Free Essay

Green Banking

In: Business and Management

Submitted By Siraj369
Words 12235
Pages 49
Page | 1
SUSTAINABILITY REPORT UNDER GREEN BANKING INITIATIVES OF TRUST BANK LIMITED Introductory Note
The publication of the first Sustainability Report of Trust Bank Limited (TBL) represents its continued commitment to publish information on sustainability matters every year. The Sustainability Report consists of only the GRI technical section to meet the requirements of the Global Reporting
Initiative.

The scope of the information provided in this report basically covers the activities of Trust Bank Limited in Bangladesh. This report was prepared to make adherence to an application level of the Global Reporting Initiative and is unconfirmed by external assurances.
For more information about sustainability at Trust Bank Limited please go to www.trustbanklimited.com. 01. STRATEGY AND ANALYSIS 1.1 CHAIRMAN’S STATEMENT
Please see the statement from the Chairman of Trust Bank Limited’s Board of Directors published at the beginning of the
Annual Report 2011. 1.2 KEY IMPACTS, RISKS AND OPPORTUNITIES
The impacts of the activity of Trust Bank Limited come essentially from three factors:
 Its importance as a reference institution in the Bangladesh financial sector;
 Its position as a substantial participant in the Bangladesh market;
 The importance of the financial sector to balanced economic growth and the contribution that this growth can make to incorporating sustainability more in the economy in general. Therefore, considering the specificity of the financial business, there are a number of positive caused by TBL’s activity, namely:  Sustainable economic development;
 Stepping up the competitiveness, capacity for innovation and globalization of Bangladeshi companies;
 The stability and solidity of the financial system;
 Job creation;
 Development of local communities;
 Social responsibility;
 Promotion of responsible consumption by means of products encouraging this;
 Promotion of renewable energies by offering products fostering their use;
 Encouragement of sustainable development at schools and banks and in society as a whole through promoting
School Banking;
 A reduction in the environmental impact in general and climate change in particular as, although this is not a specific aspect of the financial sector, it is an issue in which TBL wishes to play an active role. After identifying the positive impacts and the inevitable negative ones of TBL’s activity have been identified (e.g. the use of natural resources linked with our activity, the production of effluent and waste), it is possible for us to understand the risks and opportunities brought to our business by sustainability. The main risks we face are:
 Living up to the expectations of the market and society;
 Risk of fraud and money laundering; Page | 2
 Anticipating financial risks arising from our customers’ environmental factors;
 Customers’ perceived satisfaction with the quality of our service. Opportunities:
Creating financial products that promote: o the development of companies operating in the environmental sector; o social and financial inclusion; Page | 3
02. ORGANISATIONAL PROFILE 2.1 NAME OF THE ORGANISATION
Trust Bank Limited also referred to as TBL throughout this document. 2.2 PRIMARY BRANDS, PRODUCTS AND/OR SERVICES
TBL is one of the larger financial intermediaries in Bangladesh. It also has a 100% owned subsidiary, namely Trust Bank
Investment Limited, which covers the capital market through merchant banking services. Within the group, TBL is the main company and accounts for 93.12% of its credit product. TBL’s branches, SME Centre’s and SME/Krishi Branches offer a vast range of products for private and corporate customers. Retail Customers SME Corporate Customers Islamic Banking
Car Loan Scheme (CLS) Small Loan Cash Credit (Hypo) Bai-Muajjal
Cash Collateral
(FDR/SP/WEDB)
Women Entrepreneur Loan Cash Credit (Pledge) Hire Purchase under
Shirkatul Melk
Consumer Durable Scheme
(CDS)
Entrepreneurship
Development Loan for
Retirees
Export Cash Credit IHSAN Apartment
Purchase Scheme
House Building Loan
(Residential)
Loan for Shopkeepers House Building Loan
(Mortgage)
BARAKAT Home
Construction Scheme
HBL against Commutation
Benefit
Agri Business Loan House Building Loan
(Commercial)
BARAKAT Car Scheme
Loan agt. Cash Collateral Loan for Poultry Farm Loan agt. Imported
Merchandise (LIM)
HPSM-Real Estate
Marriage Loan Scheme (MLS) Loan for Light Engineering Loan agt. Trust Receipt (LTR) Murabaha TR
Micro Credit (Reconst &
Repairing of Dwelling)
Peak Seasons Loan Overdraft (OD) Bai-Salam
Overdraft A/C (OD) - ATM Card Overdraft / Cash Credit - SME Overdraft (Working Capital) Murabaha, Import Bills
(MIB)
Credit Card - Local Overdraft / Cash Credit -
Women Entrepreneur
Packing Credit (Loan agt.
Packing Credit)
TIB House Building
Scheme-HBL (RM)
Credit Card - International SME - Time Loan Payment agt. Documents
(PAD)
TIB Doctors Scheme-
(Doctors Loan)
Trust Money Making Scheme
(TMMS) Loan
SME - Term Loan SOD (Industrial) TIB Car Scheme (Car
Loan)
Car Loan agt. New Car Trust Bunon -OD SOD (Secured Overdraft) -
General
TIB Household Durable
Scheme ( Household
Durable)
Car Loan agt. Recond. Car Trust Bunon -Term loan Term Loan (Commercial) TIB CNG Scheme (CNG
Conversion Loan)
Household Durables Loan Trust Shufola Bio gas Term Loan (General) TIB AOHS (AOHS)
Doctor's Loan Shufola Solar Energy Term Loan (Industrial) FDBP – TIB
Loan Against Salary Shoufola Fisheries Time Loan Musharaka agt. IBP
Any Purpose Loan Shoufola poultry &Livestock Loan Others
Hospitalization Loan Shoufola Agro processing Car Loan - Corp. (Bus, Truck)
Education Loan Agriculture Loan Syndication facilities
Travel Loan
Marriage Loan - Other than
Amry
Page | 4
Any Purpose Loan - Defense
Off.

Education Loan - Defense Off.
Doctor's Loan - Defense Off.
CNG Conversion - Defense Off.
Consumer Durable Scheme
(3M)

CNG Conversion Loan
Apon Nibash (House Finance)
Car Loan - Defence Off.
Household Durable - Defence
Off.

RRDH 3M
HBL- Refinancing Facility of BB
Marriage Loan Scheme (MLS) for other ranks Army Officers Housing Scheme
Loan

