2. Teach the Adventurers to be observant of nature and where to obtain help in identifying animals. (Use a library or museum.)
3. Same as number 2.
4. Include family members. Talk about what you saw and learned.
5. A feeding station may be as simple as a window sill or a particular place on the ground. To attract birds and animals, use a variety of seeds, nuts, and grains.
6. Choose from different animal games such as Animal Lotto, Animal
Dominoes, and bird and ani­ al games available at Adventist Book m Centers or other Christian book stores.

Updated in: 1996

Grade
- 96 -

1

Friend of Nature
Originated in: North American Division

Requirements

1. Explain:
a. How to become a friend of nature
b. How to pick a flower and when it is allowed
c. How to protect trees, nests, etc.
2. List the names of three different trees and do a bark rubbing of each.
3. Collect four different kinds of leaves and compare them.
4. Do one of the following:
a. Explore (or observe with a magnifying glass) all the things you can see in a ten square- foot area.
b. Explore a yard or park and talk about what you see.
5. Do one of the following:
a. Take a nature walk and collect items of interest.
i.
Show or tell about the items you found. ii. Make them into a collage or poster.
b. Visit one of the following and tell what you saw: iii. Zoo iv. Park
v. Wildlife area
6. Grow one plant or one bulb and make drawings of it at three different stages of its growth.

- 97 -

Supporting Answers

1. Tell how most pollutants are caused by people and their disregard for the creatures God has created. A child is not too young to help by taking proper care of trash and human waste. Teach your group to have an appreciation for the nature God has created and to protect plants, trees, birds, and animals.
2. A naturalist may help you with identification. Place paper on tree bark and lightly rub a crayon over the paper. Compare and talk about the different rubbings and how each tree is unique, just as people are, and very special in its own way.
3. Collect leaves from at least four different trees. You may wish to teach the children how to press, dry, and preserve them. Compare and study the leaves through a magnifying glass.
4. Your search may be for any item of nature found on your walk or just live creatures such as worms, caterpillars, ants, or beetles. Allow the
Adventurers time to describe what they have seen.
5. When you visit a zoo, park, or wildlife area, etc., search for the smaller, often unnoticed creatures including small birds, animals, plants, and flowers. 6. For best results, carefully follow the directions that come with the plant or bulb.

Updated in:

Grade 2
- 98 -

Geologist
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements

1. Tell what a geologist does.
2. Recite a text in the Bible that tells about rocks or minerals. Tell a Bible story about a time when rocks or stones were used.
3. Experiment with soil, sand, gravel, rocks, and water, OR make a crystal garden. 4. With an adult, go on a field trip and collect different types of rocks or minerals. See how many different types, shapes, colors, and textures you can find. Make a collection of five different rocks and label them to tell where you found them.
5. With a group, read Revelation 21.
a. Use an encyclopedia or other reference book to find out about the precious stones listed in the text.
b. Make a colored drawing of the heavenly city.
6. Use stones or rocks to make an art object or painted rock.

- 99 -

Supporting Answers

1. A geologist is a person who studies the formation and origin of the earth’s layers.
2. Help the Adventurers use a concordance to look up the words stones and rocks. Encourage the use of different Bible texts.
3. Place sand, soil, gravel, rocks, and water in a quart jar and gently shake the jar. Let it stand for one hour, then observe it. The layers that develop are the beginning of what is called sedimentary rock.
4. OR
5. Grow a crystal garden: Wet several large chunks of rock thoroughly. Add four tablespoons (1/4 cup) liquid laundry bluing. Hold your nose and add four tablespoons ammonia. Sprinkle four tablespoons of salt evenly all over the rocks. Put a few drops of food coloring and a few drops of bluing on one or two rocks. In about three days, add a mixture of two tablespoons water and two tablespoons ammonia and very carefully pour it into a puddle in the bowl. (If you pour it directly on the crystals you will melt them). Keep adding this water and ammonia mixture every few days.
6. Bring a collection of rocks and minerals to share with your group. Show children how to neatly label and display the ones they find and ways to store them. If you do not know the names of the rocks, use a reference book such as a field guide or encyclopedia as you try to label the rocks.
7. Write the names of the stones so the Adventurers may copy them. Learn a bit about each precious stone. Show a real stone whenever possible or show pictures and use a book about rocks and minerals to help identify them. 8. Paint a face or animal on a rock. Glue rocks on a piece of cardboard to make a simple picture or a design. Glue rocks on a jar or can to make a vase or pencil holder, etc.

Updated in:

Grade 4
- 100 -

Habitat
Originated in: North American Division

Requirements

1. Define habitat and select one to study.
2. Learn about your habitat. Record the day and time you looked at it and what you saw.
3. Name, photograph, or draw a picture of the animals, insects, etc. that you see.
4. Name, photograph, or draw a picture of the plants that you see.
5. Describe your habitat and tell about interesting things that you learned.
6. Find verses in the Bible that tell about your habitat.
7. On which day did God create your habitat?
8. Describe what you think the habitat of Heaven will be like.
9. Create a habitat.

- 101 -

Supporting Answers

1. Habitat: Distinctive and characteristic surroundings such as a pond or deciduous woodland. A habitat is determined chiefly by the vegetation.
It can be a woodland area, a back yard, fruit orchard, or vacant lot. It can be as small as a tree or a rose bush and even be inside your home.
2. This can be done in one outing, but more interesting if the habitat is visited more than once and at different times of day or night.
3. Genesis 1:9-13.
4. Isaiah 65:17-25; Revelation 22:1-5.
5. Suggestions for creating a habitat:
a. Plant flowers that will attract butterflies.
b. Use real or artificial items to create a show box scene of the habitat you studied.
c. Have the class create a mural that combines all the habitats studied.

Updated in: 2003

Grade 4
- 102 -

Honey
Originated in: North American Division

Requirements

1. Where does honey come from?
2. How does the bee make honey?
Understand the terms: super, extractor,nectar, pollen.
3. What is the role of the beekeeper?
4. Make two crafts from the following list:
a. Bee hive
b. Honey comb
c. Bee
d. Flower
e. Your choice
5. Taste three flavors (types) of honey. Discover which you like best. Why?
6. Memorize two of the following Bible verses:
a. Exodus 3:8
b. Psalm 19:7-10
c. Psalm 34:8
d. Proverbs 24:13
e. Proverbs 25:16 & 27
f. Matthew 3:4
g. Your choice

- 103 -

Supporting Answers

1. Explain where nectar is in flowers.
2. Explain the honey making process. The bees put the flower nectar in a sack in their throat. The bee transfers the nectar to a hive cell, fans the honey with its wings to remove moisture, which makes the honey thicker. 3. The beekeeper tends to the bees. The keeper removes the honey filled frames from the super, and then whirls them in an extractor to get the honey out. The honey is then strained and bottled or canned to be sold. Have someone come wearing a bee suit to explain this process, if possible. 4. Craft should be fun and educational.
5. Check your local area market.

Additional enrichment ideas (not required)
1. Have a beekeeper give the presentation.
2. Go visit a place that has an indoor viewable hive with protective plastic sides.
3. Visit a bee store and discover the products available. The storekeeper may have free honey samples.

Updated in: 2008

Grade 3
- 104 -

Honeybee
Originated in: North American Division

Requirements

1. Find several verses in the Bible that speak about bees.
2. Draw the honey bee and tell how it is different from other bees and other insects. Color your picture.
3. Within a colony, name the three types of bees and what their responsibilities include.
4. Explain and draw the life cycle of the honeybee.
5. What is the purpose of the scout bee’s dance?
6. Make two bee crafts.
7. Observe bees, if possible.

- 105 -

Supporting Answers

1. Judges 14:8, Ps 118:12.
2. Provide a picture for the children to observe while they draw the honeybee. Talk about what makes them special.
3. Queen, Drone, worker.
4. This cycle is similar to other insects.
5. The scout bee discovers places for new hives and directs the other bees to it.

Updated in: 2008

Grade 4
- 106 -

Ladybugs
Originated in: North American Division

Requirements
1.
2.
3.
4.

Learn about the ladybug. What are the characteristics of the ladybug?
Describe the lifecycle of the ladybug. Make a poster.
Are all ladybugs red? Explain
Make two ladybug pet rocks. Give one away.

- 107 -

Supporting Answers

1. Ladybugs are a type of beetle. They have six short legs, two antennae, their top flying speed is about 15 miles per hour, they hibernate in winter, they let out a yellowish, bad smelling liquid when they are mad.
(See websites for more info).
2. The female will lay 3-20 football shaped orange eggs in a circular cluster on the underside of leaves. Eggs are not visible to the naked eye.
In 2-5 days the eggs turn into larva and consume up to 400 aphids in 21 days. They next turn into a pupa. After 2-5 days the adults come out and continue to eat. Adult ladybugs eat during the day and will consume over 5000 aphids each.
3. There are more than 450 species in North America. Some are black or vary from reddish-orange to pale yellow. The most common in the U.S. is the Convergent Lady Beetle, which is orange with black spots and the number of spots vary per species. There are five states in the U.S. that have the Ladybug as the state insect.
4. God shared the ladybug with us, and now we can share the ladybug with someone else.
5. The ladybug was created on the 6th day.
Additional Activities:
Release real ladybugs. Color pictures of the ladybug and/or lifecycle. Use pom-poms to make ladybugs.

Updated in: 2005

Grade 2
- 108 -

Lizards
Originated in: North American Division

Requirements
1.
2.
3.
4.

What is a “Herper”? How can you become one?
Learn about lizards in your area.
Learn how to care for a lizard.
Catch a lizard or see them in a pet store, on a video, at a nature center, zoo, or in books. Invite a herpetologist or knowledgeable guest to talk to Adventurers.
5. Paint a lizard on a rock.
6. Read Leviticus 11:29-30.

