Free Essay

Jot Toy Company

In: Business and Management

Submitted By mujakachi
Words 2545
Pages 11
Scarce skills
Jobs are scarce. What plan can you make to secure a job in today’s world of work? The answer is to study for a scarce skill!
What is a scarce skill?
A scarce skill is a qualification or job for which there are too little people in South Africa doing the job. Government would like to set South Africa on a winning economic pathway, by developing the skills of our people and assisting people to find employment more easily. Studying for a scarce skill would not only mean helping your country, but also helping yourself! A scarcity in qualifications or jobs, can come from the fact that the occupation is new and very few people have studied to fill these posts.
It can also happen that people have not chosen to study for the course and a scarcity developed in the job. Sometimes special experience is required, for example people with years of experience of management, or in other cases people are needed in certain towns, cities or geographical areas. Scarcity can also be in terms of equity, for example too few women enter into a specific career.
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How can you benefit?
Choose to study for a scarce skill. Not only will you be able to find a job more easily, but chances are that you will be paid better and progress to the top of your career path more easily, because employers will snap you up. Also, some qualifications are scarce all over the world, which means that opportunities open up for you much more easily.
You can make an appointment with one of the Department’s careers counsellors to assist you to choose a scarce skill that will suit your abilities and interests. This will assist you to be really happy and more productive in your chosen career. This can lead to even more benefits for you, since you will give your best.
The Department of Labour supports many skills development programmes in the area of scarce skills, for example in learnerships, apprenticeships and bursaries, to support Government’s drive to place the unemployed in jobs and develop the skills of our citizens. This means that studying is made easier for you.
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Which jobs are scarce?
The Department draws up a National Scarce Skills List every year. The
Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) do research and consult with stakeholders in the sector of the economy that they are responsible for and then send the list to the Department. The National Scarce Skills
List can be found on the Department of Labour’s website
(www.labour.gov.za, use the search engine and type “scarce skills”). An extract is provided in this pamphlet to help you consider and plan your options. Main occupational groups are provided with some jobs within the main occupational group. Tick the ones you are interested in and do some research on them to see whether you are a match for the job
(the careers counsellors can help you with careers information.)
Managers
Chief Executives, General Managers and Legislators: Chief Executives and Managing Directors,(Enterprise/Organisations) General Managers,
Senior Government and Local Government Officials.
Specialist Managers: Advertising, Marketing and Sales Managers;
Corporate (Administration and Business) Services Managers, Finance
Managers includes Municipal, Finance Managers and Audit Managers)
Human Resource Managers, Policy and Planning Managers, Research and Development Managers, Contract, Programme and Project
Managers.
Construction, Distribution and Production/Operations Managers:
Construction Managers; Engineering Managers; Production/Operations
Managers; Supply and Distribution Managers (includes Logistics
Managers)
Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Managers:
Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Managers.
Events, Hospitality, Retail and Service Managers: Retail Managers, Call or Contact Centre and Customer Service Managers, Event and
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Conference Managers, Transport Services Managers, Miscellaneous
Hospitality, Retail and Service Managers.
Miscellaneous Specialist Managers: Safety and Security Managers,
Other Specialist Managers (includes Environmental, Arts and Culture,
Office and Quality Managers).
Professionals
Arts and Media Professionals: Music Professionals, Photographers,
Authors and Book and Script Editors, Actors, Dancers, and other
Entertainers, Miscellaneous Arts Professionals (includes Textile and
Multimedia Artists) Artistic Directors and Media Practitioners and
Presenters, Film, Television, Radio and Stage Directors, Journalist,
Other Writers and Editors.
Accountants, Auditors and Company Secretaries: Accountants,
Auditors, Company Secretaries and Corporate Treasurers
Financial Brokers and Dealers and Investment Advisors: Financial
Investment Advisers and Managers, Financial Brokers.