MOTOR CYCLE LOAN for defense officers Trust Thikana
Trust Digital Loan
Personal Loan (PL)
Trust Ekota
1st Class Police Officers
Housing Loan Scheme TBL has a Bank distribution network that covers the whole country and commercial facilities in most of the districts. Note: More detail on products and services can be found at www.trustbanklimited.com. 2.3 OPERATIONAL STRUCTURE OF TBL, INCLUDING MAIN DIVISIONS, OPERATING COMPANIES, SUBSIDIARIES
AND JOINT VENTURES
The scope of the information in this report essentially covers the activities of Trust Bank Limited in Bangladesh. The figure below shows the TBL’s operating structure in terms of geographical location and business area. TBL’s operating (ownership) structure as at 31 December 2011
Trust Bank Limited Shareholding Percentage
Commercial Banking Sponsors/ Directors 60.00%
Financial Institutions 15.50%
Investors A/C 5.63%
Foreign Investors 0.09%
Non Resident Bangladeshis 0.47%
General Public 18.31%
Merchant Banking
(Trust Bank Investment Limited)
Trust Bank Limited 100.00% 2.4 LOCATION OF ORGANISATION’S HEADQUARTERS
TBL’s registered office is at 98 Shaheed Sharani, Dhaka Cantonment, Dhaka and Peoples Insurance Bhaban, 36
Dilkusha C/A, Dhaka. Page | 5
2.5 NUMBER OF COUNTRIES WHERE THE ORGANISATION OPERATES AND NAMES OF COUNTRIES WITH
EITHER MAJOR OPERATIONS OR THAT ARE SPECIFICALLY RELEVANT TO THE SUSTAINABILITY ISSUES
COVERED IN THE REPORT
At the end of 2011, TBL’s commercial network had 69 branches in Bangladesh, 9 more than in the previous year, as shown in the table below. Commercial network of Trust Bank Limited in Bangladesh Dhaka Chittagong Sylhet Rajshahi Barisal Khulna Rangpur
BRANCHES 28 18 6 4 1 3 2
SME/KRISHI BRANCHES 4 - 1 2 - - - Year wise branch operating area expansion:
Year Branch
Opened
Branch Name Geographical Locations Covered
1999 5 Principal, Comilla Cantonment, Sena Kalyan Bhaban,
Bogra Cantonment, Chittagong Cantonment.
Dhaka, Comilla, Bogra, Chittagong
2000 3 Momenshahi Cantonment, Jessore Cantonment, Rangpur
Cantonment
Mymensingh, Jessore, Rangpur
2001 2 Savar Cantonment, Jalalabad Cantonment Dhaka, Sylhet
2002 1 Agrabad Chittagong
2003 2 Dhanmondi, S.S. Cantonment. Dhaka, Tangail
2004 2 Khatungonj, Gulshan. Dhaka, Chittagong
2005 3 Dilkusha, KYAMCH, Radisson Water Garden Hotel. Dhaka, Shirajgonj
2006 8 CDA Avenue, Halishahar, Beani Bazar, Goala Bazar,
Millennium, Uttara, Moulvi Bazar, Sylhet.
Chittagong, Sylhet, Dhaka, Moulavi
Bazar
2007 5 Naval Base, Mirpur, Joypara, Karwan Bazar, Feni. Chittagong, Dhaka, Feni
2008 6 Jubilee Road, Narayangonj, Ashugonj, Narsingdi,
Joydevpur, Shahjalal Uposhahor.
Chittagong, Narayangonj, Sylhet,
Brahamanbaria, Narsingdi, Gazipur.
2009 9 Chowmuhani, Dholaikhal, Kafrul, Mirerbazar, Khulna,
Madhabdi, Amirabad Lohagara, Tamai, Tongi.
Noakhali, Dhaka, Gazipur, Khulna,
Narsingdi, Chittagong, Sirajgonj,
Gazipur
2010 13 Barisal, Rajshahi, Kadamtali, Ashulia, Comilla, Rajendrapur
Cantonment, Cox’s Bazar, Manikgonj, Rangamati, Natore,
Progati Sarani, Kazirbazar, Elephant Road.
Barisal, Rajshahi, Chittagong, Dhaka,
Comilla, Gajipur, Cox’s Bazar,
Manikgonj, Rangamati, Natore,
Sylhet.
2011 10 Bandarban, Gopalganj, Khagrachari, Kishorganj, Khawja
Gariba Newaz Avenue, Mongla, Banani, Dayarampur,
Faridpur, Saidpur.
Bandarban, Gopalganj, Khagrachari,
Kishorganj, Dhaka, Bagerhat,
Natore, Fridpur, Saidpur 2.6 NATURE OF OWNERSHIP AND LEGAL FORM
The company was incorporated on 17 June 1999 under the Companies Act 1994 as a public company limited by shares for carrying out all kinds of banking activities. Shareholding structure is given in 2.4. 2.7 MARKETS SERVED (INCLUDING GEOGRAPHIC BREAKDOWN, SECTORS SERVED AND TYPES OF
CUSTOMERS / BENEFICIARIES)
Please see point 2.5. 2.8 SCALE OF THE REPORTING ORGANISATION
The table below provides information illustrating the scale of TBL’s activity. Main figures on activity of Trust Bank Limited in 2011 Page | 6 Millions of BDT in 2010 Millions of BDT in 2011 Change 2011/2010
Banking Revenue 3643.05 3060.47 0.84
Net Profit 1274.78 616.21 0.48
Distribution of Dividend 369.60 443.52 1.20
Loans Disbursed 43,478.30 49,793.70 1.14
Deposits 50,357.90 65,263.70 1.30 No. of Employees in 2010 No. of Employees in 2011 Change 2011/2010
Employees in Bangladesh 1041 1175 1.13 2.9 SIGNIFICANT CHANGES DURING THE REPORTING PERIOD REGARDING SIZE, STRUCTURE OR OWNERSHIP
In 2011, the Board of Directors approved 20% bonus shares resulting in share capital increase of BDT 443.52 million ascending the capital to BDT 2661.13 million. TBL opened 10 new branches in 2011. 2.10 AWARDS RECEIVED BY TBL IN 2011
TBL did not receive any awards in 2011. Page | 7
03. REPORT PARAMETERS
3.1 REPORTING PERIOD FOR INFORMATION PROVIDED
Calendar year - 2011. 3.2 DATE OF MOST RECENT PREVIOUS REPORT
This is the first sustainability report under Green Banking initiatives. 3.3 REPORTING CYCLE
TBL publishes sustainability reports on an annual basis. 3.4 CONTACT POINT FOR QUESTIONS REGARDING THE REPORT OR ITS CONTENT
For further information on the 2011 Sustainability Report 2011 please contact Trust Bank Limited, Green Banking Unit,
Head Office, Peoples Insurance Bhaban, 36 Dilkusha C/A, 16th Floor, Dhaka-1000. 3.5 PROCESS FOR DEFINING REPORT CONTENT
This Sustainability Report is based on the GRI principles:
 Relevance - The GRI method was used to identify material issues to be reported based on the findings of Green
Banking Unit.
 Clarity and inclusion of stakeholders - We identified strategic stakeholders and the way in which their questions were answered and expectations met. We have explained the process used in identifying strategic stakeholders and the action taken and planned to strengthen relations with them. The 2011 CGD Sustainability Report has been divided into two separate sections in order to meet the information needs of different readers. The
Institutional Section is for ordinary readers, while the GRI Technical Section is for readers more interested in technical details.
 Context of sustainability - The 2011 TBL Sustainability Report contains information on the main trends and challenges in the area. TBL’s sustainability performance is described throughout the report.
 Balance - The report addresses positive and negative aspects of CGD’s sustainability performance. The less positive aspects are confronted and described as challenges and opportunities for improvement.
 Comparability - The purpose of the information is to enable readers to assess TBL’s performance in the last two years. The figures for 2011 have been calculated in accordance with the GRI for the period so that they can be compared with other companies’ performance.
 Accuracy and reliability - All the information reported is accurate and reliable. Methodological notes are added whenever estimates are made. External assurances would be completed in the subsequent sustainability reports as per regulatory requirements.
 Scope - This report contains information about all the relevant activities of TBL. in a sustainability context.
The information reported relates to all relevant activities undertaken by TBL only not including its subsidiary. 3.6 BOUNDARY OF THE REPORT
The report covers the activity of Trust Bank Limited in Bangladesh. These operations represent:
 93.12% of the TBL’s consolidated credit product portfolio;
 66.02% of its net profit;
 96.68% of its employees. 3.7 STATE ANY SPECIFIC LIMITATIONS ON THE SCOPE AND BOUNDARY OF THE REPORT
All limitations on the scope and boundary of the report are mentioned next to each indicator, if applicable. 3.8 BASIS FOR REPORTING ON JOINT VENTURES, SUBSIDIARIES, LEASED FACILITIES, OUTSOURCED
OPERATIONS, AND OTHER ENTITIES THAT CAN SIGNIFICANTLY AFFECT COMPARABILITY FROM PERIOD TO
PERIOD AND/OR BETWEEN ORGANISATIONS
When drafting the report, the activity of Trust Bank Investment Limited and its local branches, were not considered. Page | 8
3.9 DATA MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES AND THE BASES OF CALCULATIONS, INCLUDING ASSUMPTIONS AND
TECHNIQUES UNDERLYING ESTIMATIONS APPLIED TO THE COMPILATION OF THE INDICATORS AND OTHER
INFORMATION IN THE REPORT
All the methodological notes required for a proper understanding of the information reported and changes in calculation methods are mentioned next to the indicators to which they refer. 3.10 EXPLANATION OF THE EFFECT OF ANY RE-STATEMENTS OF INFORMATION IN PREVIOUS REPORTS AND
THE REASONS FOR SUCH RE-STATEMENT (E.G. MERGERS/ACQUISITIONS, CHANGE OF BASE
YEARS/PERIODS, NATURE OF BUSINESS, MEASUREMENT METHODS)
This is the first sustainability report. 3.11 SIGNIFICANT CHANGES FROM PREVIOUS REPORTING PERIODS IN THE SCOPE, BOUNDARY OR
MEASUREMENT METHODS APPLIED IN THE REPORT
This is the first sustainability report. 3.12 TABLE IDENTIFYING THE LOCATION OF THE STANDARD DISCLOSURES IN THE REPORT
The Sustainability Report responds to all the standard disclosures. 3.13 POLICY AND CURRENT PRACTICE WITH REGARD TO SEEKING EXTERNAL ASSURANCE FOR THE REPORT
The GRI Technical Section abides by level A of GRI G3 guidelines. However, assurance from external auditor would be completed as per regulatory guidelines of Bangladesh Bank as necessary.