- 109 -

Supporting Answers

1. Reptiles (lizards, snakes, and turtles) and Amphibians (salamanders, toads, and frogs) are called herps, which means “crawling things.”
If you really like herps and like to watch and learn about them, you are a herper. If you go to college and study herps, you can become a herpetologist and teach, or work in a museum or a zoo.
2. If you do not have lizards in your area, you may study salamanders. If neither is available, go to pet stores, museums, use books, videos, etc.
3. Before you catch a lizard, you must prepare for this special guest.
a. If keeping the lizard for a short time, use a plastic see-through jar with air holes.
b. If you keep the lizard for more than a few hours you must (1) Know what type of lizard it is and how to care for it. (2) Provide a larger container, water, and food. (3) Place newspaper or sand in the bottom of the container to keep it dry.
4. Observe the lizard in its habitat or other locations as mentioned in Helps #2. Try catching a lizard by hand or by using a noose (as described in Peterson Field Guide).
5. Paint a lizard on a rock. See resources: Painting on Rocks for Kids Draw, stencil, or stamp the outline of a lizard on the rock, using pencils or acrylic paint. For details, use paint brush, Q- tips, or toothpicks. If you want to put the rock lizard in your yard, apply clear spray for acrylic paint to preserve the art work.

Updated in: 2005

Grade 3
- 110 -

Outdoor Explorer
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements
1. Take a nature walk and collect:
a. A leaf and tell what tree or plant it comes from
b. A feather and discover what bird it is from
c. A rock and learn what type it is
d. A seed and identify the plant it comes from
2. Learn and recite the following golden rules for hiking:
a. Never cut trees.
b. Never pull up live plants.
c. Do not remove any type of markers.
d. Stay off “No Trespassing” property.
e. Ask permission before walking on private property.
f. Don’t litter.
3. Tell what side of the road to walk on and explain why.
4. Hike one-half mile (1 km) to a picnic area, carry your own lunch, and eat lunch at that area.
5. Take two walks of at least one mile each. One may be with the club and one with your family. Do the following as you walk together:
a. Find nature items for ABC’s such as: A = Acorn; B = Butterfly; C =
Caterpillar, etc.
b. Talk about what you see and tell on what day each was created.
6. Learn and recite the following five safety rules for walking:
a. Always walk with at least one partner.
b. Carry water when going for a walk.
c. Wear comfortable walking shoes.
d. Wear proper clothing.
e. Watch where you walk so you won’t become lost.

- 111 -

Supporting Answers

1. Aim: To develop observation skills; to explore and share.
2. Discuss each rule and be sure the Adventurers understand reasons for it. 3. Contact your area motor vehicle department to determine local laws.
Always walk to the side of the road.
4. Enjoy the walk and picnic together. Be sure the children carry their own food, jackets, etc.
5. As you walk together, discuss what you see and help the Adventurers determine when each was created; for example, trees, birds, fish, butterflies, horse, etc. One walk should be with the club or class and one walk with the child’s family. Have one of the parents write a note to confirm their walk.
6. Children are never too young to learn the safety rules of walking with a partner, carrying water, wearing comfortable shoes and clothing, and watching so as not to become lost.

Updated in:

Grade 4
- 112 -

Trees
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements
1. Read several Bible verses about leaves.
2. Collect leaves from ten different trees.
a. Press and dry them.
b. Identify each leaf.
3. Tell how trees scatter their seeds. Collect or draw at least five different seeds. 4. Make two different leaf rubbings, OR make two pieces of stationery using a leaf design.
5. Discover the trees and leaves in your neighborhood. Learn something special about each one. Be able to recognize and identify five of them.
6. Put your dried leaves in a scrapbook.
7. Write a story or tell about how the trees help us today.

- 113 -

Supporting Answers

1. Some examples are: Genesis 3:7; Genesis 8:11; Ezekiel 47:12;
Revelation 22:2. Encourage the children to look up the texts (they may need help), and read and discuss them together.
2. Encourage variety in shape, color and size, identifying as you collect.
Place leaves between newspaper or paper towel with cardboard top and bottom. Place a weight on top, dry flat, and wait several days until dry before placing in scrapbook. Identify each by writing the name of the tree or shrub next to the leaf.
3. At the right time of the year, help the Adventurers see how the wind blows the seeds from a nearby tree.
4. Place a leaf under white paper and gently rub a color crayon over the paper; the leaf design will appear on the paper. Experiment with different sizes and types of leaves.
5. OR
6. Glue a pressed leaf to the comer of a piece of writing paper. An envelope may have a matching leaf attached. OR place the leaf on an ink pad, press down, then lift it and press it down on the paper or envelope to leave a print.
7. Some plants need shade, others require full sunlight; some need much water, others may be drought resistant. Trees have different types of seeds, leaves, or needles, etc.
8. Help the Adventurers make neat scrapbooks, and identify each leaf they include. Repeat the names of leaves so the children may learn those that are common to your area.

Updated in: 1996

Grade 2
- 114 -

Whale
Originated in: North American Division

Requirements
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Pick one whale to study.
Is a whale a mammal or a fish?
What is the size of the whale when full grown?
Draw full size whale in a parking lot with sidewalk chalk.
Learn five facts about your whale such as those suggested below:
a. What it eats
b. Where it lives or migrates
c. How it interacts with other whales
d. How long it lives
e. How many babies it has and how are they born
f. Listen to whale sounds
6. Sculpt your whale in damp sand or clay.
7. Read or listen to the story of Jonah and act out the story.

- 115 -

Supporting Answers

1. Search the library or websites for information on the whales.
2. Whales, porpoises, and dolphins are the only mammals that live entirely independent of land. Like land mammals, they are warm-blooded vertebrate animals that have hair and breathe air. The baby whale develops in the mother and after birth the mother cares for it and feeds it milk.
3. When a blue whale is born, its coat of blubber is 1 inch (2 1/2 cm.) thick. It gains seven pounds (3 1/4 Kg.) a day and the blubber is one foot (30 1/2 cm.) thick and the whale weighs 30 tons (27,279 Kg.) when full grown. It is the largest living animal and may be as much as 90 feet (27 meters) long and weighing 110 tons ( 100,000 Kg.) or more. Its flippers can be 10 feet (3 meters) long and its flukes 15 feet
(4 1/2 meters) from tip to tip. The heart is the size of a Volkswagen and a human could crawl through the aorta. The tongue is as heavy as an elephant. 4. Place a few marks (dot-to-dot concept) as guides for drawing the actual outline of a whale or draw just a straight line to show the length of the whale. 5. The blue whale is called the moustache whale because it uses the baleen inside its mouth to strain the water out its mouth and to keep plankton and small fish inside. The blue whale swims at 15 miles per hour (30 Kph) and migrates throughout the year to find food. It eats up to two tons (1800 Kg.) of food a day and may live to be 60 years old.
Blue whales give birth once every two years. All whales are very social.
They travel in schools and love to play with each other.

Updated in: 2003

Grade 2
- 116 -

- 117 -

- 118 -

Title

Year

1996

Canoeing

121

NAD

123

EUD

Camper

Page

EUD

Archery

Creator

125

Caring Friend

unknown

GC

127

Collector

unknown

GC

129

Computer Skills

1996

NAD

131

Country Fun

2003

NAD

133

Cyclist

1996

GC

135

First Aid Helper

1996

GC

137

Fitness Fun

1996

GC

139

unknown

GC

141

Gymnast

1996

GC

143

Health Specialist

1996

GC

145

Horsemanship

EUD

147

Knot Tying

EUD

149

1996

NAD

151

Road Safety

unknown

GC

153

Safety Specialist

unknown

GC

155

Skater

unknown

GC

157

Skier

unknown

GC

159

Spotter

unknown

GC

161

Swimmer I

1996

GC

163

Swimmer II

1996

GC

165

Guide

Olympic

- 119 -

- 120 -

Archery
Originated in: Euro-African Division

Requirements
This honor requires an instructor.
1. Explain the rules of safety related to archery.
2. Number the different parts of an arrow.
3. Name the different parts of a bow.
4. Learn how to manipulate the bow, the string, and the arrow.
5. Demonstrate mastery of archery with accurate throwing on a dartboard of 120 cm. in diameter
a. 5 meters (20 arrows)
b. 10 meters (30 arrows)
c. 20 meters (30 arrows)

- 121 -

Supporting Answers

Updated in:

Grade
- 122 -

1

Camper
Originated in: North American Division

Requirements
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

Know and explain camping safety rules.
Camp out at least one night with your club or family.
Help pitch a tent. OR Make a simple shelter from native materials.
Help set up your camp stove or help build a campfire for cooking.
Help prepare at least one meal while camping.
After your camping trip, help put camping supplies away.

- 123 -

Supporting Answers

1. Use common sense in all Adventurer activities. Some rules are included here. Others will be determined by your local situation. Check with the local Forestry or Park Service for specific guidelines for your area.
2. Do not camp too close to streams and bodies of water. Do not harm the environment. Do not cut or destroy trees, bushes, or plants. Never leave a campfire unattended. When you are ready to go home or will be gone from the campsite for a long time, put the campfire out. Never camp or hike alone. Do not run while carrying a sharp object.
3. Camp out at least one night, making this a special time to enjoy nature
(trees, flowers, stars, birds, etc.).
4. Help the Adventurers clear ground, layout ground cloth, set up the tent properly, and learn proper care of all camping items, including tent zippers, tabs, and stakes.
5. Teach safety when handling stoves, fuel, matches, and fire. Teach how to clear the area around a campfire and when and where it is safe to build a campfire.
6. Teach the Adventurers to heat water, boil, fry, or bake food safely.
Demonstrate how to clean up after a meal and how to dispose of food and paper waste.
7. When you arrive home, have the Adventurers help clean and store camping supplies. Have the parents teach the Adventurers to put dirty clothes where they belong.

Updated in: 1996

Grade 2
- 124 -

Canoeing
Originated in: Euro-African Division

Requirements
Note: The adventurer must be accompanied by an instructor at all times.
1. Earn the Swimming I award.
2. Row for a distance of 50 meters; turn right and left, always maintaining the oars on the same side of the canoe.
3. Jump from the canoe into water in such a way that the boat remains dry; return to the canoe, making sure water does not get in the canoe.
4. Know what the prow is and what the stern of the canoe is and learn to maintain stability in a canoe that is being shaken by the water.
5. Know how to prepare for canoeing:
a. Know how to dress appropriately.
b. Know what precautions to take in different climate circumstances.

