Premium Essay

How Does Priestley Present Mr Birling

In: English and Literature

Submitted By meredith13
Words 3850
Pages 16
1. he predicts it's Curley for OMAM, Mr Birling for AIC
-Steinbeck can use the theme of fate to present Curley.
- Curley does not have to work hard like the others but still holds power because he is the Boss's son.
- Curley picked a fight with Lennie. Lennie hurt Curley. George asks slim "Slim, is Curleys old man gonna can us?" George is worried as Curley has authority because he is the Boss's son.
- Curley is said to be evil and was born with authority.
- Steinbeck uses Curley to highlight the American Dream. No matter how hard you work success only comes to those who are fated to receive it. This links to the theme of fate. And his fate has brought him power and authority because of what he can do and because he is the Boss's son.

he predicts it's Curley for OMAM, Mr Birling for AIC
-Steinbeck can use the theme of fate to present Curley.
- Curley does not have to work hard like the others but still holds power because he is the Boss's son.
- Curley picked a fight with Lennie. Lennie hurt Curley. George asks slim "Slim, is Curleys old man gonna can us?" George is worried as Curley has authority because he is the Boss's son.
- Curley is said to be evil and was born with authority.
- Steinbeck uses Curley to highlight the American Dream. No matter how hard you work success only comes to those who are fated to receive it. This links to the theme of fate. And his fate has brought him power and authority because of what he can do and because he is the Boss's son.

How Does Priestley Present Mr Birling

Priestley presents the character of Mr Birling as a symbol of the capitalist ruling class and the need for socialist ideals.

Priestley begins by presenting Mr Birling as a successful, albeit 'hard-headed businessman'. It is clear from the stage directions which tdescribe'The dining room... of a fairly large suburban house, belonging to a prosperous…...

Similar Documents

Premium Essay

How Does Shakespeare Present Love in Othello?

...Desdemona being the highest and Bianca being of the lowest. Each sexual relationship in the play provokes some jealousy between the couple. Bianca does not appear in the play as much as the other female characters yet her presence is key to the death of Desdemona as well as other play themes. Iago often refers to her as a prostitute, "A house wife that by selling her desires, Buys herself bread and clothes". She has fallen in love with Cassio, yet he does not speak of his returned affection for her due to his desire for status, and her social standing would affect this dramatically. She is the jealous partner in this relationship and expresses this when Cassio produces Desdemona's handkerchief, which Iago has planted in Cassio's room. Iago uses Bianca's name to cause the great perplexity in the play, which eventually leads to the horrific ending. While Othello hid, listening to the conversation between Iago and Cassio he remained convinced that it was Desdemona that Cassio spoke of. Iago has no respect for her when he also blames the fight between Iago and Roderigo on Bianca's "Whoring" As Iago's wife and Desdemona's lady in waiting Emilia helps link Iago's plan. It was she whom supplied the Desdemona's handkerchief for Iago. This helps Iago distort Othello's views about Desdemona's fidelity. It is interesting that she does not question Iago too much when she gives him the handkerchief, it could be considered that this illustrates female ability to trust in the play.......

Words: 827 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

How Does Ian Mcewan Present Briony in Part One of Atonement?

...How does Ian McEwan convey Briony in Part One of Atonement? At first glance, Ian McEwan presents Briony Tallis as an innocent child who simply witnessed scenes she did not understand, however what we can actually see, as the novel progresses, is that Briony is an attention seeking, self-absorbed, meddling child whose series of incorrect observations come to wreck Cecilia and Robbie’s lives. We are introduced to Briony Tallis at the very start of the novel, when she is preparing for cousins from the North to arrive and her older brother Leon and his friend Paul Marshall’s return, so that she can perform her play ‘The Trials of Arabella’. From this we can note that Briony is an imaginative child but we also learn that she is attention seeking because she had also designed “posters, programmes and tickets’ after learning the news that her cousins would be visiting, rather than welcoming ‘Leon with another one of her stories’, this show us that Briony wants to impress her family and show that she is more than just a child. We can see that Briony is quite intelligent as she managed to write a play that ‘intended to inspire not laughter, but terror, relief, and instruction’ which for a child aged 13 is impressive. The reason the narrator, who we later discover is Briony, included that information about the play was because it was foreshadowing the events that followed Briony’s life. Briony would witness and inflict ‘Terror’ by misobserving Robbie and Cecilia’s actions, which......