Page | 9
04. GOVERNANCE, COMMITMENTS AND STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT 4.1 TBL’S GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE, INCLUDING COMMITTEES UNDER THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS RESPON-
SIBLE FOR SPECIFIC TASKS, SUCH AS SETTING STRATEGY OR ORGANISATIONAL OVERSIGHT The Board of Directors:
The Board of Directors is the supreme authority in the Bank’s affairs between shareholders’ meetings. The Board at TBL is committed to the Bank seeking to achieve superior financial performance and long-term prosperity, while meeting stakeholders’ expectations of sound corporate governance.
It handles the Bank’s affairs and ensures that its organization and operation are at all times in correct and appropriate order. The Board is, among other things, responsible for setting business objectives, strategies and business plans, formulating risk policies, confirming key aspects of the Bank’s internal organization and making decisions on the establishment of branches. As a mechanism of budgetary control, the Board approves budget and reviews the business plan on quarterly basis so as to give directions as per changing economic and market environment. The Board also reviews the policies and guidelines issued by Bangladesh Bank and gives directions for their due compliance.
Furthermore, Board of Directors develops and reviews corporate governance framework as well as recommends to shareholders to appoint an external auditor.
Composition
The Board of Trust Bank Limited consists of nine members including Managing Director as executive director and ex- officio member of the Board. As per the guideline of Bangladesh Bank and as well as in compliance with the Securities and Exchange Commission’s corporate governance guideline, the Board consists one Depositor Director who is also
Independent Director.
Executive Committee
As approved by Bangladesh Bank, the Board has Executive Committee. The committee comprises five members from the
Board. The Executive Committee mainly scrutinizes the proposals sent to Board of Directors for decision. However, in order to have functioning and quick disposal of credit proposals, Board has delegated authority to Executive Committee of the Board to approve proposal within certain limit and it is observed to be effective to accelerate the various decisions which otherwise had to wait for Board meeting.
Audit Committee
The Audit Committee maintains regular contact with both external and internal auditors and ensures that complaints and observations from the auditors are acted upon. Furthermore, the Audit Committee discusses accounting principles and changes thereto. The Audit Committee consults and advises the Board on the scope of internal audits. The committee keeps under review the scope and results of the audit and its cost-effectiveness and the independence and objectivity of the auditors. The committee ensures transparency and accountability in the operations of the Bank and the activities of the Bank are conducted within framework of policies, principles and plans as laid down by the Board, and the guidelines of the regulatory authorities issued from time to time.
The necessity of the Audit Committee is further strengthened by BRPD Circular No. 12 dated 23.12.2003. The committee is headed by a senior Director and comprises two other Directors including one Independent Director. However, the company secretary is the secretary of Audit Committee. The committee has unrestricted access to all accounts, books and records to ensure the job is conducted properly. 4.2 INDICATE WHETHER THE CHAIR OF TBL’S BOARD OF DIRECTORS IS ALSO AN EXECUTIVE OFFICER (AND,
IF SO, THEIR FUNCTION WITHIN THE ORGANISATION’S MANAGEMENT AND THE REASONS FOR THIS
ARRANGEMENT)
TBL’s corporate bodies are: Page | 10
1. The Executive Committee; and
2. The Audit Committee. 4.3 NUMBER OF TBL DIRECTORS THAT ARE INDEPENDENT AND/OR NON-EXECUTIVE MEMBERS
At present the total number of Directors is 8 in the Board of Directors of the Bank where 3 of them are Nominated
Directors (Nominated by Army Welfare Trust), one is Independent & Depositor Director and rest is Director from general shareholder. The Board of Trust Bank Limited consists of nine members including Managing Director as executive director. Other than Managing Director and Independent Director, all of them are Non-executive Directors. 4.4 MECHANISMS FOR THE SHAREHOLDER AND EMPLOYEES TO PROVIDE RECOMMENDATIONS OR
DIRECTION TO TBL’S BOARD OF DIRECTORS
The Bank acknowledges and takes necessary steps to provide shareholders with all relevant and reliable information to allow them to make informed judgment and decisions. All relevant information is placed in website of the Bank for convenience of the shareholders. Moreover, as per SEC guidelines all the price sensitive information having possible impact on share prices of the Bank are communicated to the shareholders by publication in the national dailies and to the
DSE, CSE, and SEC through official letters for appearance in their website. Quarterly Financial Statements are communicated to all the shareholders through DSE, CSE and SEC. Half-yearly Financial Statements are directly communicated to all shareholders. Audited yearly financial statements are published in two national dailies. Finally,
Annual General Meeting is arranged as statutory duty to give the shareholders parliamentary session to communicate their assertions about the Bank. All the suggestions or recommendations made by the shareholders in AGM or any time during the year are taken very seriously for compliance and better corporate governance of the Bank. Managing Director is the CEO of the Bank. The CEO and Board of Directors are jointly responsible for the management of the Bank. The Managing Director is responsible for day-to-day operations and in this respect observes the policy and directions of the Board of Directors. The day-to-day operations do not include measures which are unusual or extraordinary. Such measures are only taken by the Managing Director pursuant to special authorization from the Board of Directors unless waiting for a decision from the Board of Directors would seriously disadvantage the operation of the
Bank. In such cases, the Board of Directors is promptly notified of the measures. The Managing Director also ensures that
Bank’s accounts and finances conform to applicable laws and accepted standards. Therefore, being empowered by the
Board, Managing Director leads Management consisting executives of the Bank. Management functions through several committees headed by Managing Director comprising a number of executives of the Bank. The committees are
MANCOM, ALCO and Basel Committee etc. Management enjoys absolute power in respect of recruitment, posting and promotion of manpower in accordance with Bangladesh Bank’s guidelines. In addition, Board has delegated adequate administrative, business and financial power to Management for quick and efficient discharge of Bank’s activities. 4.5 LINKAGE BETWEEN COMPENSATION FOR TBL DIRECTORS, SENIOR MANAGERS AND EXECUTIVES
(INCLUDING DECISION-TAKING AGREEMENTS) AND THE ORGANISATION’S PERFORMANCE (INCLUDING
SOCIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE)
The non-executive directors (directors other than Managing Director) of the Board representing shareholders do not take any remuneration or reimbursement of any expenses for attending Board meeting or for any other purpose. The Board members receive only BDT 5,000/- for attending the Board/Committee meetings. 4.6 PROCESSES IN PLACE FOR TBL’S BOARD OF DIRECTORS TO ENSURE CONFLICTS OF INTEREST ARE
AVOIDED
TBL’s directors comply with all standards on conflict of interest in place by the regulators. All information including shareholding, business interests, etc. are disclosed properly to the regulators. The Employee’s Service Manual is applicable for all employees and different policies are applicable for internal corporate bodies demonstrates TBL’s firm commitment to avoiding conflict of interest in relations between its directors, employees, Page | 11 shareholder and customers. Breach of the Code of Conduct by any TBL employee may result in disciplinary action and sanctions in accordance with its severity. 4.7 PROCESSES IN PLACE FOR DETERMINING THE QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERTISE OF THE MEMBERS OF
TBL’S BOARD OF DIRECTORS FOR GUIDING THE ORGANISATION’S STRATEGY ON ECONOMIC,
ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL PERFORMANCE
Applicable legislation / regulations are obeyed by TBL in all instances. 4.8 INTERNALLY DEVELOPED STATEMENTS OF MISSION OR VALUES, CODES OF CONDUCT AND PRINCIPLES
RELEVANT TO ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE AND THE STATUS OF THEIR IMPLEMENTATION. EXPLAIN THE
DEGREE TO WHICH THESE ARE APPLIED ACROSS TBL IN DIFFERENT REGIONS AND DEPARTMENTS / UNITS
AND RELATE TO INTERNATIONALLY AGREED STANDARDS
TBL’s mission and strategic vision statements for 2012, is available in the 2011 Annual Report. 4.9 PROCEDURES OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS FOR OVERSEEING TBL’S IDENTIFICATION AND
MANAGEMENT OF ECONOMIC, ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL PERFORMANCE, INCLUDING RELEVANT RISKS
AND OPPORTUNITIES AND ADHERENCE OR COMPLIANCE WITH INTERNATIONALLY AGREED STANDARDS,
CODES OF CONDUCT AND PRINCIPLES AND FREQUENCY WITH WHICH IT ASSESSES SUSTAINABILITY
PERFORMANCE
There is effective oversight of the way in which TBL identifies and manages performance, risks and economic opportunities. It is described in detail in the Annual Report, from which some examples have been drawn: the Board of
Directors boards and committee, the operational risk and internal control & compliance policies and activities of the
Internal Control & Compliance Division. 4.10 PROCESSES FOR EVALUATING THE TBL’S BOARD OF DIRECTORS’ PERFORMANCE, PARTICULARLY
WITH RESPECT TO ECONOMIC, ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL PERFORMANCE
The Board Secretariat is responsible for drafting an annual report on compliance with the goals set for the Board of
Directors.