- 125 -

Supporting Answers

Updated in:

Grade
- 126 -

1

Caring Friend
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements
1. Explain what it means to be a Caring Friend. Find, read, and memorize 1
Peter 5:7.
2. Talk to a person and ask the following:
a. The day and month they were born
b. Their favorite animals
c. Two of their favorite colors
d. Three favorite foods
e. Four things that are important to them
f. Have your new friend tell you some interesting thing that has happened in his or her life.
3. Visit a shut-in or older person and take something to them. Use the questions listed above as you talk together.
4. Tell one of the persons you visit how Jesus loves you and that He loves them also.
5. Demonstrate how you can be a caring person to your parents by:
a. Helping to keep your room clean
b. Helping with food preparation or cleanup after a meal
c. Doing extra chores without being told
6. Tell about something special you have done for a friend.

- 127 -

Supporting Answers

1. Discuss ways Adventurers can be caring friends. For example, be kind to an older person, your playmates, or siblings. Take a cool glass of water or a bouquet of flowers to someone who is ill. Share a book or game.
Make a list as the children describe ways to be a caring friend at home, church, and school. Learn and discuss 1 Peter 5:7.
2. Have the Adventurers write down the birthday (month and day) so they can send or take a card or flowers to surprise their new friend on his or her birthday. The questions are designed to encourage the children to visit with their new friends.
3. Encourage the Adventurers to take something to a shut-in and to visit them using the questions in requirement two as a basis for their conversation. Suggestions: a basket with flowers, a picture the child has drawn and colored, or a craft item the child created.
4. Discuss with the children about their feelings toward God and how they can express His love to others.
5. Encourage the children to do “sweet surprises” or find ways where they can be helpers at home without being asked to do a certain task.
6. Encourage the Adventurers to share their experiences with the group.

Updated in:

Grade 4
- 128 -

Collector
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements
1. Describe what a collector does.
2. Name five popular things that people collect.
3. Make two different personal collections with at least 20 items in each.
a. Objects such as stamps, postcards, coins, etc.
b. Nature objects such leaves, rocks, feathers, shells, etc.
OR
c. Make one personal collection of objects; and
d. As a group or class, collect nature items.
4. Have a collector’s show and display your personal collections neatly arranged with all objects well identified.
5. Show and explain something you have learned about in one of your collections. - 129 -

Supporting Answers

1. A collector is a person who gathers and learns about things in which he or she is interested.
2. Some examples are stamps, stickers, buttons, coins, dolls, model cars, baseball cards, rocks, shells, feathers, etc.
3. Make sure that it is permissible to collect in the area you go to. Plan what you want to collect. You may wish to collect items such as rocks, leaves, or seeds. Collect one item for each letter of the alphabet, as in A is for apple, B is for bug, C is for crabgrass, etc. (You may need to include non-nature items.) Or you may prefer to have a preplanned treasure hunt with written clues for the children to follow with a “treasure” at the end of the hunt (could be a toy, a game, food, etc.).
4. This may be a club, school, or Sabbath school activity.
5. Let the children choose items that they may have started collecting already or something available in your area, such as a collection of buttons, stickers, cat pictures, miniature figures, nature items, etc.
6. Encourage the children to talk about their collections after they have been neatly displayed, telling their reason for making this particular collection and discussing new things they have learned about items in their collection.

Updated in:

Grade 2
- 130 -

Computer Skills
Originated in: North American Division

Requirements
1. Explain the purpose of each item:
a. Computer system
b. Monitor
c. Mouse
d. Keyboard
e. Central Processing Unit
f. Hard disk
g. Scanner
h. CD ROM
i. Modem
j. Printer
k. Network
l. Diskette
2. What are computers good for?
a. Documents and books
b. Databases
c. Calculations
d. Communications
e. Research
f. Fun
3. Do one of the following:
a. Type and print a thank-you note.
b. Play an educational game.
4. Do one of the following:
a. Visit an office and see how a computer helps that person with their work. b. Visit a computer sales person and have them give a demonstration of the latest technology.
5. Know the home row of the keyboard.
a. Show the proper hand position on the keyboard.
b. Explain why proper hand position is important.
c. Type on an elementary typing program such as Sticky Bear or
Mavis Beacon.
- 131 -

Supporting Answers

1. Find a current computer book or dictionary with the definitions. Use correct terminology, but find illustrations to help children understand the concepts.
2.
a. Documents and books—Word processors are primarily designed to create letters, reports, and documents. Desktop publishing programs help combine graphics with text.
b. Databases—Programs that allow you to manipulate, store, record, and retrieve information from a collection of related files: like addresses, memberships, or store inventories.
c. Calculations—Spreadsheets are made for math calculations for accounting or record- keeping purposes.
d. Communications—Cover the Internet, E-mail, and the worldwide web. Talk about the need to use discipline to bypass the bad information and how to use the good information.
e. Research—Current resource materials for research are available in minutes through the Internet services. You can also use material from CD-ROMs or other resource software. Computerized searches are fast, and sometimes give you more ideas. One such CD is the E.
G. White Library or an encyclopedia CD.
f. Games—There will always be games. Computer games can be good if they challenge your mind and mental skills as well as your dexterity. Put it to the test of Philippians 4:8. All of our computer work should meet that standard.

Updated in: 1996

Grade 4
- 132 -

Country Fun
Originated in: North American Division

Requirements

1. Pick a country you want to study.
2. On a world map, find the location of the country and identify what continent it is on.
3. Find, draw, or trace a map and flag of your country.
4. Learn six facts about the country, such as those suggested below:
a. Draw or find a picture of the native dress.
b. Learn a Sabbath or secular song.
c. Listen to the national anthem.
d. Learn to play a Sabbath or secular game.
e. Name the main religion.
f. Collect a stamp, postcard, or coin.
g. Read or listen to a legend, myth, or story.
5. Make a simple craft or food from the country.
6. Read in the Bible how languages originated at the tower of Babel
(Genesis 11:1-9).

- 133 -

Supporting Answers

1. Use local church members, library, or website for information.
2. Recommended book and website are listed below. You may wish to make a country scrapbook.

Updated in: 2003

Grade 2
- 134 -

Cyclist
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements

1. Earn the Road Safety Award.
2. Demonstrate:
a. How to keep the bike clean
b. How to safely ride the bike
c. Use turn signals while riding
d. How to take care of the bike
3. Participate in a bike activity.
4. Do a five-mile bike ride.
5. Make a map of where you went.
6. With your family, use your map to retrace your route.

- 135 -

Supporting Answers

1. Helps for number 2:
a. Clean and polish the bikes, then decorate them and have an inspection. b. Set up a barrel race to practice.
c. During the above race, use hand singles.
d. Have small groups act out good and bad ways of caring for a bike.
Have them wear plastic garbage bags and oil the chain.
2. Helps for number 3:
Hold a Bicycle Derby Day:
a. Bike inspection by the police or fireman
b. Have a “pit” area for preparing bikes for inspection.
c. Plan a parade for decorated bikes. Give a prize.
d. Play games using the bike: Fast race, slow race, relay race, paper boy throw, obstacle race, etc.
3. Plan a five-mile bike hike. Decorate your bike, then go to a park with paved trails. After the ride, have a picnic or go swimming. Have a special reward for those who successfully complete the hike.
4. Map-making is fun. Keep it simple. Use pencils and rulers.

Updated in: 1996

Grade 3
- 136 -

First Aid Helper
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements

1. Demonstrate how to treat an abrasion or a cut and describe the dangers of a dirty dressing.
2. Describe how to care for a nosebleed.
3. Identify and make a display of different types of bandages.
4. Make a simple first aid kit and learn uses of included items.
5. Sterilize one of the following and tell why each is an important item to have in your first aid kit.
a. tweezers
b. thermometer
c. needle
6. Visit an emergency-care facility to learn about some of the emergencies they care for.
7. Play “hospital” and practice your skills on the above emergencies.
8. Describe and draw the first aid symbol.
9. Name a time when Jesus gave first aid to someone who was bleeding badly. - 137 -

Supporting Answers

1. A dirty dressing can cause infection. Clean a cut or abrasion with running water and cover with a clean bandage.
2. Sit down, lean forward, and apply pressure on the side that is bleeding.
Apply a cold compress to nose and face.
3. Triangular bandage, adhesive-strip dressing, figure of eight, fingertip, spiral, and circular bandages are good ones to teach children how to make. Practice applying these bandages.
4. Even a simple kit needs the following items: Adhesive compress bandage compress, 2” by 2” plain gauze pads, gauze roller bandage, triangular bandages, needle, scissors, tweezers, thermometer, disinfectant, calamine lotion, insect repellant, and an ace bandage.
5. Wash with soap and water, then sterilize with alcohol. Needle could be used to remove a sliver, tweezers for stickers or glass. Teach children to read a thermometer and explain when one is used and why.
6. Plan to visit a hospital or fire station or have a community worker come to talk with your group about the different emergencies he/she handles as part of the job.
7. Bring clean sheets and bandages and let the children “treat” the different problems with simple care.
8. The award design is the recognized first aid symbol.
9. See Matthew 26:51.

Updated in: 1996

Grade 3
- 138 -

Fitness Fun
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements

1. List at least four things that contribute to physical fitness.
2. Run or jog 800 meters (approximately one-half mile), OR Run fifty meters in ten seconds.
3. Make a high jump. (Record highest of four jumps.)
4. Jump or skip rope for three minutes.
5. Do three different stretches. Hold each for a minimum of ten seconds.
a. Leg
b. Back
c. Arms/shoulders
6. Participate in an obstacle course.
7. Demonstrate your ability to do the following:
a. Ten sit-ups
b. Climb a pole, rope, or tree
c. Hang from a bar with hands and knees
8. With your group, participate in an organized game that requires physical fitness, for example, ball game, relay race, leapfrog, etc.

- 139 -

Supporting Answers

NOTE: This award is one of the requirements for the Sunbeam Class.