Human Resource and Training Professionals: Human Resource
Professionals, ICT Trainers, Training and Development Professionals.
Information and Organisation Professionals: Actuaries, Mathematicians and Statisticians, Economists, Archivists, Curators and Records Managers,
Land Property and Assets Economists and Valuers, Management and
Organisation Analysts, Librarians, Miscellaneous Information and
Organisation Analysts.
Sales Marketing and Public Relations Professionals: Advertising and
Marketing Professionals, ICT Sales Professionals, Public
Relations/Communication Management Professionals, Technical Sales
Representatives.
Air and Marine Transport Professionals: Air Transport Professionals and
Marine Transport Professionals.
Architects, Designers, Planners and Surveyors: Architects and
Landscape Architects, Cartographers and Surveyors, Graphic and Web
Designers and Illustrators, Fashion, Industrial and Jewellery Designers,
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Urban and Regional Planners.
Engineering Professionals: Chemical and Materials Engineers and
Technologists, Civil Engineers and Technologists and Quantity Surveyors,
Electrical Engineer and Technologists, Electronics and
Telecommunication Engineers and Technologists, Industrial and
Mechanical Engineers and Technologists, Mining Engineers and
Technologists, Miscellaneous Engineering Professionals including
Aeronautical and Avionics Engineers.
Natural and Physical Science Professionals: Chemists, and food and
Wine Scientists, Environmental Scientists, Geologists and Geophysicists and Earth Science Technologists, Agriculture and Forestry Scientists,
Medical and Laboratory Scientists and Technologists, Miscellaneous
Natural and Physical Science Professionals, Veterinarians.
School Teachers: Early Childhood Development Practitioners,
Foundation Phase School Teachers, Intermediate and Senior Phase
School Teachers, Further Education and Training Teachers and Lecturers,
Special Education Teachers.
Miscellaneous Education and Training Professionals: Education and
Training Advisors and Reviewers.
Health Diagnostic and Promotion Professionals: Medical Imaging
Professionals, Occupational and Environmental Health Professionals,
Pharmacists (includes Pharmacist Assistants).
Health Therapy Professionals: Speech Professionals and Audiologists,
Miscellaneous Therapy Professionals.
Midwifery and Nursing Professionals: Registered Nurses.
Business and Systems Analysts, and Programmers: ICT Business and
Systems Analysts, Multimedia Specialists and Web Developers, Software and Applications Programmers.
Database and Systems Administrators, and ICT Security Specialists:
Database and Systems Administrators, and ICT Security Specialists.
ICT Network and Support Professionals: Computer Network
Professionals, ICT Support and Test Engineers, Telecommunications
Engineering Professionals.
Legal Professionals: Solicitors.
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Social and Welfare Professionals: Psychologists, Social Workers,
Counsellors.
Technician and Trades Workers
Agricultural, Medical and Science Technicians: Agricultural
Technicians, Medical Technicians, Chemistry, Food and Beverage
Technicians, other Miscellenous Science Technicians.
Building and Engineering Technicians: Architectural, Building and
Surveying Technicians, Civil Engineering Draftspersons and Technicians,
Electrical Engineering Draftspersons and Technicians, Electronic
Engineering Draftspersons and Technicians (includes Avionics
Technicians), Mechanical Engineering Draftspersons and Technicians,
Safety Inspectors, Miscellaneous Building and Engineering Draftsperson and Technicians.
ICT and Telecommunications Technicians: ICT Support Technicians,
Telecommunications Technical Specialists.
Manufacturing and Process Technicians: Power Plant Processing
Technicians.
Automotive Electricians and Mechanics: Automotive Electricians, Motor
Mechanics.
Fabrication Engineering Trades Workers: Sheetmetal Trades Workers,
Structural Steel and Welding Trades Workers (includes Boilermakers and
Welders) Metal Casting, Forging and Finishing Trades Workers.