4.11 EXPLANATION ON WHETHER AND HOW THE PRECAUTIONARY PRINCIPLE OR APPROACH IS
ADDRESSED BY TBL
Through its environmental risk management policy, approved by the Board of Directors in 2011, TBL included environmental variables in its risk management policy. Furthermore, TBL also has precautionary policies and practices for operational risks and internal control & compliance, as required by law, as guaranteed by the Internal Control &
Compliance Risk Management Policy. 4.12 EXTERNALLY DEVELOPED ECONOMIC, ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL CHARTERS, PRINCIPLES, OR
OTHER INITIATIVES TO WHICH TBL SUBSCRIBES OR ENDORSES
In 2011, Bangladesh Bank has prescribed guidelines on Environmental Risk Management and Green Banking for implementation in the banking arena in Bangladesh. 4.13 SIGNIFICANT MEMBERSHIP IN ASSOCIATIONS AND/OR NATIONAL OR INTERNATIONAL ADVOCACY
ORGANISATIONS IN WHICH TBL HAS POSITIONS IN CORPORATE GOVERNANCE BODIES; PARTICIPATES IN
PROJECTS OR COMMITTEES; PROVIDES SUBSTANTIVE FUNDING BEYOND ROUTINE MEMBERSHIP DUES;
VIEWS MEMBERSHIP AS STRATEGIC.
Main organizations to which TBL belongs and considers its membership as strategic or highly important and also has positions in some governance bodies:
 Association of Bankers Bangladesh (ABB). Page | 12
4.14 LIST OF STAKEHOLDER GROUPS ENGAGED BY TBL
The stakeholders identified by TBL that needs to be kept informed, engaged with and consulted are:
 The shareholders;
 Employees;
 Private and corporate customers;
 Suppliers;
 Regulatory bodies;
 Local communities: non-governmental organizations and private charities. 4.15 BASE FOR IDENTIFICATION AND SELECTION OF STAKEHOLDERS WITH WHOM TBL ENGAGES
The Risk Management Unit of TBL has performed survey through questionnaires to identify and rank shareholders. 4.16. APPROACHES TO STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT, INCLUDING FREQUENCY OF ENGAGEMENT BY TYPE
AND BY STAKEHOLDER GROUP
Annual General Meetings (AGM) are held on annual basis between shareholders and Board of Directors of TBL. 4.17. KEY TOPICS AND CONCERNS THAT HAVE BEEN RAISED THROUGH STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT, AND
HOW TBL HAS RESPONDED TO THOSE KEY TOPICS AND CONCERNS, INCLUDING THROUGH ITS REPORTING
Question and answering sessions are part of AGM wherein the queries raised by TBL’s shareholders are addressed and noted for future implementation, if required. Page | 13
ECONOMIC MANAGEMENT APPROACH
Goals and performance
The main purpose of TBL’s strategic vision for 2011-2015 is to build a long-term sustainable financial institution through financial inclusion and deliver optimum value to all stakeholders with the highest level of compliance. The Bank’s overall mission is to deliver optimum value to our customers, employees, shareholders and the nation. Our business strategy is geared towards achieving all of these. The Bank’s policy is to deliver optimum value in a manner that is consistent with the highest level of fairness and transparency. For the Bank, it has been a case of building financial value and enhancing the bottom line through fair and ethical means. Building sustainable value of all stakeholders is an important corporate goal. In order to enhance TBLs role as a driving force in the Bangladeshi economy, Trust Bank Limited has set up branches all over the country. Policy
TBL’s economic activities, aimed at Corporate, SMEs, Retail and Islamic Banking credit and deposit clients, represents a high stake in the economic development that TBL offers to the Bangladeshi sectors, with positive impacts on the national economy in terms of its contribution to the balance of payments and economic growth. EC1 Direct economic value generated and distributed, including revenues, operating costs, employee compensation, donations and other community investments, retained earnings, and payments to capital providers and governments
Component 2010 % of Distributed
Wealth Per
Stakeholder
2011 % of Distributed
Wealth Per
Stakeholder
BDT Million BDT Million
Wealth Created 3951.37 100% 3566.91 100%
Banking Revenue (Income from Banking Services)
6857.00 8,446.94
Wealth Distributed to Stakeholders:
General Administrative Costs 692.44 17.52% 1578.58 44.25%
Employees 694.65 17.58% 756.19 21.2%
Shareholders 846.70 21.43% 357.45 10.02%
Taxes 875.00 22.14% 700 19.62%
Society 115.60 2.93% 80 2.25%
Accumulated Economic
Value (Banking Product –
Wealth Distributed)
726.98 18.40% 94.69 2.66% EC2 Financial implications and other risks and opportunities for TBL’s activities due to climate change
There are two types of environmental impacts resulting from TBL’s activity that require our attention, direct and indirect impacts. These impacts are described in this report (especially in the sections on management approach and environmental performance indicators) and refer to activity in Bangladesh by TBL.
Direct impacts are the result of work at our central buildings and branches and of travel. They take the form of consumption of energy, water and other raw materials required for normal operation and CO2 emissions from the use of fuel and other energy sources.
Indirect impacts are associated with the way in which our customers use the loans we grant and investments made by
TBL. Business activity can have negative environmental impacts, which must be considered in investments and when granting loans. This consideration must favor investment in and use of environmentally friendly technologies and the promotion of projects that in some way minimize the use of natural resources or include environmental risk management criteria in analyses of credit risks. Page | 14
Direct and indirect impacts are sources of risk. The direct impacts are essentially related to the risk of having to bear the costs of inoperability and fines and losses resulting from a bad reputation. Indirect impacts are the result of losses related to polluted collateral from foreclosed mortgages and the risk of default by companies financed for environmental reasons
(as they may be fined or suffer damage to their reputation due to environmental issues, which may lead to default in extreme cases). We can give examples of initiatives aimed at minimizing risks and creating or enhancing opportunities of this kind. Where operational risks are concerned, there is TBL’s Business Continuity Plan. This plan provides solutions in the event of disasters resulting in generalized inoperability of TBL’s physical infrastructures, while considering workstations and technological support, or in employees being unable to travel to the workplace. It provides for the following environmental events that may pose threats to TBL’s activity:
 Natural disasters: floods, earthquakes and fires;
 Environmental contamination and epidemics. The plan formalizes and promotes appropriate responses that ensure the continuation of business and the processing of operations from an organizational and technological point of view in disaster situations.
Regarding indirect impacts and their risks, TBL’s goal is to include environmental risk management aspects in company credit risk analyses. This environmental facet of credit risk assessment will help the businesses to anticipate the requirements of future legislation. EC3 Coverage of TBL’s defined benefit plan obligations
This indicator does not apply to TBL. EC4 Significant financial assistance received from government
This indicator does not apply to TBL as no financial benefits were received during 2011. EC5 Range of ratios of standard entry level wage compared to local minimum wage
The ratio between the lowest wage paid by TBL and the national minimum wage is 3.43 : 1. EC6 Policies, practices and proportion of spending on locally based suppliers
TBL has no specific policies or practices for hiring local suppliers. EC7 Procedures for local hiring and proportion of senior management hired from the local community
TBL has no procedure in place for local hiring. EC8 Development and impact of infrastructure investments and services provided primarily for public benefit through commercial, in-kind, or pro bono engagement
TBLs contributions to social and public benefits are summarized as follows:
Nature of Investment Amount in BDT Million % of Total
Sports 1.00 1.23%
Education, Financial Literacy And Training 43.98 53.99%
Health 26.51 32.54%
Historical Development 5.00 6.14%
Solidarity 2.50 3.07%
Other 2.47 3.03%
Total 81.46 100.00% EC9 – Understanding and describing significant indirect economic impacts, including the extent of impacts
TBL’s daily activity has a number of positive indirect economic impacts. Page | 15
These impacts are the result of some of the products that TBL sells and are in line with its priorities, market sustainability trends and political agendas - financing businesses (especially SMEs) and products for disadvantaged people. The main indirect economic impacts of these products are:
 Higher productivity of companies and organizations often by improving skills and knowledge;
 Economic development in less developed areas;
 Economic and financial inclusion of disadvantaged people;
 Improvement in social and environmental conditions. Page | 16
ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT APPROACH
Goals and performance
TBL’s strategic program for climate change stressed in its Green Banking Policy and is designed to help reduce TBL’s environmental impact in a scenario of sustainable development while endeavoring to instill good practices in its stakeholders. Policy
In 2011 the Green Banking Policy of Trust Bank Limited was defined containing all three phases of implementation. It defines strategic spheres of action, goals and guidelines. Organizational Responsibility
The approval of TBL’s Green Banking Policy and Environmental Risk Management Policy in 2011 will redefine and increase formal responsibilities for these issues and will involve the Board of Directors more directly. Training and awareness
Workshop on Green Banking and Environmental Risk Management took place in the Training Academy of Trust Bank
Limited in October 2011 with resource person from Bangladesh Bank. It was attended by a number of senior executives of Trust Bank Limited and discussed various aspects of Green Banking and Environmental Risk Management, highlighting the importance of the subject matter - climate change, social impacts, sustainable development, the information society and sustainable financing. Monitoring and follow-up
TBL’s environmental performance is monitored by the Green Banking Unit under the supervision of the Chief Risk Officer of the Bank. ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE INDICATORS
EN1 Materials used by weight or volume
TBL does not have a systematic procedure for calculating the total weight of raw materials used in its commercial network; the data is gathered in monetary terms. TBL has utilized following raw materials during its daily operation: Breakdown of materials used by monetary values (BDT million)
Raw Materials Used 2010 2011 Change 2011/2010
Paper 6.36 9.41 1.48 Breakdown of materials used by unit
Raw Materials Used 2010 2011 Change 2011/2010
Ink Cartridges 25 36 1.44
Toner 1442 1885 1.31
Ribbon 323 452 1.40
Fax Film 111 148 1.33 The increase in use of consumables from 2010 to 2011 was due to increase in number of branches and business portfolio. EN2 Percentage of materials used that are recycled input materials
TBL does not use recycled paper in its offices and branches. The paper used throughout our network of branches and central buildings (Legal and A4 only) is produced in Bangladesh and procured locally. Page | 17
EN3 Direct energy consumption by primary energy source
TBL’s direct energy consumption is based on non-renewable sources and is received from the local electrical power connections. In addition it used fuel as follows: petrol and diesel in its fleet, diesel in generators and natural gas in the
CNG converted vehicles. Direct energy consumption in buildings (BDT Million) 2010 2011 Change 2011/2010
Fuel Oil 25.95 6.47 0.25
Gas 0.33 0.51 1.55
The use of fuel oil during 2011 decreased substantially due to substantial improvement in power outage scenario during
2011.