1. Fitness includes proper nutrition, rest, water, exercise, strength, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, endurance—keeping your body in the best possible condition.
2. Jog or run as a group, always with adult supervision.
3. Jump onto a mat or other soft material such as sand or sawdust. Be certain the “bar” the children jump over is set lightly on pegs and is not a solid piece that could cause injury.
4. Play several jump rope games, allowing for practice, as many may never have used a jump rope.
5. When stretching, use static stretches (hold stretch for 15 seconds without bouncing). To avoid injury, do stretches both before and after exercise. 6. Set up an obstacle course that the Adventurers can run around, under, over, and through. Use objects such as tires, cardboard boxes, pylons, ropes, and poles.
7. An adult must supervise these activities.
8. Play these games as a group or family if possible. Be sure an adult supervises. Updated in: 1996

Grade 2
- 140 -

Guide
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements

1. Describe the work of a Guide.
2. Tell the locations of four of the following and be able to give directions from your home to reach them:
a. post office
b. pharmacy
c. phone booth
d. police station
e. church
f. fire station
g. grocery store
h. school
3. Tell how to ask for directions and whom you should ask.
4. Organize a trip for a few friends to visit one of the following in your area: a. museum
b. monument
c. interesting sight
d. fire station
e. police station
f. hospital
g. factory
5. Draw a simple map of your neighborhood, including your house, or give a friend directions to your house.
6. You have been a guide to different places, but who does the Bible say is our true Guide? (See Psalm 48:14.)

- 141 -

Supporting Answers

1. A guide is someone who helps you find your way.
2. Do not expect the Adventurers to use direction words such as north, south, east, and west. They should give street names and number of blocks, if available.
3. To receive good directions, the Adventurer must ask good questions.
Children should get directions from people known to them, police officers, teachers, or other officials.
4. Help the Adventurers plan transportation, invitations, things to see and do, etc. When the trip is over, lead a discussion about what was done and seen.
5. Some children will need assistance with this project.
6. Read the text together and discuss its meaning.

Updated in:

Grade
- 142 -

1

Gymnast
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements

1. Have the Fitness Fun Award.
2. Perform at least five different warm-ups. Be able to lead warm-ups and stretches at the start of a class.
3. Practice making a high jump. Record the best of four.
4. Practice making a long jump. Record the best of four.
5. Run 50 meters in ten seconds.
6. Do the following:
a. Backward roll
b. Cartwheel
c. Back bend
d. Backward straddle roll
e. Dive roll
f. Head stand
g. Forward straddle roll
h. Beam walk
i. Handstand

- 143 -

Supporting Answers

1. Adventurers must have completed the requirements for the Fitness Fun
Award before they begin this award. All gymnastic activities must be closely supervised by an adult.
2. Ideal warm-ups for children include skipping, hopping, jumping jacks, animal walks (elephant, crab, kangaroo, frog, bunny), jogging in place, jumping rope, etc. Have each child lead a warm-up session. Stretch legs, back, wrists, hands, ankles (rotate in circles), head (lean from side to side and hold).
3. Record the best of four.
4. Record the best of four.
5. Use a stopwatch or a watch with a second hand to measure the time.
6. Positions: stretch/layout, pike, tuck. Regarding the movements:
a. For safety, make sure your hands are placed on the floor by your shoulders when you perform a backward roll.
b. Keep arms and legs straight, fingers toward each other.
c. Stand and slowly lean backward, lowering hands to the floor. Back bridge: Push up from the floor. Backbend: From a standing position, slowly arch back until hands touch the floor.
d. From a standing straddle position, lean back placing hands between legs, as you roll hands go to shoulders, as in a back roll, and end in straddle stretch.
e. Practice dive rolls, staying tightly tucked for safety.
f. From a three-point frog stand, slowly raise legs to a straight position. g. From a standing straddle, position place hands between legs with fingers facing forward, tuck head and roll. Hands push off the floor and end with a standing stretch.
h. Walk on a balance beam, touching foot to knee each time you step.
i. Execute a handstand, kicking up and down by yourself. Practice with a spotter until you can do handstands alone.
Keep in mind that some youngsters will find gymnastics easier than others.
Make it fun and praise their efforts. Have an adult “spotter” nearby to avoid injuries. Updated in: 1996

Grade 3
- 144 -

Health Specialist
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements

1. Memorize and repeat 1 Corinthians 6:19, 20.
2. Cut out pictures and make a poster to show the four basic food groups.
Arrange the pictures to show three healthy meals you could eat.
3. Explain why your body needs exercise.
4. For one week, record the hours you sleep. Tell why you need rest.
5. Explain why you need fresh air and sunlight.
6. Explain why water is important for your body. Tell the number of glasses of water you should drink each day.
7. Describe and practice good dental hygiene.
8. Name three things that might destroy your health.

- 145 -

Supporting Answers

NOTE: This award is a requirement for the Busy Bee Class.

1. Talk together as a group or family about the principles of the text.
2. Have a tasting party that includes foods from each of the four food groups. Blindfold the Adventurers and have them guess what food they smell, then taste the food. OR Have the Adventurers cut pictures of food from old magazines, arrange them on a poster or paper plates and discuss what makes a balanced meal.
3. Your body needs exercise to keep muscles strong, strengthen your heart, improve your lung capacity, make you look and feel better. Do several exercises for fun and health. “Tortoise and Hare” is a runningin-place exercise. First you “run” 50 steps slowly as a tortoise, then
50 steps faster as the hare would run. Repeat three times. Have a wheelbarrow race in which one child holds the ankles of the first child.
They both walk forward, one on hands, the other on feet. Then they change places.
4. When you sleep your whole body relaxes, including your muscles, heart, and breathing. Your body uses this time to recover and repair itself.
5. Without fresh air, we cannot live. Breathe deeply and enjoy. Sunlight contains vitamin D, which helps to form strong bones. Sunlight is a disinfectant. Exercise in the sunlight by doing the “Russian Hop.” Get into a squat position with your arms folded across your chest. Hop up and forward with your feet. Hop around in a circle. At the end of each hop, you are back in the starting position.
6. We lose water when we breathe, sweat, or urinate, and it must be replaced. Your body is about two thirds or 65 percent water. Drink two and one-half quarts of water daily to remain healthy. Many foods have water; lettuce is nine-tenths water.
7. A dentist has educational materials that explain dental hygiene to children. 8. Contact your family doctor, local health department, or public library for a video or film that will make this a real learning experience. Many things could destroy your health: lack of sleep, poor eating habits, little or no exercise, drinking alcohol, drug abuse, etc.

Updated in: 1996

Grade
- 146 -

1

Horsemanship
Originated in: Euro-African Division

Requirements

1. Name at least five parts of a horse from a drawing.
2. Name and describe the different horse breeds and the different uses of each. 3. Explain and demonstrate the correct form to mount a horse.
4. Explain and demonstrate the correct form to trot.
5. Explain the correct form to gallop.
6. Explain how to manage a horse in the following circumstances:
a. If the horse is scared
b. If the horse refuses to obey
c. If it bolts
7. Explain in detail how to control a horse by the reins. This is one of the key points of horsemanship.
8. Explain four preventive rules to follow, in order of execution, to avoid the horse becoming overheated after prolonged exercise.

- 147 -

Supporting Answers

Updated in:

Grade 2
- 148 -

Knot Tying
Originated in: Euro-African Division

Requirements

1. Know and explain the different types of lashing that exist.
2. Learn to make the following knots and explain their usage:
a. Double Loop
b. Sliding
c. Fisherman
d. Loop
e. Lark Clip
f. Flat
g. Sheet Bend
h. Bowline
i. Pearl
j. Surgeon
k. Clove Hitch
l. Eight
3. Prepare a model over a table or cardboard that includes twelve knots you have learned to make.

- 149 -

Supporting Answers

Updated in:

Grade
- 150 -

1

Olympic
Originated in: North American Division

Requirements

1. Learn a little about the Olympic Games:
a. Where were they first held?
b. When?
c. Where will the next Games be held?
2. Make an Olympic banner.
3. Make an Olympic torch.
4. Play an Olympic game.
5. Make an Olympic color chain.
6. Memorize II Timothy 4:7.
7. Who in the New Testament talks about running a race?
8. Discuss with your parent or teacher what I Corinthians 9:24-26 means.

- 151 -

Supporting Answers

1. Use an encyclopedia to answer (a) and (b).
2. This banner can be an 8.5” x 11” or everyone can work on one together as a club.
3. Each person makes a torch. It can be made out of a Styrofoam cone, paper maché, etc.
4. Games like a baton race, javelin throw (Nerf javelin), sock throw, standing broad jump, etc.
5. The chain can be made out of chenille. Use the Olympic colors (black, yellow, green, and blue). Twist each chenille strip in a circle, attach the circle to another strip of chenille, twist and continue until all colors are used. Can be worn on the Adventurer’s head.
7. Paul.

Updated in: 1996

Grade 3
- 152 -

Road Safety
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements

1. Identify and explain ten important road signs.
2. Tell when and where to cross the road safely.
3. Give road safety rules for:
a. Walking safely along the road
b. Riding your bicycle on the road
c. Riding a horse
d. Walking with a group
4. Explain why you should wear a seat belt when riding in a car.
5. Listen to a highway patrol officer or other safety person talk about safety for children.
6. Play a safety game.

- 153 -

Supporting Answers

1. Some examples:
a. Stop
b. Yield
c. Wrong Way
d. Walk
e. No Left Turn
f. Don’t Walk
g. No U Turn
h. One Way
i. School Crossing
j. Sharp Turn
k. Speed Limit
l. Railroad Crossing
m. Pedestrian Crossing
2. Cross the road only at an intersection or crosswalk. If there is a traffic light, cross only when it is green for your direction.
3. Walk to the side of the road facing the traffic. The rules may vary in your area. Check with the department of motor vehicles, road or highway authority, or police department for regulations for walking, riding a horse or bicycle, and walking in a group. Help the Adventurers understand the need to abide by traffic rules.
4. Watch a movie or listen to a police officer explain about seat belt safety.
We wear safety belts so we will experience less injury in an accident. It is the law in many parts of the world.
5. Have a safety expert talk with the children at their age level, stressing what children can do to be safe.
6. Make poster board signs and play “Simon Says,” holding signs up. Have the children do what the sign says, either on foot or on a bicycle. Plan other games. Games are a good way to teach road safety.

Updated in:

Grade 2
- 154 -

Safety Specialist
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements

1. With your parents, discuss your home fire safety plan. Select two of the following areas and give four safety rules for each area:
a. Home safety
b. Outdoor safety (city or country)
c. Weather safety
d. People safety
2. Practice a fire drill for at least one of the following places:
a. Home
b. School
c. Church (if possible)
3. As appropriate for your area, practice the following safety drills OR
Discuss what you would do in the following emergencies:
a. Hurricane
b. Tornado
c. Earthquake
d. Flood
e. Volcano
f. Lightning and thunder
4. Be a safety detective. Check the people and places that you are learning about and list any hazards.
5. Make a mural or safety poster showing dangerous situations and what you can do about them.
6. With your club, play the Safety Game. Give each other safety situations to answer with “Yes,” “No,” or “I’ll ask my mom.”