Mechanical Engineering Trades Workers: Metal Fitters and Machinists
(includes Mechanics), Precision Metal Trades Workers (includes
Instrument Mechanics), Toolmakers and Engineering Patternmakers
(includes Moulders and Tool, Jig and Die Makers), Millwrights and
Mechatronics Trades Workers.
Panelbeaters, and Vehicle Body Builders, Trimmers and Painters:
Panelbeaters, Vehicle Body Builders and Trimmers, Vehicle Painters.
Bricklayers, Carpenters and Joiners: Bricklayers and Stonemasons,
Carpenters and Joiners.
Floor Finishers and Painting Trades Workers: Painting Trades Workers.
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Glaziers, Plasterers and Tilers: Plasterers, Wall and Floor Tilers, Roof Tilers,
Glaziers.
Plumbers: Plumbers.
Electrotechnology and Telecommunications Trades Workers: Domestic
Radio and Television Mechanic.
Electricians: Electricians.
Electronics and Telecommunications Trades Workers: Airconditioning and Refrigeration Mechanics, Electrical Distribution Trades Workers,
Electronics Trades Workers, Telecommunications Trades Workers.
Food Trades Workers: Bakers and Pastrycooks, Butchers and Smallgoods
Makers, Chefs.
Animal Attendants and Trainers: Animal Attendants Trainers and
Shearers.
Printing Trades Workers: Binders, Finishers and Screen Printers, Graphic
Pre-press Trades Workers, Printers.
Other Technicians and Trades Workers: Boat Builders and Shipwrights,
Chemical, Gas, Petroleum, Power Generation Plant Operators, Gallery,
Library and Museum Technicians, Jewellers, Performing Arts Technicians,
Optical Laboratory Assistants.
Health and Welfare Support Workers: Ambulance Officers and
Paramedics, Enrolled and Mother Craft Nurses, Welfare Support Workers
(includes Community and Youth Workers).
Child Carers and Education Aides: Child Carers, Education Aides
Personal Carers and Assistants: Dental Assistants.
Hospitality Workers: Hotel, Hospitality and Service Managers.
Defence Force Members, Fire and Rescue Officials and Police: South
African National Defence Force Members.
Personal Service and Travel Workers: Beauty Therapists, Funeral Workers
(includes Funeral Directors), Gallery, Museum and Tour Guides, Tourism and Travel Advisers, Travel Attendants, Miscellaneous Personal Service
Workers.
Sports and Fitness Workers: Fitness Instructors, Sports Coaches,
Instructors and Officials.
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Clerical and Administrative Workers
Contract, Programme, Project and Office Administrators: Contract,
Programme and Project Administrators, Office Administrators.
Personal Assistants and Secretaries: Personnel Assistants, Secretaries.
General Clerical Workers: General Clerks, Keyboard Operators.
Call or Contact Centre Information Clerks: Call or Contact Centre
Workers.
Receptionist: Receptionist.
Accounting Clerks and Bookkeepers: Accounting Clerks, Bookkeepers
Financial and Insurance Clerks: Bank Workers, Credit and Loans
Officers, Clerical and Office Support Workers: Couriers and Postal
Deliverers, Mail Sorters, Survey Interviewers.
Purchasing, Supply, Transport and Despatch Administrators:
Purchasing and Supply Logistics Administrators, Transport and Despatch
Clerks.
Miscellaneous Administrative Workers: Debt Collectors, Other
Miscellaneous Clerical and Administrative Workers.
Sales Workers
Insurance Agents and Sales Representatives: Insurance Agents, Sales
Representatives.
Real Estate Sales Agents: Real Estate Sales Agents, Real Estate Agency
Principals.
Sales Assistants and Salespersons: Sales Assistants (General), ICT Sales
Assistants, Motor Vehicles and Vehicle Parts Salespersons, Retail
Supervisors.
Sales Support Workers: Telemarketers, Visual Merchandisers.