Fuel consumption by TBLs fleet of cars (BDT Million)
Branch Vehicle 2010 2011 Change 2011/2010
CNG 1.141 1.58 1.39
Octane 0.69 0.81 1.17 EN4 Indirect energy consumption by primary energy source
Electricity consumption at premises (BDT Million) 2010 2011 Change 2011/2010
Head office 0.02 0.028 1.40
Branches 25.95 17.55 0.68 EN5 Energy saved due to conservation and efficiency improvements
TBL assesses the performance of initiatives of this type. However, we are not in a position to provide total savings figures.
We can, however, give several examples of this type of initiative and reductions achieved (see indicators EN18 and EN26). EN6 Initiatives to provide energy-efficient or renewable energy-based products and services, and reductions in energy requirements as a result of these initiatives
TBL offers products and services of this kind (see indicators EN5, EN26 and FS8), though it is not possible to provide figures for benefits achieved. Communicating this figure depends both on Trust Bank Limited and on end-users of this type of equipment, i.e. customers. EN7 Initiatives to reduce indirect energy consumption and reductions achieved
TBL assesses the performance of initiatives of this type. However, we are not in a position to provide total savings figures. EN8 Total water withdrawal by source
TBL does not have a systematic procedure for calculating the total volume of mains water used in its commercial network, due to the fact that TBL has branches all over the country and they have different water suppliers. Furthermore, the total amount of water used by TBL was not identified in our materiality study as a material issue to be reported. Water consumption at premises (BDT Million) 2010 2011 Change 2011/2010
Head Office & Branches 0.92 1.14 1.24 Type of water consumption considering location of building:
Location of
Building
Type of water consumed Total
Jar Tap Jar & Tap
Urban 6 17 2 25 Page | 18
Rural 23 6 14 43
Total 29 23 16 68 EN9 Water sources significantly affected by withdrawal of water
TBL does not have a systematic procedure for calculating the total volume of water used in its commercial network, due to the fact that TBL has branches all over the country and they have different water suppliers and sources. EN10 Percentage and total volume of water recycled and reused
TBL does not use recycled water in its offices and branches. EN11 Location and size of land owned, leased, managed in, or adjacent to, protected areas and areas of high biodiversity value outside protected areas
EN12 Description of significant impacts of activities, products, and services on biodiversity in protected areas and areas of high biodiversity value outside protected areas
EN13 Habitats protected or restored
EN14 Strategies, current actions, and future plans for managing impacts on biodiversity
EN15 Number of IUCN Red List species and national conservation list species with habitats in areas affected by operations, by level of extinction risk
These indicators do not apply to TBL, as its operations are located in urban and rural residential and commercial areas.
No branches are located in forests or environmentally protected areas to have any impact on biodiversity. However, TBL is contributing BDT 0.12 million per year for bird conservation project namely Pokkhikuler Asroy & Khaddo Nischitkoron
Prakalpa at Bonpara, Natore. EN16 Total direct and indirect greenhouse gas emissions by weight
Total direct and indirect greenhouse gas emissions resulting from TBL’s activities arise essentially from its energy consumption. However, TBL does not have a systematic procedure for calculating total greenhouse gas emissions, both direct and indirect. EN17 Other relevant indirect greenhouse gas emissions by weight
TBL does not have a systematic procedure for calculating total greenhouse gas emissions, both direct and indirect. EN18 Initiatives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and reductions achieved
TBL has taken up initiatives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in its operations through concentrated efforts of its Head
Office and Branches through in-house environmental management systems, reduction of electricity usage replacement of existing lighting equipment with energy efficient ones, carpooling, teleconferencing, etc. In addition, TBL has taken up initiatives for keeping pot plants in the branches to act as carbon sinks targeting its urban branches. Information of pot plants is as follows:
Type of Branch No of pot plants within office
Rural 173
Urban 1067
Grand Total 1240 EN19 Emissions of ozone-depleting substances by weight
According to the Global Reporting Initiative, ozone-depleting substances in products and equipment from use or disposal are not covered by this indicator. It therefore does not apply to TBL. EN20 NOx, SOx and other significant air emissions by type and weight
Considering the energy consumption by the emergency generators and TBL’s vehicles is insignificant, this indicator is not considered material. Page | 19 EN21 Total water discharge by quality and destination
TBL’s premises are located in urban and rural residential and commercial areas with sewer and rainwater drainage systems, which mean that this indicator does not apply to its activities. EN22 Total weight of waste by type and disposal method
TBL does not have a systematic procedure for calculating the total volume of waste produced in its commercial network. EN23 Total number and volume of significant spills
This indicator does not apply to TBL, as it does not use chemical products in any significant quantities that might cause spills with relevant environmental impacts. EN24 Weight of transported, imported, exported, or treated waste deemed hazardous under the terms of the
Basel Convention Annex I, II, III, and VIII, and percentage of transported waste shipped internationally
This indicator does not apply to TBL, as it does not use chemical products in any significant quantities that might cause spills with relevant environmental impacts. EN25 Identity, size, protected status, and biodiversity value of water bodies and related habitats significantly affected by the reporting organization’s discharges of water and runoff
TBL does not have a systematic procedure for calculating the effect of discharge of water and runoff in its commercial network. EN26 Initiatives to mitigate environmental impacts of products and services, and extent of impact mitigation
This indicator does not apply to TBL, as it does not use chemical/biological/toxic etc. substances in any significant quantities that might cause environmental impacts. EN27 Percentage of products sold and their packaging materials that are reclaimed by category
In 2011, TBL issued 111,990 debit and credit cards. Total amount of plastic used is negligible. EN28 Monetary value of significant fines and total number of non-monetary sanctions for noncompliance with environmental laws and regulations
In 2011 there were no significant fines or non-monetary sanctions for violation of environmental laws or regulations. EN29 Significant environmental impacts of transporting products and other goods and materials used for the organization’s operations, and transporting members of the workforce
TBL does not have a systematic procedure for calculating total greenhouse gas emissions, from its vehicle fleet’s fuel usage. EN30 Total environmental protection expenditures and investments by type
TBL’s environmental protection expenditures and investments are accounted for. Full communication of this type of expenditure pursuant to environmental accounting standards is a future commitment. Page | 20
LABOUR MANAGEMENT APPROACH
Goals and performance
Promotion to next hierarchy designation is considered subject to availability of vacancy in the next grade along with adequate skill set, potentially to take over broader responsibility. No employee will have a claim to be promoted to a higher grade by virtue of his seniority alone. All promotions shall be made on the basis of performance and criterion laid down by the Management of the TBL from time to time. Policies
TBL has created an atmosphere of trust and support within the organization which will encourage employees to work well together as a team. TBL also guarantees employment opportunities conform to the established and acceptable practices of the country. Organizational responsibility
TBL has developed an effective internal communication and attachment system which will encourage the employees to identify them with the organizations and its activities. Training and awareness
The bank identifies the interdependence between the employer and the employee and believes that each should give the other a fair treatment. Therefore, Bank usually arranges, as well as, participate various trainings and workshops on different type’s compliance related issues to act in accordance with the laws and practice of industry and the country for raising awareness in relation to the Labor Aspects. LABOUR PERFORMANCE INDICATORS
LA1 Total workforce by employment type, employment contract, and region
Direct employees by type of contract and employment as at 31 December
Type of Contract 2010 2011 Part-time Full-Time Total Part-time Full-Time Total
Fixed Term Contract 0 67 67 0 71 71 Internship programs 2010 2011
Interns 45 32
No Of Internships 450 360
No Of Student Internships 450 360 Employees by Division or district
Division 2010 2011
Dhaka 778 798
Chittagong 175 191
Sylhet 54 52
Rajshahi 36 48
Barishal 4 6
Khulna 22 23
Rangpur 10 11