- 155 -

Supporting Answers

1. Encourage parents to help the Adventurers make a fire-safety plan.
People safety refers to refusing rides with strangers, etc.
2. Draw a floor plan for your school, club, and/or church, and show where and how to go out of the area in case of emergency. Practice these drills.
3. Local police or fire departments or your local library will have information for your particular area. Discuss the kind of disasters that may appear so you can inform and prepare the children without frightening them.
4. Make up a “Safety Detective” button or ribbon that the Adventurers may wear the week they are recording potential problems at home or school. They should look for hazards such as a broken latch on a cabinet that has cleaning fluids or medicine in it, frayed wires or broken electrical plugs, a rake lying face up, boards on the sidewalk, a broken water faucet, unlabeled containers holding paint thinner or gasoline, broken glass, etc.
5. Ask permission to display the posters in a public place.
6. Give the children safety situations in which they must answer, “Yes,”
“No,” or “I’ll ask Mom and Dad.” Start the game with a situation you have experienced, such as broken glass on the floor. Ask, “Would you pick up the glass?” “Would you tell your mother?” Encourage the children to share realistic situations and to think carefully before acting.

Updated in:

Grade
- 156 -

1

Skater
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements

1. Describe where and when it is safe to skate.
2. Demonstrate care of a pair of skates.
3. Demonstrate the ability to skate forward, backward, to the right, to the left, and know how to change direction.
4. Skate through a curve, coast, and then come to a full stop.
5. Skate a slalom course with at least six obstacles.
6. Describe or participate in one game played on skates.
7. Tell what protective gear should be worn when skating.

- 157 -

Supporting Answers

NOTE: Adventurers may receive a Skater Award for Ice or Roller Skating.

1. If ice skating, be certain an adult has told you the ice is safe. Never skate alone. Roller skating can be done at a gym, a rink, or on a sidewalk, depending on the type of skates you have.
2. Dry and clean ice skates after each use. Wipe roller skates clean and check for loose wheels. Replace skate laces whenever needed.
Depending on type of roller skates, wheel bearings may need to be oiled. 3. Practice skating so that the young people get a good feel for skating.
Stress safety and caution to prevent injuries.
4. Encourage the Adventurers to skate carefully and watch for other skaters at all times.
5. Use soft obstacles for your slalom course so if a child falls he or she will not be injured.
6. Select a game that is suitable for the Adventurer age group.
7. Knee pads, elbow pads, and protective helmets are examples of protective gear. When ice skating outdoors, warm clothing is also protective gear.

Updated in:

Grade 4
- 158 -

Ski er
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements

1. Describe how to care for skis and boots.
2. Demonstrate the following:
a. How to carry your skis
b. How to put them on
c. How to fasten them
3. Demonstrate how to climb in steps, in scissors, and how to make a kick turn. 4. Demonstrate how to sideslip and go over bumps.
5. Demonstrate how to turn right, left, and brake.
6. Describe the different kinds of snow.
7. Demonstrate the following:
a. How to run a short slalom of six gates
OR
b. Safely ride a beginner’s lift and ski the beginner’s hill under control and in good form.

- 159 -

Supporting Answers

NOTE: Activities leading to this award must be supervised by an adult who skis well.
1. Skis and boots should be wiped clean and be dry before storing them.
2-7. If you do not ski, invite someone who does to teach these basic skills to your Adventurers.

Updated in:

Grade 2
- 160 -

Spotter
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements

1. Spot and identify the following:
a. Four different animals
b. Four different types of motor vehicles
c. Two different types of airplanes or boats
d. Four different nature objects such as trees, flowers, etc.
e. Four different birds
2. Observe and describe three people in uniform. Tell what they do and why they do it.
3. Find, read, and discuss what the text Matthew 28:20 tells us.
4. Observe your church. Write or draw a picture that tells what you can do to help keep it clean.
5. Look at your room and draw a picture of it. If you have a scrapbook, put your picture in it. Clean your room. Draw a second picture and tell how your room looks different.
6. Remember ten out of fifteen items after looking at them for two minutes. - 161 -

Supporting Answers

NOTE: The goal of this award is to help the Adventurers become more aware of people and things around them and to consider how they can help change things for the better if they observe problems.
1. If possible, have the Adventurers do these observations outdoors. If not practical, have the Adventurers draw pictures of items they find, or cut pictures from old magazines. These may be placed in the Adventurer’s scrapbook if you have done the Reporter Award.
2. If possible, have the Adventurers observe the people in person. If not practical, have the Adventurers draw, photograph, or cut from old magazines pictures of uniformed workers and place them in the reporter scrapbook or begin a new scrapbook. Some examples are:
a. Policeman
b. Fireman
c. Nurse
d. Postman
e. Ambulance worker
f. Traffic officer
3. Find, read together, discuss, and explain Matthew 28:20.
4. Help your Adventurers learn to spot potential problems and what they may do to help, for example, pick up trash, straighten song books, etc.
5. Explain that the Adventurers may be good spotters, but unless they do their part to clean their area they have not earned the Spotter Award.
6. Place familiar items on a table and have the Adventurer study them.
After two minutes, cover the items and have the child tell you or make a list of the items they remember. Play this game several times to teach the children to be more observant.

Updated in:

Grade
- 162 -

1

Swimmer I
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Learn and recite seven safety rules for swimmers.
Hold your breath and duck your head under water for five seconds.
Demonstrate how to jump properly in water that is not over your head.
With your friends, play a water game in shallow water.
Hold on to the edge of the pool and demonstrate how to kick your feet properly. Demonstrate your ability to:
a. Float on your back
b. Swim underwater
6. Know where and when it is possible to swim without danger.

- 163 -

Supporting Answers

NOTE: The goal is to introduce the children to swimming and to help them get over any fear they may have.

1. Rules:
a. Do not swim without an adult present.
b. Do not run near water.
c. Do not dunk another person.
d. Do not push or shove another person.
e. Do not play in water over your head until you can swim well.
f. Do not depend on flotation devices; learn to swim.
g. Do not jump into water without knowing it is safe.
2. Along with the Adventurers, make a game of holding your breath and ducking your head under water. You may want to have them practice holding their breath out of the water first.
3. Teach the Adventurers to jump safely into water after the area is clear of rocks, other swimmers, etc.
4. Play a water game in which the Adventurers will get some water splashed on them without scaring them.
5. Show the children how to hold on to the edge of the pool or a paddle board while developing a proper and strong kick.
6. Demonstrate these to non-swimmers. Supervise their attempts. Never leave a non-swimmer to try these alone. Show the children how to push off, hold their breath, and kick under water.
7. Teach the Adventurers safety rules for where and when it is safe to swim. For example, never swim without an adult present; do not swim when it is stormy; never jump or dive into water without checking out the area first; swim only in clean pools, lakes, and rivers where it is safe and where you have permission to swim, etc.

Updated in: 1996

Grade
- 164 -

1

Swimmer II
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements

1. Complete and receive the Swimmer I Award.
2. Review and discuss safety rules to be observed when swimming or playing in the water.
3. Float on your back for 30 seconds.
4. Float on your stomach for 30 seconds.
5. Jump in water over your head and pick up two stones.
6. Swim 10 yards (10 m) freestyle.
7. Swim on your back for 10 yards (10 m).
8. Swim a few yards using your feet only, then using your hands only.
9. Tell three things you could do to help save someone from drowning.

- 165 -

Supporting Answers

1. Encourage the Adventurers to complete both swimmer awards so they will be ready to go on to beginner’s swimming when they join the
Pathfinder Club.
2. Impress on the Adventurers that safety is very important. Be sure they observe these rules:
a. No running, pushing, or shoving.
b. No jumping into water without knowing it is safe and free from rocks and sticks, etc.
c. Do not swim during a storm.
d. Do not swim unless an adult is present.
e. Do not depend on a flotation device for safety.
3. Work with the Adventurers individually so each may float without fear.
4. Have the Adventurers practice holding their breath while floating face down, then come up for air and put their faces back into the water to continue floating.
5. Place two stones without sharp edges in water just over the
Adventurers’ heads. Have each child jump in and pick them up.
6. Teach proper kicking and arm and hand strokes.
7. Teach proper kicking and arm and hand strokes.
8. Teach proper kicking and arm and hand strokes.
9. Three things a child could do to help a person who is drowning include: run to a nearby adult for help; hold a long stick out for the person to hold on to; throw a rope out to the person and pull him or her to shallow water.

Updated in: 1996

Grade 3
- 166 -

- 167 -

- 168 -

Year

Bible I

1996

Bible Royalty

GC

Page

1999

Bible II

Creator

1996

Title

GC

NAD

173
179

2008

NAD

2008

Disciples

NAD

2005

Early Adventist Pioneer
Friend of Jesus

unknown

Fruits of the Spirit
My Church

2007

Pearly Gate

1999

Prayer

2006

Prayer Warrior

2005

Rainbow Promise

1999

Steps to Jesus

2004

Temperance

1996

Wise Steward

1996

- 169 -

NAD
GC

NAD
NAD
NAD
NAD
NAD
NAD
GC
GC

171
175
177
181
183
185
187
189
191
193
195
197
199

- 170 -

Bib le I
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements
1.
2.
3.
4.

Own or have use of a Bible.
Explain how to show respect for the Bible and how to care for it.
Name the first and last books of the Bible and tell who wrote them.
Tell or act out the following stories:
a. Creation
b. Sin and sadness begin
c. Jesus cares for me today
d. Jesus comes again
e. Heaven
5. Locate, read, and discuss the following Bible verses about Jesus’ love for you. Memorize and repeat two of them.
a. John 3:16
b. Psalm 91:11
c. John 14:3
d. Psalm 23:1
e. Your Choice
6. Prepare and act out a Bible story or parable of your choice OR, with a group, recreate a Bible story in some sand.

NOTE: The Bible I Award is a requirement of the Busy Bee class work. It may be taught in the Adventurer Club or, by arrangement and cooperation, in the church school or Sabbath School class.