Words: 1682 - Pages: 7

Premium Essay

How Does Steinbeck Present Dreams in of Mice and Men

...sort of thing was going on. Many of his books protested against the American Dream, explicitly illustrating how much disruption and deception it causes. The Grapes of Wrath is essentially a tragedy and it is a microcosm for the suffering of many people at that time. Another Great Depression themed book of Steinbeck’s is Of Mice and Men. It tells the story of George (a quick thinking, short man) and Lennie (a huge man who is mentally handicapped), a pair of Dust Bowl drifting workers who share remarkable friendship. Both men have a dream of one day “working up a stake” and owning a farm together. They find work at a nearby ranch and here, they meet a group of men who work on the ranch. Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men is a novel where all “American Dreams” are shattered. This displays Steinbeck’s thought of how unachievable and unreachable the American Dream actually is. Even the title of the novella gives this away: Robert Burns’ poem, To a Mouse, tells of how he upturned a mouse's nest whilst ploughing a field. The poem is an apology to the mouse. In one of the verses, Burns writes: “The best laid schemes o' mice an' men Gang aft a-gley, [often go awry] 
An' lea'e us nought but grief an' pain, for promised joy.” He is expressing how even the most carefully laid plans can go wrong, and cause ‘grief and pain’ for what was to come out of those plans. It is coherent to see how this ties in with the novella, since many of the dreams and plans of the characters do not become......

Words: 3641 - Pages: 15

Premium Essay

how does harper lee present prejudices in the novel to kill a mockingbird

...How does Harper Lee present the theme of Prejudice in the novel? ‘To Kill a Mockingbird.’? In the novel ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ Harper Lee presents the theme of prejudice in a number of different ways. She shows that prejudice is present throughout all levels of society in Maycomb. She directs her attention to groups and individuals. ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ was set in the mid 1930’s and although slavery was abolished by the North in 1865 throughout America, the South still treated blacks as inferior, as the slaves they once were and the residents of Maycomb County typify this. The main theme of prejudice in this book is that of racial prejudice. The whole trial of Tom Robinson is full of prejudice against him. Before the trial even commences Reverend Sykes invites the children to sit in the coloured balcony – (Pg 181). Even the black and white public must sit separately! Extreme racial prejudice is shown to us by Harper Lee when she tells us of the colour segregation. In Maycomb there is segregation between black and white people. This is emphasised by the way blacks file in last and are seated in the balcony. Their politeness to the children is shown when four black people give up their front row seats for them. This shows white children also have authority over black adults. It is ironic that the children will have the same viewpoint as the black people attending the trial – in terms of where they see it from. At the time black people could not show their......

Words: 1791 - Pages: 8

Premium Essay

How Does Priestley Present Mr Birling

...In an inspector calls Priestley presents Mr Birling as being a successful business man who is ruthless. He is also very proud and boasts lots to make him have more social authority. Another reason is that Priestley is very optimistic. Moreover he is very selfish and only cares about himself and his family. Mr Birling comes across as being a successful business man who is ruthless. For example he plays golf with Chief Constable Colonel Roberts, golf is a luxury and is very expensive, he also plays with Colonel Roberts who is rich and Birling would only like to be seen with Rich high social class people “we play golf together sometimes up at the West Brumley” This shows that he is most likely a member of the club and would only be able to afford it if he is rich. We know he is ruthless because he fired Eva smith and a group of workers only because they wanted two and a half more shillings. This is a very small amount and he says himself “cheaper costs and higher prices” if he should get more for less then why can’t the workers get more for less. He is also presented as being very proud and boastful. For example he shows off to Gerald about the port “this is the same port your father has” this shows that he wants Gerald to think he is as important as his father as to the public Gerald’s fathers company is better and Mr Birling wants to be like Gerald’s father. Another example of him being boastful is when he boast about how he was “lord mayor two years ago when Royalty......

Words: 606 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

How Does the Character of Mr. Birling Reflect British Society in 1912?