Page | 21
LA2 Total number and rate of employee turnover by age group, gender, and region
Trust Bank Limited has a diversified team in terms of gender and age group. In 2011, 71 employees left, most of them in the 18 to 34 age group (for better opportunities). Total number of employees leaving by age and gender
Gender Age Group 2010 2011
Female Over 65 0 0
55 to 64 0 1
45 to 54 0 0
35 to 44 1 8
18 to 34 9 23
Total 10 32
Male Over 65 0 0
55 to 64 02 0
45 to 54 04 5
35 to 44 09 16
18 to 34 56 97
Total 71 118 Turnover by age and gender
Gender Age Group 2010 2011
Female Over 65 0 0
55 to 64 0 33.33
45 to 54 0 0
35 to 44 1.48 11.85
18 to 34 3.97 10.15
Male Over 65 0 0
55 to 64 16 0
45 to 54 9.09 11.36
35 to 44 5.49 9.76
18 to 34 9.65 16.71 Methodological note: Turnover for each period was calculated as follows: [(No. of employees leaving during the period /
Average no. of employees during the period)]*100 LA3 Benefits provided to full-time employees that are not provided to temporary or part-time employees
Employee benefits
Benefit Permanent Employees Contractual Employees
Invalidity Pension Superannuation Fund N/A
Retirement Benefits Provident Fund, Gratuity and Leave Encashment N/A LA4 Percentage of employees covered by collective bargaining agreements
These indicators do not apply to TBL. LA5 Minimum notice period(s) regarding operational changes, including whether it is specified in collective agreements As per Employee’s Service Manual of TBL, minimum notice period varies on case to case basis. Page | 22
LA6 Percentage of total workforce represented in formal joint management–worker health and safety committees that help monitor and advice on occupational health and safety programmes
These indicators do not apply to TBL. LA7 Rates of injury, occupational diseases, lost days, absenteeism, and number of work-related fatalities by region These indicators do not apply to TBL. LA8 Education, training, counseling, prevention, and risk-control programs in place to assist workforce members, their families, or community members regarding serious diseases
These indicators do not apply to TBL. LA9 Health and safety topics covered in formal agreements with trade unions
These indicators do not apply to TBL. LA10 Average hours of training per year per employee by employee category
Hours of Training by employee category
Year 2011
Training Category Training Programs Participants
In-house Training 39 1299
Local Training 78 120
Foreign Training Nil Nil
Total 117 1419 LA11 Programs for skills management and lifelong learning that support the continued employability of employees and assist them in managing career endings
TBL ensures that each employee is developed as fully as his or her ability, performance and opportunity within which the
Bank may permit. To this end periodic reviews will be made to determine the performance and potential of employees and, if necessary, the training required to enable them to progress more senior positions. LA12 Percentage of employees receiving regular performance and career development reviews
Hundred percent of confirmed employees are receiving regular performance and career development reviews. LA13 Composition of governance bodies and breakdown of employees per category according to gender, age group, minority group membership, and other indicators of diversity Employees by category and gender Male Female 2010 2011 2010 2011
Executive 90 94 8 7
Officer 680 734 299 292
Support Staff 2 2 0 0
Total 772 830 307 299 Number of employees by category and age group
GRI Category Age Group 2010 2011
Executive 18 to 34 5 7
35 to 44 52 53 Page | 23
45 to 54 29 31
55 to 64 12 10
Over 65 0 0
Total 98 101
Officer 18 to 34 798 800
35 to 44 156 202
45 to 54 20 20
55 to 64 5 4
Over 65 0 0
Total 979 1026
Support Staff 18 to 34 2 2
35 to 44 0 0
45 to 54 0 0
55 to 64 0 0
Over 65 0 0
Total 2 2
Total 1079 1129 LA14 Ratio of basic salary of men to women by employee category
Ratio of average salaries of men and women by category
Category Ratio in 2010 Ratio in 2011
Executive 1.07 : 1 1.15 : 1
Officer 1 : 1.05 1 : 1.05
Total 1 : 0.91 1 : 0.95 Page | 24
HUMAN RIGHTS MANAGEMENT APPROACH
Goals and performance
The way in which human rights issues are managed at TBL is reflected in its labor management approach. TBL deals with
People, not paper, not the rigid application with policies. Organizational responsibility
Organizational responsibility in human rights
POLICY / PROGRAMME CORPORATE BODIES WITH FORMAL RESPONSIBILITY
Human Resource Aspects Human Resources Division
Supplier Relations General Services & Security Department Training and awareness
Trust Bank Training Academy has been working with its full dedication & efforts and continuous support from
Management to provide excellence in Banking through development of attitude, knowledge and skill, keeping in view the organizational goal. The human rights aspects are a well-established part of the numerous training curriculums of
Foundation and Advanced Training programs undertaken each year by the academy. HUMAN RIGHTS PERFORMANCE INDICATORS
HR1 Percentage and total number of significant investment agreements that include human rights clauses or that have undergone human rights screening
These indicators do not apply to TBL. HR2 Percentage of significant suppliers and contractors that have undergone screening on human rights and actions taken
TBL undertakes to treat all suppliers equally in accordance with the procurement policy approved by its Board of
Directors. Although we do not yet conduct specific human rights screening of suppliers, this aspect is one of TBL’s future commitments. HR3 Total hours of employee training on policies and procedures concerning aspects of human rights that are relevant to operations, including the percentage of employees trained.
Total hours of employee training
Name of Training Nos. of Training Total Hours Employees Trained % of Employees
Foundation Training 2 144 45 3.83%
Advanced Training 4 300 102 8.68%
Refreshers Course 6 240 138 11.74% HR4 Total number of incidents of discrimination and actions taken
There have been no incidents of discrimination in TBL during 2011. HR5 Operations identified in which the right to exercise freedom of association and collective bargaining may be at significant risk, and actions taken to support these rights
These indicators do not apply to TBL. HR6 Operations identified as having significant risk for incidents of child labour, and measures taken to contribute to the elimination of child labour
These indicators do not apply to TBL. HR7 Operations identified as having significant risk for incidents of forced or compulsory labour, and measures to contribute to the elimination of forced or compulsory labour
These indicators do not apply to TBL. Page | 25
SOCIAL MANAGEMENT APPROACH
Goals and performance
TBL sets clearly defined goals for a wide variety of society-related aspects. Examples are our different commitments, such as financial inclusion, community engagement, and compliance. The performance indicators on these issues can be found in this section. Policies
The following are examples of TBL’s social policies:  The TBL Employees Service Manual is for all its employees and it reinforces TBL’s commitment to the highest ethical and moral standards;
 The operational risk management, internal control & compliance risk management, and money laundering risk management manual requires internal control systems to guarantee respect for the law and regulations on the prevention of money laundering and funding of terrorism;
 The annual plans of activities of the Internal Control & Compliance Division, which ensure that legislation, regulations and internal rules are respected by the different corporate bodies;
 Internal control procedures for money laundering. Organizational responsibility
The Board of Directors are ultimately responsible for the correct implementation of the above policies, programs and commitments which have been formally delegated to corporate bodies as detailed below. Policies and programs and organizational responsibility
Policy/Programme Corporate Bodies With Formal Responsibility
Employee’s Service Manual Human Resources Division
Operational Risk Management Internal Control & Compliance Division
Internal Control & Compliance Risk Management Internal Control & Compliance Division
Money Laundering Risk Management Central Compliance Unit & AML Department Training and awareness
Trust Bank Training Academy has been working with its full dedication & efforts and continuous support from
Management to provide excellence in Banking through development of attitude, knowledge and skill, keeping in view the organizational goal. The social management aspect is a well-established part of the numerous training curriculums of
Foundation and Advanced Training programs undertaken each year by the academy. SOCIAL PERFORMANCE INDICATORS
SO1 Nature, scope, and effectiveness of any programs and practices that assess and manage the impacts of operations on communities, including entering, operating, and exiting
As decisions on opening or closing branches and offices are included in the bank’s strategic growth, as a rule TBL conducts studies of the impact of these decisions on the region’s economy and economic development conducted by the
Operations Division. Before TBL begins operations in a new location, it drafts a business plan, which includes an analysis of the impact on the local community. Several factors are analyzed when identifying these impacts, such as the current and future scale of the region, the community’s socio-economic conditions, existing business activity, the needs of local
SMEs, existing competition and potential complementarity and improvement in the services of the local commercial network. After these analyses, it may happen that TBL will open a branch even though the prospects for business growth in the area are not favorable. This is because its intention is to be present in many points of the country and promote access to banking services to as many people as possible, even in places with low population density and buying power, with a view to financial inclusion. Page | 26
These practices are closely related to the fact that TBL always seeks to establish long-lasting, personalized business relationships with companies and private customers, which means that employees’, customers’ and the community’s interests are considered when entering or exiting. SO2 Percentage and total number of business units analyzed for risks related to corruption
Risks of corruption are analyzed in the Internal Control & Compliance Risk Management and by the Internal Control &
Compliance Division. In 2011 the Internal Control & Compliance Division conducted on-site audits of:
 No. of Comprehensive Audit: 63
 No. of Spot Inspection: 20
 No. of Special Inspection: 19 SO3 Percentage of employees trained in TBL’s anti-corruption policies and procedures
Number of employees trained in prevention of money laundering and funding of terrorism by category
Category Number of Employees Nos. of Training Total Hours
Officers / Executives 200 4 32 SO4 Actions taken in response to incidents of corruption
There was no incident of corruption in TBL in 2011. SO5 Public policy positions and participation in public policy development and lobbying
TBL responds to requests for opinions on current standards from regulatory bodies, providing them with its views and positions, which contribute to the drafting of legal documents regarding the sector’s activity. It also participates in sectoral working groups, where it expresses its opinions. S06 Total value of financial and in-kind contributions to political parties, politicians, and related institutions by country. This indicator is not applicable for TBL as there were no contribution of this form during 2011. SO7 Total number of legal actions for anticompetitive behavior, anti-trust, and monopoly practices and their outcomes No legal actions were brought against TBL for anticompetitive behavior or monopoly practices in 2011. SO8 Monetary value of significant fines and total number of non-monetary sanctions for noncompliance with laws and regulations
No instances of monetary or non-monetary fines / sanctions were brought against TBL for noncompliance with laws and regulations in 2011. Page | 27
PRODUCT RESPONSIBILITY MANAGEMENT APPROACH
Goals and performance
With this end in view, we chalked out a 5-year plan for the Bank and started implementing it from 2011 containing action path `Build long term capacity within 2012 and achieve higher trajectory of growth from 2013 onward’. The roll out plan evolve around realizing three key objectives such as achieve long term sustainable growth, build capacity for financial inclusion, and remain accountable to all stakeholders indiscriminately. The different commitments in this report are an example of this, such as those concerning business, stakeholder engagement and communication. The performance indicators on these issues are shown in this section. Policies
The Internal Control & Compliance Division is a TBL corporate body that answers directly to the Board of Directors and is responsible for monitoring compliance with the duty to provide legal and regulatory information on TBL’s products and services. Furthermore, all corporate bodies involved in product / service development are responsible for fulfilling these duties. Organizational responsibility
The above goals and commitments are considered strategic by the Board of Directors, which is ultimately responsible for proper compliance with these goals, programs and initiatives. Policies and programs and organizational responsibility
Policy / Programme Body With Formal Responsibility
Quality Of Service Assessment Program Internal Control & Complaisance Division
Centralizing, Analysis and Handling Of Suggestions and Complaints Complaint Cell at Head Office & Office of
Cluster Heads
Compliance With Regulatory Compliance Internal Control & Complaisance Division
Business Continuity Plan IT Division Training and Awareness
Trust Bank Training Academy has been working with its full dedication & efforts and continuous support from
Management to provide excellence in Banking through development of attitude, knowledge and skill, keeping in view the organizational goal. The product responsibility aspects of the financial products of Trust Bank Limited are a well- established part of the numerous training curriculums of Foundation and Advanced Training programs undertaken each year by the academy. PRODUCT RESPONSIBILITY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS
PR1 Life cycle stages in which health and safety impacts of products and services are assessed for improvement, and percentage of significant products and services categories subject to such procedures
TBL’s products and services have no direct impact on its customers’ health or safety and so it has no specific procedure for assessing them. However, TBL provides all its customers with information on the safe use of its internet banking services, credit and debit card safety. PR2 Total number of incidents of non-compliance with regulations and voluntary codes concerning health and safety impacts of products and services during their life cycle, by type of outcomes.
No instances of incidents of non-compliance were charged against TBL in 2011. PR3 Type of product and service information required by procedures, and percentage of significant products and services subject to such information requirements
TBL has a set product development process namely Product Program Guidelines provide clear information on the issue, sale and advertising of all TBL financial products and services. These rules include the specific conditions and characteristics of each product and service. In addition, TBL’s enlisted legal advisors are utilized for legal screening of the Page | 28 products. PR4 Total number of incidents of non-compliance with regulations and voluntary codes concerning product and service information and labeling, by type of outcomes.
No instances of incidents of non-compliance were charged against TBL in 2011. PR5 Practices related to customer satisfaction, including results of surveys measuring customer satisfaction
Ongoing improvement of quality of service and customer satisfaction is one of TBL’s strategic priorities. Information regarding complaints is as follows: Number of complaints 2010 2011
Total For Year
NIL NIL
Daily Average Main subjects of complaints
Means of Payment Nil
Credit Nil
Banking Network Nil
Deposits And Financial Investment Nil
Automated Services Nil
Others Nil PR6 Programs for adherence to laws, standards, and voluntary codes related to marketing communications, including advertising, promotion, and sponsorship
Marketing communications, advertising, promotion, and sponsorship for TBL’s financial products and services comply with all duties of information required by law. PR7 Total number of incidents of non-compliance with regulations and voluntary codes concerning marketing communications, including advertising, promotion, and sponsorship by type of outcomes.
No instances of incidents of non-compliance were charged against TBL in 2011. PR8 Total number of substantiated complaints regarding breaches of customer privacy and losses of customer data. No instances of substantiated complaints were received for breaches of customer privacy and losses of customer data. PR9 Monetary value of significant fines for non-compliance with laws and regulations concerning the provision and use of products and services
No instances of fines were charged against TBL for non-compliance with laws and regulations concerning the provision and use of products and services in 2011.