- 171 -

Supporting Answers

1. If possible, see that each child has his or her own Bible. Teach that nothing is ever placed on a Bible and that the Bible is to be kept clean.
Show how to be careful and how to handle the Bible reverently.
2. Same as 1.
3. Help the Adventurers locate Genesis and Revelation in their Bibles.
Encourage them to locate each while a child tells about the author. Play
Bible games, use felts, etc. Make this a happy learning experience.
4. Help the children pantomime or dramatize the stories. Encourage them to make the story “come alive.” Keep a box of props, including items such as bath robes, scarves, and a cane to help the children illustrate the
Bible characters.
5. Practice finding the texts in the Bible. Read them together and explain each text so the children can understand its meaning.
6. Illustrate or act out Bible stories such as Daniel in the Lion’s Den,
Creation, Garden of Eden, etc., or other Bible story of the Adventurer’s choice. Updated in: 1996

Grade
- 172 -

1

Bib le II
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements

1. Earn the Bible I Award.
2. Tell the names of the two major parts of the Bible. Tell the names of the books known as the gospels.
3. Recite all the books of the New Testament in order.
4. Tell or act out the following Bible stories:
a. David and Jonathan
b. Abraham and Isaac
c. Noah and the Flood
d. Samuel called by the Lord
5. Read or listen to a tape of the first nine chapters of Genesis.
6. Find, memorize, and explain three of the following Bible verses about giving your life to Jesus:
a. Acts 16:31
b. John 1:12
c. Galatians 3:26
d. 2 Cor. 5:7
e. Psalm 51:10
7. Play active or paper games to enjoy and remember the Bible stories.

- 173 -

Supporting Answers

1. The Bible II Award is a requirement of the Builder class. It may be taught in the Adventurer Club or as part of the church school or Sabbath
School Bible class.
2. The two major parts of the Bible are the Old Testament and the New
Testament. The books known as the gospels are Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John.
3. Use songs, games, felts, etc. to teach these.
4. Encourage creativity. Lead the Adventurers to understand the lesson each story teaches.
5. Make sure your children have hands-on experience using their Bibles, but also use Bible story books, videos, and cassette tapes to teach these stories in an interesting way.
6. Help the children understand the meaning of each passage and how it can apply to their lives.
7. Bible game books, Bible color books, and felt sets are available at
Christian book stores.

Updated in: 1996

Grade 4
- 174 -

Bib le Royalty
Originated in: North American Division

Requirements
1.
2.
3.
4.

Memorize Psalm 100:4.
Name five Bible kings. Which kings were the best rulers and why?
Tell the stories about two of the kings as the children act out the stories.
Name at least four queens in the Bible. Why are these queens important? 5. Write a story about queens and read it to the class.
6. Make two of the following:
a. A throne room using a shoe box
b. Make crowns and explain what decorations meant to the king
c. Decorate a chair for a king
d. Make a mural of a throne room
e. Other

- 175 -

Supporting Answers

1. “Enter his gates with thanksgiving and his courts with praise; give thanks to him and praise his name. For the LORD is good and his love endures forever; his faithfulness continues through all generations.”
2. First king – Saul; second king – David; third king – Solomon. Joash was seven years old when he started his reign; Josiah was eight when he became king, King Jesus, etc. These are just a few examples, list more if possible. 3. Use costumes, crowns, throne chair, etc. if possible.
4. Vashti, Esther, Bathsheba, Queen of Sheba, Jezebel, etc.
5. May work in small groups to write the story, then share the story with the class.
6. Use Bible story books for picture ideas. Possibilities include throne, carpet, pictures, vases, jewels, velvet, etc.

Updated in: 2008

Grade 4
- 176 -

Disciples
Originated in: North American Division

Requirements

1. What is a disciple?
2. Using the Bible, find the names and occupation of the disciples and put each name and occupation on a separate card. (Matthew 10:2-4, Mark
3:14-19, Luke 6:13-16, John 1:41-48). Mix up the cards on the floor and see how many names you can match with an occupation.
3. Name two sets of disciples that were brothers. (See Matthew 10:2.)
4. Discover which disciple was called first to follow Jesus. Read to find what that disciple did when he discovered Jesus was the Messiah (John
1:35-42).
5. What did the disciples ask Jesus to teach them to do? (See Luke 11:1.)
6. Repeat the Lord’s Prayer.
7. Choose a disciple and learn three things about him.
8. Sing a song about the disciples and/or do a short skit.
9. Be a disciple for Jesus.

- 177 -

Supporting Answers
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

One who is a student or follower of a teacher’s doctrines or school of thought. Andrew, Simon (Peter), James, John, Philip, Nathaniel (Bartholomew),
Matthew (Levi), Thomas, James, Simon, Judas, and Judas Iscariot. We do not know the occupations of all the disciples. What do you think they did? Peter and Andrew; James and John, the sons of Zebedee or the “Sons of
Thunder.”
Andrew was called first to follow Jesus. He ran to get his brother so he could become a disciple of Jesus also.
The disciples asked Jesus to teach them to pray.
Luke 11:2-4.
See resources.
“There Were 12 Disciples” song in “Sing for Joy” page 53. “Peter James and John in a Sailboat”, CD by Cedarmont Kids. Track eight on “Little
David Presents Bible Songs” CD by Christian Songs for Kids.
Perform an act of kindness, such as preparing packages for the homeless. Updated in: 2005

Grade 3
- 178 -

Early Adventist Pioneer
Originated in: North American Division

Requirements

This award is designed to create in children a growing awareness of their
Adventist heritage, helping them feel good about being Adventist and encouraging them to value the contribution of the pioneers.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

Name five Adventist Pioneers and tell something about each.
Read a story about an Adventist Pioneer.
Learn an early Adventist hymn. Memorize the first verse.
Make and taste a batch of granola; tell what granola had to do with the pioneers. Paint, tie-die, or decorate a plain bandana. Use the bandana to dress-up as a pioneer.
Memorize Rev. 14:12.
Hold a large book like Ellen White did in her vision and time yourself.
Play an early American game.
Do an early American craft.

- 179 -

Supporting Answers

1. Ellen White, James White, William Miller, Joseph Bates, J.N. Andrews,
Hiram Edson, etc. RESOURCES: William Miller Heritage Farm (8” x 10” color pictures and bios available from the ABC); “Life of the Pioneers” tape series from Michigan Conference.
2. Books for requirement #2 include: Ellen, by Mable Miller; Camp
Meeting Angel, by Paul Ricchiuti.
3. Songs from SDA Hymnal: “Tis Love That Makes Us Happy,” No. 579;
“You Will See Your Lord A Comin’,” No. 438; “I Saw One Weary,” No. 441;
“What Heavenly Music,” No. 452; “Don’t You See My Jesus Coming?” No.
454.
4. Talk about the importance of breakfast and breakfast foods. Mention some history of breakfast (Councils on Diets & Food and Adventist
Home). Check any cookbook for a granola recipe such as Century 21 375 Meatless Meats. If it is impossible to make granola, purchase the granola bars and talk about the ingredients that make granola healthy for us. (Whole grains that are precooked and quick to prepare.) Make granola at the meeting and send some home with each family along with the recipe.
5. Make bandanas by cutting a 24” square of plain cotton cloth in half diagonally (from corner to corner); stamp or stencil pictures on it in the shape of animals, wagons, or children. For dress-up, provide long dresses, bib overalls, cowboy hats, etc.
6. Weigh the book. Is your book smaller or larger than Ellen’s? (The Early
Years 1827-1862).
7. Jump rope, tug of war, falling off the stars, hop scotch, tag games, button-button, drop the hanky, milk the cow, obstacle course.
8. Spoon dolls, needlepoint, make bread or granola and place in bandana, make a wagon using cardboard, spray paint, etc.

Updated in: 1999

Grade 3
- 180 -

Friend of Jesus
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements

1. Tell a friend about Jesus and how good He is to you.
2. Invite a friend to a meeting at your church.
3. With your counselor or other adult helper, prepare a devotional or a prayer to be given at Sabbath School, a club meeting, or school.
4. Take part in a missionary (outreach or witnessing) activity.
5. Attend a baptism and discuss what it means.
6. Explain what it means to be a friend of Jesus and name five friends of
Jesus listed in your Bible.
7. Speak kindly to your family and friends. Discuss how being kind and courteous is also being a friend of Jesus.
8. Be able to pray at mealtime and at bedtime.

- 181 -

Supporting Answers

1. Help the Adventurers learn to verbalize their love for Jesus and to share that love with others. Encourage them to pray simple prayers to express their love for Jesus (also for point number 8).
2. Encourage the Adventurers to invite a non-SDA friend. Discuss how they can be a good example by sitting quietly in church, walking softly, whispering only, singing, kneeling for prayer, being kind, etc.
3. Help the Adventurers prepare a simple talk appropriate for their age group; encourage their own ideas.
4. Talk with your pastor and get involved in outreach programs of your church. 5. Explain the reasons for baptism and tell the Adventurers that it was
Jesus’ example for us. See that each child has the opportunity to attend a baptismal service.
6. Children may list Jesus’ disciples or other friends such as Mary, Martha,
Lazarus, etc. To be a friend of Jesus means to accept His friendship and love and to share both with others.
7. Jesus knows our thoughts and actions. Because He loves us, we love
Him and everything He has made, including our families and friends.
Expressing kindness to others is showing our love for Jesus.
8. Teach the Adventurers the basic elements of prayer, including praise, thanksgiving, cleansing from sin, commitment, etc.

Updated in:

Grade
- 182 -

1

Fru its of the Spirit
Originated in: North American Division

Requirements

1. Choose a “Fruit of the Spirit” from Gal. 5:22 and 23, then memorize the verses. 2. Find a Bible verse that explains your specific “Fruit of the Spirit.”
3. Find a story in the Bible depicting your chosen “Fruit of the Spirit.”
Role-play the story.
4. Draw a picture depicting your chosen “Fruit of the Spirit” in action
5. Learn a song or make-up a song depicting your chosen “Fruit of the
Spirit.”
6. Tell a story about when you displayed or acted out your chosen “Fruit of the Spirit” without being told to do it.
7. Make a craft that represents or helps you to understand the meaning of your chosen “Fruit of the Spirit.”

- 183 -

Supporting Answers

1. The fruits are: love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, faithfulness, gentleness and self-control.
2. Check in your Bible concordance.
5. Steve Green has a tape entitled “Hide ‘em in Your Heart.”