...How does the character of Mr. Birling reflect British society in 1912? The character of Mr. Birling is very important in 'An inspector calls' because he reflects how many upper class people (especially men) treated others in different classes. His character is vital to get across Priestley's socialist ideologies. Firstly, Mr. Birling exclaims how he is not "a purple-faced old man.", this suggests that most men of authority were greedy, only cared for themselves and had a lot of money to waste on things like excessive food. Secondly, we can see that Sheila and Gerald's engagement "means a tremendous lot to [Birling].", this is very similar to the society at that time as many people used others for their own personal gain. The engagement will help the Birling's business by raising their social class. Next, during this time period sexism towards woman was just every day life. Mr. Birling asks "Are you listening Sheila?", this reflects sexism within society as most men felt women weren't as intelligent as them so had to be spoken to in a simpler manner. Birling thinks it's "a very good time," for the engagement. This is an excellent example of dramatic irony as in 2 years time World War one was to begin. In 1912 people with authority were blind to the devastation that was to come, as was Mr. Birling. The character of Mr. Birling is an excellent illustration of ignorant upper class citizens in 1912. "We've past the worst of it." highlights that most......

Words: 755 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

How Does Alice Walker Present Ideas of Love and Marriage in 'the Color Purple'

...Alice Walker presents her ideas of love and marriage through the character in ‘The Color Purple’ and their relationships. Each character’s perception of love and marriage differs in the prime of the novel, yet as we progress and witness the trials and tribulations they endure, we see their ideas distort and reshape, or strengthen. Throughout the novel we are given a mixed bag of types of relationships, some are love-starved, others are brimming with love and some are only short bursts of love. From the early chapters of the novel we are given the fundamentals of the generic relationship back then; dominant male and submissive female (there is also the exception of Shug and Celie, even then it seems that Shug is more dominant than Celie). Most marriages throughout the novel aren’t particularly joyous; we rarely saw any love and most, and even when we do, violence is used to control their other-half’s behaviour. There are a few stable relationships that prevail, for example Nettie and the Reverend. With the different marriages that we encounter I believe that Walker is implying that marriage wasn’t so much to do with how much you loved the other person, but much to do with how much you could grow while being with the other person, or how much labour one would have to do while with their spouse. One message I feel that Walker is trying to depict is that marriage was just an institution that does not do much other than give men and excuse to control women. Another is that......

Words: 1025 - Pages: 5

Free Essay

How Does Cormier Present the Character Nicole in Heroes?

...How does Cormier present the character Nicole in Heroes?- In this essay I will be talking about how the character, Nicole, is portrayed in Cormier’s novel; Heroes. This will include mentioning the events that Nicole has been through, how they have affected her as a person throughout her life in the novel and if they determine if she is a hero or not. Nicole is first mentioned in the novel by Francis whilst he is on his own in church, ‘I pray of course for Nicole Renard’. Francis is speaking to us as reader in first person, telling us without any background information on the 4th page of the novel the name of a girl who is the person he would ‘of course’ pray for. This shows that Nicole is of significance to the character and to the rest of the novel, we assume as his mentioning of her was so brief but exact that she will be expanded on more. ‘It will always be Nicole Renard’ as she is mentioned again it assures the reader that she will definitely be included more. The structure of the name drop raises interests and we become intrigued, Cormier is wanting us to make assumptions about her. The second paragraph starts with ‘I saw Nicole Renard for the first time in seventh grade’. It’s an instant impact to the reader similar to the effect we assume Nicole had on Francis. The suddenness of the statement shows there was an automatic spark for Francis as he still remembers the exact time they had their first encounter. ‘followed by the most beautiful girl I had ever seen’......

Words: 1498 - Pages: 6

Free Essay

Act 1: - How Does Priestley Create a Sense of Unease and Suggest That Mr Birling’s Optimism Is Unfounded?

...Act 1: - How does Priestley create a sense of unease and suggest that Mr Birling’s optimism is unfounded? As Act 1 of An Inspector Calls continues we see that Arthur Birling seems to be a confident and powerful man who is clearly anxious to be seen as a successful businessman and the head of his family. He is apparently very pleased with the way life is turning out for him and the other Birlings. Priestley sets the play in 1912 but it was first performed in 1945. He quite deliberately proceeds to make Mr Birling speak, in these first scenes of An Inspector Calls of events which the audience would know all about. A lot of what he dismisses as ‘wild talk’ and ‘nonsense’ actually happened. This gives Birling the appearance of foolishness and over-confidence as well as creating a sense of unease as the reader loses confidence and trust in Birling’s word. The writer has used dramatic irony to make Birling’s current position look very unstable. The first example of this is when he talks about the chance of further labour strikes. He states that “just because the miners came on strike, there’s a lot of wild talk about possible labour trouble in the near future. Don’t worry. We’ve passed the worst of it.” However there were many strikes in between 1912 and 1945 including the general strike in 1926. As this strike resulted in the country coming to a halt for nine days the fact that Birling is so complacent about this matter shows the audience how overconfident and......