Machinery operators and drivers
Machine Operators: Clay, Concrete, Glass and Stone Processing
Machine Operators, Industrial Spray Painters, Paper and Wood Processing
9
Machine Operators, Plastic and Rubber Production Machine Operators,
Sewing Machinists, Miscellaneous Machine Operators.
Stationary Plant Operators: Crane, Hoist and Lift Operators, Drillers,
Miners and Shot Firers, Engineering Production System Workers, Other
Stationary Plant Operators.
Mobile Plant Operators: Earthmoving Plant Operators, Forklift Drivers,
Other Mobile Plant Operators.
Automobile, Bus and Rail Drivers: Bus and Coach Drivers, Automobile
Drivers, Train Drivers.
Truck Drivers: Truck Drivers.
Delivery Drivers: Delivery Drivers.
Store Persons: Store Persons.
Elementary workers
Cleaners and Laundry Workers: Commercial Cleaners, Textile and
Laundry Workers.
Construction and Mining Workers: Building and Plumbing Workers,
Concreters, Structural Steel Construction Workers, Other Construction,
Mining and Metal Workers, Insulation and Home Improvement Installers.
Factory Process Workers: Produce Packers and Handlers, Product
Assemblers.
Other Factory Process Workers: Manufacturing Engineering Process
Workers, Plastic and Rubber Factory Workers, Product Quality Controllers,
Timber and Wood Process Workers.
Farm, Forestry and Garden Workers: Forestry and Logging Workers.
Freight Handlers and Shelf Fillers: Freight and Furniture Handlers.
Other Workers: Deck and Fishing Hands, Handypersons, Motor Vehicle
Parts and Accessories Fitters, Printing Assistants and Table Workers.
10
11
Eastern Cape
Aliwal North Tel: (051) 633 2633
Butterworth Tel: (047) 491 0656
Cradock Tel: (048) 881 3010
East London Tel: (043) 702 7500
Fort Beaufort Tel: (046) 645 4686
Graaf-Reinet Tel: (049) 892 2142
Grahamstown Tel: (046) 622 2104
King William’s Tel: (043) 643 4756
Town
Lusikisiki Tel: (039) 253 1996
Maclear Tel: (045) 932 1424
Mdantsane Tel: (043) 761 3151
Mount Ayliff Tel: (039) 254 0282
Mthatha Tel: (047) 501 5600
Port Elizabeth Tel: (041) 582 4472
Queenstown Tel: (045) 807 5400
Uitenhage Tel: (041) 992 4627
Free State
Bethlehem Tel: (058) 303 5293
Bloemfontein Tel: (051) 505 6201
Botshabelo Tel: (051) 534 3789
Ficksburg Tel: (051) 933 2299
Harrismith Tel: (058) 623 2977
Kroonstad Tel: (056) 215 1812
Petrusburg Tel: (053) 574 0932
Phuthaditjhaba Tel: (058) 713 0373
Sasolburg Tel: (016) 970 3200
Welkom Tel: (057) 391 0200
Zastron Tel: (051) 673 1471
Gauteng North
Atteridgeville Tel: (012) 373 4435
Bronkhorstspruit Tel: (013) 932 0197
Garankuwa Tel: (012) 702 4525
Krugersdorp Tel: (011) 955 4420
Mamelodi Tel: (012) 812 9500
Pretoria Tel: (012) 309 5050
Randfontein Tel: (011) 693 3618
Soshanguve Tel: (012) 799 7400
Temba Tel: (071) 871 6509
Gauteng South
Alberton Tel: (011) 861 6130
Benoni Tel: (011) 747 9601
Boksburg Tel: (011) 898 3340
Brakpan Tel: (011) 744 9000
Carletonville Tel: (018) 788 3281
Germiston Tel: (011) 345 6300
Johannesburg Tel: (011) 223 1000
Kempton Park Tel: (011) 975 9301
Nigel Tel: (011) 814 7095
Randburg Tel: (011) 781 8144
Roodepoort Tel: (011) 766 2000
Sandton Tel: (011) 444 7631
