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Implied Term Laid Down in Section 14 to Section 17 of Sale of Goods Act 1957

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Multicultural Collaboration | Main Section | Contributed by Tim BrownleeEdited by Jerry Schultz and Phil Rabinowitz |
What is "multicultural collaboration"?
Why is multicultural collaboration important?
When should you commit to multicultural collaboration?
What are some guidelines for multicultural collaboration?
How do you build a multicultural collaboration? As our society becomes more culturally diverse, organizations are understanding the need to work with other organizations in order to "turn up the sound," so their voices are heard and their issues will be addressed. This means that individuals and institutions can no longer deny the sometimes uncomfortable realities of cultural diversity. Organizers and activists are realizing that we have to come to grips with our multicultural society, or we won't get anything done. But how do we do that?
One Wisconsin labor activist says, "We want to include communities of color, but we just don't know where to begin. We hold open meetings, but no people of color even show up."
A neighborhood organization member in South Los Angeles, says, "Last year, we decided to move toward organizing in the Latino community for the simple reason that we have a lot of new immigrants from Central America in the neighborhoods. We wanted to make an authentic multicultural organization, but we learned an important lesson -- it doesn't just happen."
Many organizers have begun to come to grips with diversity issues, even though they may not have all the answers. These organizers realize they have to develop new strategies and tactics to attract multicultural interest in their collaborative initiatives. They also know there will be problems to solve if their collaborations are to be effective. This section will discuss how to help organizations collaborate effectively with people of different cultures. What is multicultural…...

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