Words: 808 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

How Does Keats Present Love in His Poems?

...How does Keats present love in his poems? John Keats was born 1795, in London and was often claimed as one of the most important Romantic figures of the nineteenth century. He had many struggles in his life from his mother and brother dying from tuberculosis, to his poetry being constantly rejected and him running out of money. A lot of Keats’s themes were Romantic, such as the beauty of nature, the contrast of fantasy and reality and the relation of beauty to suffering. Though initially all Keats’s poems that present love seems to be portrayed contrastingly, really they’re actually revealed to be quite similar. Through numerous techniques, from the exploration of senses, to form to the different symbols and styles that Keats’s used to intertwining themes used to express the theme of love. However through all of Keats’s poems, he shares a sense of sacrifice and pain that deal with his idea of the eternal and fantasy world and how in exchange for immortality the lovers have to give up their human experiences and intimacy. In the ninth line of ‘Bright Star’ Keats reveals his desire to remain in the moment “Pillow’d upon [his] fair love’s ripening breast”. However in order to remain in this moment Keats has to sacrifice all his humans’ experiences to be immortal. In the final line of ‘Bright Star’ Keats writes “And so live ever—or else swoon to death”. Many have considered ‘Swoon’ to be an little death or an orgasm as towards the end of the poem the pace and rhythm increases...

Words: 1854 - Pages: 8

Premium Essay

How Does George Eliot Present Money and Wealth in Silas Marner?

...How does George Eliot present money and wealth in Silas Marner? George Eliot presents money and wealth in Silas Marner as something which is a prized possession and as if there is nothing better. There are many situations throughout the novel where this is revealed. However closer to the end of the novel there comes a turning point on the point about wealth and money when they realise it’s not all about money. One of the ways George shows the importance of money is when he says “And [he] had lost his money too, so as he had nothing but what he worked for week by week, and when the weaving was going down too—for there was less and less flax spun—and Master Marner was none so young.” This quote is an example of George Eliot's historical precision. That throw-away line, "there was less and less flax spun," keys into a big historical change: the Industrial Revolution, which is basically outsourcing Silas's job. In the cities, factories are churning out cheap fabric that makes his loom irrelevant. Another point about wealth mentioned in the novel is when they are trying to get Eppie (Godfrey’s child) but in this case it is not an obsession of wealth at hand or its importance. “It's natural he should be disappointed at not having any children: every man likes to have somebody to work for and lay by for, and he always counted so on making a fuss with 'em when they were little.” From this we can understand Nancy excuses Godfrey's disappointment in not having children because,......

Words: 596 - Pages: 3

Free Essay

How Does Robert Browning and Shakespeare Present Jealousy in the Laboratory and Othello

...English essay: How does Browning and Shakespeare present jealousy in the poem 'the laboratory' and 'Othello' Jealousy is described as someone who is showing envy usually of someone because of their achievements or advantages, jealousy plays a major role in both Othello and the laboratory. throughout the both of them jealousy is used for destructive purposes only. as an audience we are led to feel that both jealousies are motivated not by hatred but by the passion for one another, crazy as that may seem. Shakespeare uses jealousy as a central theme throughout the play, without this aggressive and destructive emotion, there would be no solid plot. Shakespeare often refers to jealousy as a devouring emotion "Beware, my lord of jealousy! it is the green eyed monster which doth mock, the meat it feeds on" this fits extremely well with Iago's description of Othello being "beaten up with passion". This suggests exactly how strong Othello's monumental jealousy really is, once Othello becomes aware that his wife is unfaithful, Iago continues to feed his jealousy which causes Othello to indeed behave like a monster. however, its dramatic irony that Iago says this to Othello. the audience knows that Iago is perhaps the one "eaten up" with jealousy and Othello is none the wiser he holds; the form of personal and professional jealousy. The jealousy that is portrayed in 'Othello' is very similar to the one portrayed in Browning's poem The Laboratory, it explores the theme of......