Updated in: 2008

Grade 4
- 184 -

My Church
Originated in: North American Division

Requirements

1. Understand the meaning and memorize I Corinthians 3:16 and learn the song “Lord, Prepare Me to Be a Sanctuary.”
2. Know the name of your church and write the address. As a club, draw a mural with the church in the center and include each Adventurer’s house in relation to your church, naming all roads and streets as a map to the church.
3. Who is your pastor and what is his/her responsibility? Ask the following questions:
a. Why did you decide to become a pastor?
b. At what age did you decide to become a pastor?
c. Was there something that happened in your life that caused you to want to be a pastor?
d. Can I be a pastor, if God calls me?
e. How can I prepare for a life to serve God?
f. How can I be a minister right now?
4. Draw the floor plan of your church. If your church has the following, label them on your map:
a. Sanctuary
b. Church Office
c. Your Sabbath school room
d. Fellowship Hall
e. Restrooms
f. Adventurer Room
g. Community Service Room
5. What is a church board and what is its function?
6. Name ten members on the church board. What position(s) do they hold? 7. Explain how you can help God in your church every week, starting this week. - 185 -

Supporting Answers

1. Exodus 25:8
2. Parents should help their children.
3. Make a list of questions for your pastor prior to arrival. Examples are listed. 4. Leader, give the Adventurers a tour of the church. Then have the
Adventurers act as tour guides to the different rooms or areas of the church. Next, ask the Adventurers to label a pre-drawn map of the church inserting the different rooms into the correct localities.
5. Invite the pastor and board members to model a board meeting during an Adventurer club meeting. Optional – role-play a board meeting using a child-friendly agenda. Ask the Adventurers to pretend to be adults sitting as active members on a board. Optional – have a staff meeting so the Adventurers may see all that goes into getting a meeting ready for them. (Suggestion: On the Adventurer Sabbath, say “Thank you for guiding our church.”)
6. Discuss work done, type of personality and experience needed for each position. Help the Adventurers choose different people for interviewing.
Create a list of questions together and use them while interviewing.
Think about the following:
a. Talk about each position and explain each role and the service given to God. (Most church positions are volunteer.)
b. What position would each child prefer most? Why?
c. Discuss with the children how to prepare for a life of service dedicated to God. Discuss what kind of education would help each child prepare for their favorite job.
7. a. Children should help the teacher by leaving each room neat and orderly after Sabbath school.
b. Never leave stray items, paper, bulletins, hymnals, Bibles, or other items out of place in the Sanctuary as you leave the church service.
c. Be helpful and cheerful to everyone you meet at church.

Updated in: 2007

Grade 4
- 186 -

Pearly Gate
Originated in: North American Division

Requirements

This award is intended to make children aware of and look forward to the
Second Coming and Heaven.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Find and read a promise of Jesus’ Second Coming in the Bible.
Act out a parable from the Bible about Jesus’ Second Coming.
Name a Bible book and chapter that describes Last Day events.
Make a list of the signs of Jesus’ Second Coming found in Matt. 24:3-14.
Describe Jesus’ ascension of Heaven and tell how it is like or unlike the way He will return.
6. Find and read a description of the Holy City or New Earth in the Bible.
7. Complete and memorize John 14:2,3 using one of the following activities: a. Fill in the blanks:
b. “In my Father’s _______ are many _______; if it were not so I would have _____ ____. I go to _______ __ ______ for you. And if I go and
_________________, I will _____ _____, and receive you unto ______; that where ______, there _____ may be also.”
c. Put each word on an index card (one word/card), and have the children put the cards in order.
d. Help make a rebus of the memory verse.
e. Hide pieces of the puzzle and make a game for the Parable of Lost
Coins with them.
8. Close your eyes and imagine meeting Jesus at the Pearly Gate, then either draw a picture of what you imagined or create what the Pearly
Gate would look like.

- 187 -

Supporting Answers

1. John 14:1-3; Acts 1:11
2. The Ten Virgins, Matt, 25:1-13; The Net, Matt. 13:47,48; The Wicked
Tenants, Matt. 21:33; Mark 12:1-10; Luke 20:9-16; The Great Banquet,
Luke 14:16-24; Matt. 22:1-14; The Lost Coin, Luke 15:8-10; The Narrow
Door, Matt. 7:13,14; Luke 13:22-30; The Weeds, Matt. 24-30; The Lost
Sheep, Luke 15:3-7; The Sower, Matt. 13:3-23; Others.
3. Matt. 24
4. False Christ (v.5), wars and fall of kingdoms (v.6-7), famine and earthquakes (v.7), persecution (9), turning away (v.10), false prophets
(v.11), increased wickedness and love growing cold (v.12), gospel to all the world (v.14).
5. 1 Thessalonians 4:15-18, Acts 1:1-8.
6. Isaiah 65:17-25; Rev. 21, 22.
7. Provide heavy paper, markers, scissors.
8. Have available paper, markers/crayons, popsicle sticks, glitter, construction paper, pearls, foil, etc.

Updated in: 1999

Grade 4
- 188 -

Prayer
Originated in: North American Division

Requirements

1. Explain why we pray, what things we pray for, and how we pray. Read
Isaiah 40:31.
2. Read Matthew 6:5-15, the Lord’s Prayer.
3. Pray to God and Jesus three times a day for one week. Read 1
Thessalonians 5:17.
4. Teach someone you know about praying and say a prayer with him/her.
5. Do three or more of the following:
a. Make a prayer request chart and ask people if they have a prayer request and pray for them.
b. Lead out in a club opening or closing prayer.
c. Make a card with a prayer in it and give it to someone.
d. Ask the pastor about prayer.
e. Have a prayer breakfast for kids and parents.
f. Make a prayer journal and see how God answers prayer.

- 189 -

Supporting Answers

1. We pray to stay close to Jesus because He is our very best friend and we want to be like Him. Read Mark 1:35. We pray to thank Him for His love and care, to ask for forgiveness, and to help others and ourselves. Read
James 5:16. We should have a quiet time each day with Jesus, but we can pray any time, anywhere.
2. Discuss the Lord’s Prayer with children.
3. Ask parents to encourage children to pray and to make it a daily habit.
Provide resources for parents on how to teach children about quiet time with Jesus.
4. Discuss how to teach someone to pray.
5. All activities included in worksheet. Discuss with children how each of these activities can be done. For the prayer breakfast, invite kids of all ages to attend and have a child give the message.

Updated in: 2006

Grade 3
- 190 -

Prayer Warrior
Originated in: North American Division

Requirements

1. Read what Paul said about the armor of God (Ephesians 6:11-18) and make a poster or craft showing the armor of God.
2. Name five Old Testament prayer warriors and read one of their stories from the Bible. How were their lives changed by talking with God?
3. Discuss how and where to pray.
4. Learn who we should pray for and write a prayer of your own. Read this prayer in the Adventurer Club, Sabbath school class, or during church service. 5. Discuss why you pray.
6. Take a prayer walk with the Adventurers or your family. Talk about the way you felt during the walk.

- 191 -

Supporting Answers

1. Belt of truth; breastplate of righteousness; boots of peace; shield of faith; helmet of salvation; sword of the Word of God.
2. Examples: Abraham (Gen. 12); Joseph (Gen.41); Moses (Exodus 16);
Joshua (Joshua 5); Gideon (Judges 6); Samuel (I Samuel 3); David
(Psalm 41 & I Samuel 17); Daniel (Daniel 6).
3. Prayer
a. Ways –Pray out loud or silently; pray with others or by yourself; sing; journaling (writing down your prayers); telephone prayer
(pray with someone on the phone).
b. Places – By your bed; at the breakfast table; in the car; on your bike; while taking a walk; in Sabbath School; at a hospital; anywhere!
4. Pray for yourself, family members, friends, enemies, pets, church family, church workers, the unsaved, the sick, neighbors.
5. To praise God, to say you’re sorry, ask for forgiveness, tell God thank you, and pray for others and yourself.
6. Did you feel better after the walk? Did you feel close to God? Did what you see make you feel thankful or give you things to pray about?

Updated in: 2005

Grade 4
- 192 -

Rai nbow Promise
Originated in: North American Division

Requirements
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Show the two elements that make a rainbow.
Find who saw the very first rainbow in Gen. 9:8-17.
What is a covenant?
What does the rainbow promise us?
What colors make up the rainbow? Create your own rainbow with the colors in their right order.
6. Where will we find a rainbow in heaven?

- 193 -

Supporting Answers

1. Create a rainbow with water and light or demonstrate with a prism.
2. Put each event of the story of Noah on index cards. Have children draw a card from a box or container and put in correct sequence.
3. Find covenant in an elementary dictionary. Discuss the meaning with children until they understand that it means “promise.” Have the children print the word “PROMISE” on a card.
4. Read Gen. 9:11 and/or Gen. 8:21.
5. Red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet. An easy way to remember the order is to think of the order as a man’s name—Roy G.
Biv.
a. The following are the colors and examples of God’s awesome character: Red—Redeemer—Ephesians 1:7, Orange—Offering—John 1:29. The
Lamb was a sacrifice offering for sin.
Yellow—YEAH!—God is always cheering for us. He is always there cheering for us. (Example: The Lost Coin, Luke 15:8-10)
Green—Giving—John 3:16
Blue—BIG—Our God is awesome (Example: Moses and the Red Sea)
Indigo—Imannuel—Matt. 1:23
Violet—Victorious—Psalm 60:12
b. Rainbow craft: Using the felt strips, glue, dowel, glitter and printed words for God’s character, make a beautiful rainbow.
c. We are like little drops of “rain” that God uses to refresh the earth
(our family, our home, our friends, our neighbors). When we let the light of Jesus shine through us, others will see the “rainbow” of His love. Invite children to let Jesus make their life like a rainbow.
6. Revelation 4:3.