Page | 29
SOCIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF PRODUCTS AND SERVICES
(FINANCIAL SERVICE SECTOR SUPPLEMENT)
Goals and performance
TBL’s sustainability strategy devotes special attention to managing the environmental and social impacts of its products and services. Policies
One of TBL’s strategic goals is to establish formal policies that reflect its commitments concerning the environmental and social impacts of the products that it sells. Examples include the Board of Directors’ approval of Green Banking Policy
Manual for sustainability in our environmental policy Organizational responsibility
TBL’s Green Banking Policy for sustainability enumerates these issues and was approved in 2011. Training and awareness
Trust Bank Training Academy has been working with its full dedication & efforts and continuous support from Management to provide excellence in Banking through development of attitude, knowledge and skill, keeping in view the organizational goal. One of TBL’s strategic goals is to provide employees with training and increase their awareness of the environmental and social impacts of our products and services. The aspects of the financial products and services provided by Trust
Bank Limited are a well-established part of the numerous training curriculums of Foundation and Advanced Training programs undertaken each year by the academy. Monitoring and follow-up
The policy of governance for sustainability approved by the Board of Directors in 2011 will ensure the monitoring and follow-up of social and environmental policies and practices concerning products and services. PERFORMANCE INDICATORS FROM THE FINANCIAL SERVICE SECTOR SUPPLEMENT
FS1 Policies with specific environmental and social components applied to business lines
The inclusion of environmental aspects in the design and sale of products and services is one of the facets of Green
Banking Policy Manual of Trust Bank Limited. Furthermore, TBL’s environmental risk management policy has been approved and thereby strengthens the bank’s commitment. TBL has formal policies addressing the environmental risk components. FS2 Procedures for assessing and screening environmental and social risks in business lines
The consideration of environmental and social criteria in the evaluation of credit risk is one of TBL’s strategic commitments. TBL is working towards compliance of the environmental laws of the Government of Bangladesh and the
Environmental Risk Management guideline of Bangladesh Bank. Although a proper analysis has not yet been conducted of the environmental and social risks of TBL’s business lines, it is certainly working towards this end. FS3 Processes for monitoring clients’ implementation of and compliance with environmental and social requirements included in agreements or transactions
TBL is monitoring compliance of through obtaining of Site and Environmental Clearance Certificates and on-site visits to check compliance of environmental and social covenants. FS4 Process(es) for improving staff competency to implement the environmental and social policies and procedures as applied to business lines
There are several examples of training and environmental awareness campaigns for TBL employees:
 Workshops were arranged by TBL and conducted by Mr. Khondaker Morshed Millat, Joint Director of Banking
Regulation & Policy Department, Bangladesh Bank on Green Banking and Environmental Risk Management for
Executives and Officers of TBL. Page | 30
FS5 Interactions with clients/investees/business partners regarding environmental and social risks and opportunities TBL is working on arranging training and awareness building events for clients and stakeholders. FS6 Percentage of the portfolio for business lines by specific region, size (e.g. micro/SME/large) and by sector
Credit disbursed by economic activity (BDT Millions) 2010 2011
Economic Activity BDT Millions % BDT Millions %
Agriculture 202.80 0.47% 364.20 0.73%
Industry (Other than Working Capital) 3,193.10 7.34% 5,754.40 11.56%
Working Capital 11,167.00 25.68% 14,984.60 30.09%
Export Financing 193.00 0.44% 784.30 1.58%
Import Financing 9,559.60 21.99% 6,828.10 13.71%
Transport & Communication 377.20 0.87% 729.50 1.47%
Internal Trade Financing 5,367.20 12.34% 6,034.50 12.12%
Housing 4,723.20 10.86% 3,809.30 7.65%
Special Programme 0.00 0.00% 53.30 0.11%
Others 8,695.20 20.00% 10,451.50 20.99%
Total 43,478.30 100.00% 49,793.70 100.00% Credit outstanding by type of customer (BDT Millions) 2010 2011
Type of Customer BDT Millions % BDT Millions %
Retails Loans 6,153.43 15.46% 8,981.71 17.68%
SMEs 1,815.00 4.56% 2,716.09 5.35%
Corporate 29,752.87 74.76% 36,997.45 72.83%
Islamic Banking 642.89 1.62% 1,091.96 2.15%
Staff Loan 246.85 0.62% 298.73 0.59%
Merchant Banks & Brokerage House 1,188.86 2.99% 715.80 1.41%
Total 39,799.90 100.00% 50,801.74 100.00% Deposits by type of customer (BDT Millions) 2010 2011
Type of Customer Amount in Million % Amount in Million %
INDIVIDUAL/JOINT AC 33,759.67 67.84% 46,589.44 71.36%
Current & SND 2,467.00 4.96% 3,772.05 5.78%
DPS 1,187.91 2.39% 1,535.64 2.35%
Savings 5,126.81 10.30% 5,533.11 8.47%
Term Deposit 24,977.95 50.19% 35,748.64 54.75%
LIMITED COMPANIES 8,056.08 16.19% 6,649.66 10.18%
Current & SND 2,943.16 5.91% 1,839.02 2.82%
DPS 0.02 0.00% 0.03 0.00%
Savings 5.97 0.01% 19.65 0.03%
Term Deposit 5,106.93 10.26% 4,790.97 7.34%
PARTNERSHIP 71.31 0.14% 94.25 0.14%
Current & SND 28.29 0.06% 57.22 0.09%
DPS 0.10 0.00% 0.16 0.00%
Savings 0.54 0.00% 0.57 0.00% Page | 31
Term Deposit 42.38 0.09% 36.30 0.06%
PROPRIETORY CONCERNS 859.98 1.73% 1,056.81 1.62%
Current & SND 599.30 1.20% 602.71 0.92%
DPS 0.45 0.00% 0.38 0.00%
Savings 4.19 0.01% 2.99 0.00%
Term Deposit 256.04 0.51% 450.73 0.69%
SOCITIES, CLUB 3,722.15 7.48% 6,205.01 9.50%
Current & SND 1,285.19 2.58% 1,601.62 2.45%
Savings 116.20 0.23% 215.05 0.33%
Term Deposit 2,320.76 4.66% 4,388.33 6.72%
STAFF 347.69 0.70% 579.82 0.89%
Current & SND 119.94 0.24% 232.62 0.36%
DPS 19.35 0.04% 24.80 0.04%
Savings 80.40 0.16% 80.42 0.12%
Term Deposit 127.99 0.26% 241.98 0.37%
Others 2,950.23 5.93% 4,117.27 6.31%
Grand Total 49,767.12 100.00% 65,292.26 100.00% FS7 Monetary value of products and services designed to deliver a specific social benefit for each business line
Monetary value of products and services designed to deliver a specific social benefit for each business line.
Business
Line
Product /
Service
Description of Product /
Service
Amount disbursed in
Million BDT
Socio-economic benefits
Retail
Banking
House Building
Loan (Mortgage)

Purchasing apartment,
Constructing New House(s),
Taking over of house
Building Loans from other
Banks/Non-Banking
Finance Institutions.
570.46 We have disbursed this amount to 306
Defense personnel; can easily able to make their house building and accommodate them.
Moreover; after retirement they get benefit from their rental income. About 3000 people directly or indirectly receive benefit.
Apon Nibash
(House Finance) Purchasing apartment,
Constructing New House(s),
Taking over of house
Building Loans from other
Banks/Non-Banking
Finance Institutions.
55.31 We have disbursed this amount to 245 individuals. Its results and helping to make townships specially in metropolitan areas’ where directly or indirectly 2500 urban people accommodated
Army Officers
Housing Scheme
Loan

To purchase residential plots for house building by the defense officers from
"Jolshiri Abashon " a sister concern of Army Housing
Scheme
175.70 We have disbursed this amount to 1563
Defense Personnel in service, This is resulting housing community for defense officers and all about 7800 community people directly or indirectly receive benefit.
Marriage Loan
Scheme (MLS) Defense Personnel (in the age group from 26 to 40 years ranking from 2nd lieutenant to above.
7.11 We have disbursed this amount to 541 among the Defense Personnel in service for making family bonding.
Marriage Loan
Scheme (MLS) for other ranks
Defense Personnel (JCO and other ranks) 2.00 We have disbursed this amount to 473 in service JCO and other ranks; resulting in the said segmented income group can easily make their happy journey to their married life. Page | 32
SME Trust – Bunon To meet the fund requirement of the owner of
Power loom, Handloom and other allied Industries for purchasing fixed asset and working capital to run the business 311.30 We have disbursed this amount to 187 enterprises which resulting permanent employment of 2409 people.
Trust -
Prochesta
Loan for Women entrepreneurs 114.00 We have disbursed this amount to 149 enterprises which resulting permanent employment of 447 women.
Trust - Shufola Loan for Bio-gas, Solar energy, fisheries, livestock,
Poultry and agro-processing units 152.00 We have disbursed this amount to 472 enterprises which resulting permanent employment of 472 families, production of
2025.60 m3 gas, production of 11816 litter milk, production of 12660 kg organic fertilizer per day and 432 ton fish per season.
Trust- Ekota Group Loan for micro, small enterprises with cluster approach 7.80 We have disbursed this amount to 160 micro enterprises which resulting permanent employment of 160 families for production of
Nakshikantha, Gamchha, pottery and others.
Corporate Square Hospital 320 beds capacity tertiary care hospital providing international standard multidisciplinary Health
Services to the people.
Term Loan /W.
Capital
F-300
NF-150