Sebokeng Tel: (016) 592 3825
Soweto Tel: (011) 939 1200
Springs Tel: (011) 365 3700
Vanderbijlpark Tel: (016) 981 0280
Vereeniging Tel: (016) 430 0000
KwaZulu-Natal
Dundee Tel: (034) 212 3147
Durban Tel: (031) 336 1500
Estcourt Tel: (036) 352 2161
Kokstad Tel: (039) 727 2140
Ladysmith Tel: (036) 638 1900
Newcastle Tel: (034) 312 6038
Contact details
Eastern Cape
East London Tel: (043) 701 3000
Free State
Bloemfontein Tel: (051) 505 6200
Gauteng North
Pretoria Tel: (012) 309 5000
Gauteng South
Johannesburg Tel: (011) 853 0300
KwaZulu-Natal
Durban Tel: (031) 366 2000
Limpopo
Polokwane Tel: (015) 290 1744
Mpumalanga
Witbank Tel: (013) 655 8700
North West
Mmabatho Tel: (018) 387 8100
Northern Cape
Kimberley Tel: (053) 838 1500
Western Cape
Cape Town Tel: (021) 441 8000
Provincial Offices of the Department of Labour
Labour Centres of the Department of Labour
Pietermaritzburg Tel: (033) 341 5300
Pinetown Tel: (031) 701 7740
Port Shepstone Tel: (039) 682 2406
Prospecton Tel: (031) 913 9700
Richards Bay Tel: (035) 780 8700
Richmond Tel: (033) 212 2768
Stanger Tel: (032) 551 4291
Ulundi Tel: (035) 879 1439
Verulam Tel: (032) 541 5600
Vryheid Tel: (034) 980 8992
Limpopo
Giyani Tel: (015) 812 9041
Jane Furse Tel: (013) 265 7210
Lebowakgomo Tel: (015) 633 9360
Lephalale Tel: (014) 763 2162
Makhado Tel: (015) 516 0207
Modimolle Tel: (014) 717 1046
Mokopani Tel: (015) 491 5973
Phalaborwa Tel: (015) 781 5114
Polokwane Tel: (015) 299 5000
Seshego Tel: (015) 223 7020
Thohoyandou Tel: (015) 960 1300
Tzaneen Tel: (015) 306 2600
Mpumalanga
Baberton Tel: (013) 712 3066
Bethal Tel: (017) 647 5212
Carolina Tel: (017) 843 1077
Eerstehoek Tel: (017) 883 2414 eMalahleni Tel: (013) 653 3800
/ Witbank
Ermelo Tel: (017) 819 7632
Groblersdal Tel: (013) 262 3150
Kwamhlanga Tel: (013) 947 3173
KaMhlushwa Tel: (013) 785 0010
Lydenburg Tel: (013) 235 2368
Middelburg Tel: (013) 283 3600
Nelspruit Tel: (013) 753 2844
Piet Retief Tel: (017) 826 1883
Sabie Tel: (013) 764 2105
Secunda Tel: (017) 631 2594
Standerton Tel: (017) 712 1351
Volksrust Tel: (017) 735 2994
Northern Cape
Calvinia Tel: (027) 341 1280
De Aar Tel: (053) 631 0952
Kimberley Tel: (053) 838 1500
Kuruman Tel: (053) 712 3952
Postmasburg Tel: (053) 313 0641
Springbok Tel: (027) 718 1058
Upington Tel: (054) 331 1752
North West
Brits Tel: (012) 252 3068
Christiana Tel: (053) 441 2120
Klerksdorp Tel: (018) 464 8700
Lichtenburg Tel: (018) 632 4323
Mafikeng Tel: (018) 381 1010
Mogwase Tel: (014) 555 5693
Potchefstroom Tel: (018) 297 5100
Rustenburg Tel: (014) 592 8214
Taung Tel: (053) 994 1710
Vryburg Tel: (053) 927 5221
Western Cape
Beaufort West Tel: (023) 414 3427
Bellville Tel: (021) 941 7000
Cape Town Tel: (021) 468 5500
George Tel: (044) 801 1201
Knysna Tel: (044) 382 3150
Mitchell’s Plain Tel: (021) 391 0591
Mossel Bay Tel: (044) 691 1140
Oudtshoorn Tel: (044) 272 4370
Paarl Tel: (021) 872 2020
Somerset West Tel: (021) 852 2535
Vredenburg Tel: (022) 715 1627
Worcester Tel: (023) 347 0152
Layout and design by the Design Studio (Jani de Wet), Chief Directorate of Communication,
Department of Labour. Website: www.labour.gov.za…...