Updated in: 1999

Grade 4
- 194 -

Ste ps to Jesus
Originated in: North American Division

Requirements

1. Understand the steps to salvation:
a. God is love (1 John 4:8). God loves me very much (Jer. 31:3). God loves everyone (John 3:16).
b. I am a sinner. Everyone does wrong and is a sinner, thus everyone needs salvation because sinners will die forever (Rom 3:23).
c. God sent Jesus to die so I wouldn’t have to die forever (John 3:16).
Then He rose again as my Savior (1Cor. 5:3, 4). When I receive
Jesus, all my sins will be forgiven (Isa. 1:18; Ps. 51:7-11; 1 John 2:1,
2).
d. Salvation is a gift God gives me. I must personally ask Jesus to be my Savior.
e. (John 1:12). God hears me when I pray.
f. If I have accepted Jesus, I have become a new person, one who doesn’t want to do wrong because I love Jesus and Jesus loves me
(John 3:3-7; 2 Cor. 5:17).
g. I can be sure that I am saved when I have asked Jesus to be my
Savior (John 3:26; Heb. 13:5). Because I am sinful, I will still make mistakes. But I if I confess my sins to Jesus, He will forgive me and remove my guilt completely (Jer. 31:34). God wants me to confess to others who are hurt by my actions (1 John 1:9) and make restitution to them (Luke 19:8), and then totally turn away from sin
(John 8:11).
2. Read and discuss with an adult four of the following Bible stories on conversion/salvation: a. The Ethiopian converted (Acts 8:26-40)
b. Naaman washed clean (2 Kings 5)
c. Jesus loves children (Matt. 19:13-15
d. The lost coin, sheep, and son (Luke 15)
e. Zacchaeus (Luke 19:1-10)
f. Jailer converted (Acts 16:21-34)
3. Memorize John 3:16, Acts 16:31, and 1 John 1:9
4. Spend regular quiet time with Jesus.
5. Make a personal choice to accept Jesus as Savior and Lord. Discuss your decision with a parent or club teacher.
a. Trace around your foot on paper and decorate any way you like, including the words of commitment: I _____(your name) have taken my first steps to Jesus today____(date) with ____(adult witness’
- 195 -

name).
b. Show the foot (commitment response to a club teacher, to receive a certificate and award patch.

1. Make these concepts as simple as needed for the child to grasp. The most important concept is that she/he recognize the nature of sin
(wrong doing) and its consequences (eternal death), and that they ask
Jesus to forgive and be his/her Savior.
2. These stories would make great children’s church sermons, club devotionals, or family worship. Create wonder-inspiring moments for the child to understand God’s great interest in his/her salvation.
3. Suggestion: illustrate the texts on a bookmark for their personal Bible or give to someone who wants to know more about Jesus.
4. Encourage a planned, regular time with God—can be with parent, family worship, club, or alone. Commitment is key.
5. Personal commitment in young children is often spontaneous and publicly shown. But this award encourages a personal decision made contemplatively at home with parents. However, when a home-inspired decision is not possible, a teacher or other caring individual may be the best one to nurture this first step as privately as possible. Warmly welcome the child as the newest member of the family of God, assuring them of God’s unfailing love, acceptance, forgiveness, and great care. An extra project is recommended. Encourage the child to further respond in their own way—create a song, poem, painting, drawing, sculpture, or express themselves with video, camera, or computer (but never force).

Supporting Answers

Updated in: 2004

Grade 4
- 196 -

Temperance
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements

1. Read and discuss:
a. 1 Cor. 6:19, 20
b. 1 Cor. 3:17
2. Tell what is meant by:
a. Drug abuse
b. Temperance
3. Do one of the following:
a. Talk to a doctor/nurse or discuss with another adult the harm in using: i.
Tobacco
ii.
Alcohol
iii.
Other drugs
b. Watch and discuss a film or video on the dangers of using any of the above. 4. Tell why some people choose to smoke, drink alcohol, or use drugs. Tell how we can choose not to use them ourselves.
5. Plan a skit encouraging others to say “NO” and perform it with your group. 6. Make an anti-smoking, anti-drug, or anti-alcohol design and paint it on a T-shirt, OR Create a poster showing the dangers of drug abuse.
7. Identify two famous persons who do not use any tobacco, drugs, or alcohol, and who are among the best in their field. OR Interview two people you know who live happily and healthfully without using tobacco, drugs, or alcohol, and discuss with them their reasons for not using those things.

- 197 -

Supporting Answers

1. Use a modern version of the Bible so the Adventurers will understand its language.
2. Drug abuse is the misuse of any drug or medication. Temperance means self-control in any aspect of life, including the use of harmful substances. 3. Invite a doctor or nurse to your group meeting. If that is not possible, view one of the many videos on the subject that are available from public health offices or public libraries.
4. Encourage each Adventurer to participate in this discussion.
5. The skit or play may be performed at school or in a church related activity. 6. Provide the necessary materials and supervise this activity carefully.
7. Sports magazines will be helpful. If you choose to have the Adventurers interview people, help them make a list of questions and make the necessary appointments well in advance.

Updated in: 1996

Grade 3
- 198 -

Wise Steward
Originated in: General Conference

Requirements

1. Describe a wise steward.
2. With an adult, find a text in the Bible that tells who owns everything on earth. 3. Explain Malachi 3:8-10. Be able to fill out your own tithe envelope.
4. Make a poster showing some of the things your Sabbath school offerings are used for.
5. Listen to the Bible story of a widow and her small offering.
6. Tell how and why a wise steward will care for his or her belongings.

- 199 -

Supporting Answers

1. A wise steward is one who carefully performs his or her duty and takes good care of the things God has given to all of us (environment, our bodies, our minds, our talents, etc.).
2. See Genesis 1, 2; Psalm 33:6, 9.
3. Malachi says that we are to give our tithes and offerings to God. We do this when we give an offering or return tithe at church. He will surely bless those who faithfully do this.
4. Use magazine pictures or draw and color items that our Sabbath School offerings can buy (Bibles, Sabbath school papers, felts and pictures to illustrate Bible stories, Sabbath school meeting areas and much more).
This may be a group activity. Place the completed poster where others may enjoy it.
5. Read Counsels to Stewardship by Ellen G. White, pages 174-176, and then retell the story of the widow and her two mites in language that the Adventurers will understand.
6. A wise steward will take special care of his or her belongings and finances as well as of the talents that God has given him or her.

Updated in: 1996

Grade 3
- 200 -

Title

Level

Artist

1

Creator

Archery

1
3

GC

Astronomer

Basket Maker
Bead Craft
Bible I

Bible II

Bible Royalty
Build and Fly

Building Blocks
Butterfly
Buttons
Camper

Canoeing

Caring Friend
Carpenter
Collector

Computer Skills
Cooking Fun
Country Fun
Courtesy
Cyclist

Disciples

Early Adventist Pioneer
Environmentalist

Feathered Friends
First Aid Helper
Fish

Fitness Fun
Flowers

Friend of Animals
Friend of Jesus

Friend of Nature

Fruits of the Spirit
Gardener
Geologist

EUD

Recreation

121

Page

GC

Arts&Crafts

19

GC

3

Category

Spiritual

171

Arts&Crafts

27

GC

4

GC

1
4

GC

4

NAD

1

NAD

3

Nature

Arts&Crafts
Arts&Crafts
Spiritual
Spiritual

83
21
23

173
175

GC

NAD

3

Arts&Crafts
Recreation

123

Recreation

129

NAD

1

NAD

2
1

EUD

4

GC

4

GC

2

GC

4

NAD

3

GC

2

Nature

Arts&Crafts
Recreation
Recreation

Arts&Crafts
Recreation

GC

Household Arts

NAD

2

Spiritual

NAD

2

GC

3
3

NAD

4

NAD

2

GC

3

Recreation

Household Arts
Recreation
Spiritual
Nature
Nature

GC

NAD

1

Recreation
Nature

NAD

2

GC

1

GC

1
1

GC

2

NAD

4

NAD

2

GC

4

GC

- 201 -

Nature

Recreation
Nature

Spiritual
Nature

Spiritual

Household Arts
Nature

25
85
29

125
127
31

131
65

133
67

135
177
179
87
89

137
91

139
93
95

181
97

183
69
99

Title

Level

Guide

2

Creator

Glue Right

1

NAD

3

GC

NAD

Gymnast
Habitat

Hand Shadows
Handicraft

Health Specialist
Home Craft

Home Helper
Honey

Honeybee

Horsemanship
Hygiene

Knot Tying
Ladybugs
Lizards

Magnet Fun I

Magnet Fun II
Media Critic

Music Maker
My Church

My Picture Book
Olympic

Outdoor Explorer
Pearly Gate
Postcards
Prayer

Prayer Warrior

Rainbow Promise
Reporter

Road Safety

Safety Specialist
Sewing Fun

Sign Language
Skater
Skier

3

GC

4

NAD

2

GC

1

GC

3

GC

1

GC

3

NAD

4

NAD

2

EUD

4

Category

Arts&Crafts

Page

Recreation

Arts&Crafts

141

Arts&Crafts

35
37

Recreation
Nature

Recreation

Household Arts
Household Arts
Nature
Nature

Recreation

GC

NAD

1

Household Arts
Arts&Crafts

EUD

2

NAD

3

GC

3

NAD

3
3

NAD

1

GC

4

NAD

4

NAD

3

NAD

4

GC

4

NAD

3

Recreation
Nature
Nature

Arts&Crafts
Arts&Crafts
Arts&Crafts

NAD

4
2

GC

1

GC

3

GC

4

NAD

4

GC

2

GC

- 202 -

71
73

103
105
147
75

149
107
109
39
41
43
45

187

Nature

Arts&Crafts

NAD

4

145

Spiritual

Recreation

GC

4

101

185

Arts&Crafts

NAD

143

Spiritual

Arts&Crafts

NAD

3

33

Spiritual
Spiritual
Spiritual

Recreation
Recreation

Household Arts
Arts&Crafts
Recreation
Recreation

47

151
111
49

189
191
193
51

153
155
77
53

157
159

Spotter
Title

Stamping Fun Art
Steps to Jesus
Swimmer I

Swimmer II

Temperance
Tin Can Fun
Trees

Troubadour
Whale

Wise Steward

Level

1

Creator

4

Recreation

Page

NAD

GC

3
3

GC

Arts&Crafts
Recreation

55

GC

4

Category

Spiritual

165

NAD

1

GC

Spiritual

Recreation

3

NAD

Arts&Crafts

3

GC

Spiritual

2

GC

3

GC

2

NAD

- 203 -

Nature

Arts&Crafts
Nature

161
195
163
197
57

113
59

115
199

- 204 -

- 205 -

- 206 -…...

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