Words: 641 - Pages: 3

Free Essay

How Does Priestley Present Mr Birling Priestley Presents the Character of Mr Birling as a Symbol of the Capitalist Ruling Class and the Need for Socialist Ideals.

...How Does Priestley Present Mr Birling Priestley presents the character of Mr Birling as a symbol of the capitalist ruling class and the need for socialist ideals. Priestley begins by presenting Mr Birling as a successful, albeit 'hard-headed businessman'. It is clear from the stage directions which describe 'The dining room... of a fairly large suburban house, belonging to a prosperous manufacturer' that Birling is rich and materialistically successful. In terms of capitalism, he is therefore a role model in the fact that he has reached the capitalist goals of making a financial profit. Once Birling's worldy success is established, Priestley undermines his character through presenting Mr Birling as ignorant. With the play being set before WW2, dramatic irony is used when Birling exclaims 'there isn't chance of war'. Here the audience know he is wrong, and therefore realise that Birling's confidence is misguided- he is an ignorant man. This is further proven when he claims that the soon to sail Titanic is 'absolutely unsinkable'.The audience may feel there is a contradiction in this character - worldly success and power coupled with stupidity and ignorance. However, Priestley has deliberately presented Birling in this way to criticise the capitalism for which Birling stands. Being a co-founder of the Socialist Commonwealth Party, Priestley felt that his political views on socialism were very important and the play 'An Inspector Calls' is his vehicle from which to promote......

Words: 3037 - Pages: 13

Premium Essay

An Inspector Calls - Mr Birling

...J.B. Priestly presents Arthur Birling as a self-obsessed, work oriented “hard-headed business man” in Act 1. The stage directions describe him as a “heavy-looking, rather portentous man” giving an impression that he looks rather threatening. He is very traditional and speaks formally, even around his family. He has worked hard to raise himself up the social ladder and is proud to think that he’s going to be knighted. Even at his daughter’s engagement party, Birling’s head is still wrapped around business and this is evidently shown when he says “Your father and I have been friendly rivals in business for some time now.... and now you’ve brought us together, and perhaps we may look forward to the time when Crofts and Birlings are no longer competing….” He also states that the party is “one of the happiest nights of my life” but this could have a double meaning for not only is Sheila getting married, but it can be seen as a business opportunity. These quotes show that Birling is very work oriented and uses Sheila’s marriage for his own selfish reasons. As well as being selfish, Birling is rather overconfident in his opinions. His mistaken view of the “unsinkable Titanic” is an example of dramatic irony. This is ironic as the Titanic actually sank but only the audience is aware of this. Another example of the use of dramatic irony is when Birling says “The Germans don’t want war. Nobody wants war….. I say there isn’t a chance of war” This is also ironic as two years after......

Words: 437 - Pages: 2

Free Essay

How Do You Respond to This Extract and How Does Priestley Make You Respond as You Do by the Ways He Writes? (30 Marks)

...How do you respond to this extract and how does Priestley make you respond as you do by the ways he writes? (30 marks) Birling: (jovially) But the whole thing's different now. Come, come, you can see that, can't you? (Imitating Inspector in his final speech.) You all helped to kill her. (pointing at Sheila and Eric, and laughing.) and I wish you could have seen the look on your faces when he said that. // Sheila moves towards door.// Going to bed, young woman? Sheila: (tensely) I want to get out of this. It frightens me the way you talk.  Birling: (heartily) Nonsense! You'll have a good laugh over it yet. Look, you'd better ask Gerald for that ring you gave back to him, hadn't you? Then you'll feel better. Sheila: (passionately) You're pretending everything's just as it was before. Eric: I'm not! Sheila: No, but these others are. Birling: Well, isn't it? We've been had, that's all. Sheila: So nothing really happened. So there's nothing to be sorry for, nothing to learn. We can all go on behaving just as we did. Mrs Birling: Well, why shouldn't we? Sheila: I tell you – whoever that Inspector was, it was anything but a joke. You knew it then. You began to learn something. And now you've stopped. You're ready to go on in the same old way.  Birling: (amused) And you're not, eh? Sheila: No, because I remember what he said, how he looked, and what he made me feel. Fire and blood and anguish. And it frightens me the way you talk, and I can't listen to any more of......

Words: 728 - Pages: 3