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...Report title Jot toy – case study University Rusangu University Team members Dina Nchenesi Busiku Siagwelele Relson TABLE OF CONTENT 1.0 Executive Summary This report aims to prioritize, analyse and evaluate the current issues of Jot management. The report starts with te 4main issues Jot is currently facing, the issues have been categorised in two, (i) issues that threaten the business (ii) plans relating to expansion and market. For the first issue, which is late delivery of Christmas product, the team recommend that Jot should distribute to the product preferring the major customers over smaller retailers. The second issue, fault in new flying spaceship, insulation should be improved. Near soring to voldania, Jot should implement the proposal as manufacturing in China is expensive. Jot should also accept the proposal to launch a new product range. Finally, ethical issues are addressed and recommendations are made. Financial and strategic analysis have been added in the appendices. INTRODUCTION Jot was established in 1988, it is a company that is specialized in relatively small range of 34 products aimed at only 2 age groups (the children between 3-5 and the children between 5-8). 3.0 Industry background Toy market is a highly seasoned market with most sales occurring in pre – Christmas periods (October – December) 86% of the world’s toys are Prioritisation of issues facing jot The......

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Jot Case Study

...manufacture was done by Jot in its home country itself, later due to bulk orders and popularity they outsourced manufacturing to China because of cheap labour 2) Over 80% of Jot’s product sales are sold to retailers for €20 or less. 3) Jot’s bank has been very responsive to the company’s needs for cash in order to fund its growth but has indicaJOT that at the present time it would not be able to provide any additional long-term finance. 4) As Jot builds up its inventory in preparation for higher levels of sales in quarters 3 and 4, cash flow is negative during the second half of the year. This is because outsourced manufacturing for the majority of all products occurs mainly from the end of quarter 2, during all of quarter 3 and the beginning of quarter 4. 5) Jot’s designers and sales team will have already decided on an indicative selling price, so the unit price to be charged to Jot by the outsourced manufacturing company is often the determining factor when making the decision of which outsourced manufacturing company to use. 6) Over 68% of Jot’s sales in the financial year ended 31 December 2011 were to these 7 customers based in Europe and the USA. The remaining 32% of sales are to distributors as well as small and medium sized retailers around the world. Jot currently has around 350 customers in total, including the 7 large customers. Strengths 1) Certified products 2) A good team. a) Own in-house team of designers who are involved in designing toys that are unique,......

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...Strategic Analysis and Recommendations for Jot Contents SWOT ANALYSIS ............................................................................................................................................ 4 STRENGTHS ................................................................................................ Error! Bookmark not defined. WEAKNESS ................................................................................................. Error! Bookmark not defined. THREATS ..................................................................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. Opportunities ............................................................................................. Error! Bookmark not defined. FINANCIAL ANALYSIS ..................................................................................................................................... 7 Current Ratios ........................................................................................................................................... 7 Quick ratio:................................................................................................................................................ 7 Net working Capital................................................................................................................................... 7 Debt Ratio: ......................................................................................................

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