i) Provides international standard health services at least cost. ii) Helps saving foreign currency. iii) Creates employment.
Summit Group i) Generates power for industries and households. ii) Contributes in economic development. Term Loan /W.
Capital
F-18050
NF-2400
i) Helps combating national power crisis by producing 560 MW power. ii) Industrialization will take place and more employment opportunity will be created. iii) Facilitates children to go to school due to electrification. Brac Provides collateral free loans to the poor people. W. Capital
F-900
NF-50
i) Creates self-employment of 3,50,000 farmers. ii) Creates employment for 9.00 million poor people. ii) 4.6 million disadvantaged children will have opportunity to learn in BRAC school. iii) Creates sensitization among the poor people. Buro Tangail Provides collateral free loans to the poor people. Term Loan
F-45.00 out of syndicated finance of Tk.
i) Creates self-employment of 0.28 million poor people. ii) Creates sensitization among the poor people. Owntech Generates power for the marginalized and poor people of Barkal under
Rangamati District.
Term loan
F-9.67
i) Generates electricity 250KW/per hour for people living around the project. ii) People educationally and economically will be benefited.
Grameenphone Provides telecommunication services. W. Capital
F-800
NF-1200
i) Number of subscribers reached to 36 million. ii) Network coverage nearly 99 percent of the country's population. iii) Rural people will have day to day market information. Banglalink Provides telecommunication services. Term Loan
F-500
Number of subscribers reached to 50.47 million. FS8 Monetary value of products and services designed to deliver a specific environmental benefit for each business line Page | 33
Amount of products with positive impacts on the environment in each business line
Business Line Amount of products with positive impacts on the environment in each business line
SME Bio-gas plant finance – BDT 115.70 million.
Corporate Project finance having ETP – BDT 18.13 million. FS9 Coverage and frequency of audits to assess implementation of environmental and social policies and risk assessment procedures
One of TBL’s goals is to make an effort to conduct specific audits to assess implementation of environmental risk management policy under the environmental due diligence and environmental risk rating assessment models prescribed by Bangladesh Bank. This type of audit is being implemented from 2012. FS10 Percentage and number of companies held in TBL’s portfolio with which it has interacted on environmental or social issues
Efforts are ongoing for implementation of environmental risk management guidelines of Bangladesh Bank to mitigate environmental issues. FS11 Percentage of assets subject to positive and negative environmental or social screening
TBL does not have any assets that fall under the above categories. FS12 Voting policy(ies) applied to environmental or social issues for shares over which TBL holds the right to vote shares or advises on voting
TBL recognizes its importance as an institutional investor. However, Trust Bank Limited is essentially a commercial bank but it does not have shareholdings in companies in which it has voting right. FS13 Access points in low-populated or economically disadvantaged areas
TBL has a bank distribution network in Bangladesh that covers the entire country and enables it to provide financial products and services in low-populated or economically disadvantaged areas. TBL therefore plays a crucial role in the financial inclusion of disadvantaged populations. Distribution of commercial network in Bangladesh:
Division Branches SME/Agri Centres Head Offices
Dhaka 28 4 3
Chittagong 18 - -
Sylhet 6 1 -
Rajshahi 4 2 -
Barishal 1 - -
Khulna 3 - -
Rangpur 2 - -
Total 62 7 3 FS14 Initiatives to provide access to financial services for disadvantaged people
TBL believes and acknowledges that people has right to get financial services at minimum price wherever they stay either in city or very remote village. Besides opening new branches, TBL delivers services through SME service centers, ATMs,
Pay points, Customer Care Centers, Mobile Money, and Internet Banking. TBL is also materializing its financial inclusion through activities such financing renewable energy Bio-Gas Plant, financing farmers under ‘Four Cow Model’ and ‘Trust
Sufla etc. FS15 Policies for the fair design and sale of financial products and services
TBL abides by the requirements and regulations issued by regulators to ensure the design and sale of financial products and services. It also has internal standards to ensure that its interests and those of its employees are in line with Page | 34 customers’ expectations. FS16 Initiatives to enhance financial literacy by type of beneficiary
TBL is working on arranging training and awareness building events for clients and stakeholders.…...

Similar Documents

Premium Essay

Green Banking

...Green Banking GREEN  BANKING 1.  Title : Green Banking 2. Duration : 04 working days 3. Frequency : 01 4. Nature : Residential 5. Target Group :  Principal Officer or  Equivalent Officer and above 6. Methods : Lecture, Group Discussion, Case Study and Project Visit 7. Resource Person :     BIBM Faculty and Professionals from Financial and other Institutions 8. Objectives a. To discuss/analyze concepts, policies, rules, regulations, instruments and administrative framework related to Green Banking. b. To familiarize the participants with the involvement of banks and other organizations for developing relevant skills. c. To discuss the problems and potentials of introducing Green Banking in banks in Bangladesh. 9. Contents a. Concept, Evolution, Functions, Benefits, Policies, Regulations, Types, Environmental Issues, Local, National, Private and Global Initiatives and Participation, CSR and Green Banking. b. International Conventions, Treaties, Guidelines and Standards, Kyoto Protocol and Climate Change, Equator Principles (EPs), UN Principles for Responsible Investment (UNPRI), UN Global Compact, UNEP Finance Initiative Statements, etc. c. Policy and Regulatory Environment for Green Banking in Bangladesh, BB Policy Guidelines for Green Banking, Environmental Risk Management Guideline of BB. d. In-house Environment Management in Banks, Online Banking and Green Banking, Energy Efficiency, Paper Saving, Water Saving, Waste Management in Banks. e. Product Ecology, Green......

Words: 417 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Green Banking in Bangladesh

...COUNSELLING | MY BDJOBS | JOB MAIL SERVICE | CAREER Category : Banking/Insurance /Leasing Standard Chartered Bank Graduate Program No. of Vacancies : N/A [Job Source:Bdjobs.com Online job posting, Posting Date: November 11, 2012 ] Store this Job to My BdJobs Cart Share this job Job Description / Responsibility Now, more than ever the world needs growth. By the helping to meet the needs of growing populations, banks have a fundamental role Ii strengthening economies. Supporting million of individuals to achieve their goals, partnering with small and medium enterprises, helping to drive trade and growth, enabling businesses to expand and create jobs- without banks the world would literally stand still. What is important to you? what are you looking for when you graduate? The Banking & Finance sector is complex, yet interesting. It`s confusing, yet highly stimulating. The landscape is constantly changing. Second by second, minute by minute, market fluctuate, new technologies emerge and customer expectations evolve. Does complexity, innovation and pace stimulate you. We believe a bank can be a force for good. We’re well placed to take advantage of the economic shift from west to East. If you want experience in the most exciting growth markets, if you want to explore an industry that is evolving at an epic pace arid most importantly, if you want to help shape the next decade of banking, then connect with us to explore the opportunities. what good......

Words: 369 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Green Banking

...The Importance of Accounting in Today’s World In the business world, accounting is one discipline of study that all people, regardless of job position, should have some knowledge of. Its concepts can be applied to all job specialties, its importance has been promoted in recent years, and it is useful in people’s everyday lives. First, an accounting education is important because it can be applied in all job specialties. Secretaries must use accounting skills to manage the company check book and orders, auditors have to study financial statements to evaluate the accuracy and integrity of the business, and executives need to judge the success of their business using accounting statements from the past and present. These are just a few of the many possible positions where an understanding of accounting is necessary. Another reason all business students should have some background in accounting is because in recent years, people in the business world have been held more accountable for their financial practices. Since the Enron and WorldCom crisis when independent auditor Arthur Anderson failed to report illegal accounting practices, the SEC has been monitoring public corporations more closely. Thus, companies require some basic knowledge of accounting to avoid any future misstatements unintentionally occurring. Additionally, it is vital that everyone, not just business students, acquire an understanding of accounting for personal benefit. People use......

Words: 301 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Green Banking

... * side seam * bottom * neck back drop * arm hole straight * arm hole curve * neck front drop * sleeve length from CBN * shoulder slope * waist * collar bad width * placket opening * placket length * waist band width * side seam excluding waist band * side seam including waist band * leg opening * leg hem height * fly opening * crotch seam * Thai * hip Shipment The shipment department has following procedure Receiving of packs Racking Information to quality assurance department Quality assurance audit pink slip if rejected Green slip if ok Scans and shipped The hole can be rejected on the basis of this quality audit Process in Apparel Division of MTM Following steps are involved in all processes of apparel division; PPC merchandiser Communication with customer Proto Samples Fit Samples Size Samples Pre Production Approvals of Fabric, Color, Lab Dips Order Received with Time Line Fabric PO Forwarded to Mills Fabric Arrives from Mills QC Checking Fabric Received in store Cutting Planning QC and QA Checking Cutting According to Cutting Plan Bar coding Bundling (Roll To Roll & Lot Wise) ticketing Induction Stitching unit receiving hanging initial or prep operations swing operations In...

Words: 12496 - Pages: 50

Premium Essay

Green Banking

...Green Banking activities in EXIM Bank Compiled by: Sheikh Moyeen Uddin Executive Vice President IRMAD-II, EXIM Bank, Head Office, Dhaka. What is Green Banking i.e Environmental Risk Management & its purpose? It’s a Banking for saving the environment from different hazards and pollution. A risk due to environmental impacts caused by environmental conditions generating an element of uncertainty or possibility of loss in the context of a financing transaction. Purpose The overall purpose of Environmental Risk Management is to understand and manage risk that arises from environmental concerns. This brings a focus on planning and implementing policies and procedures to mitigate environmental risks. The specific purposes are to: Ø Examine the environmental issues and concerns associated with potential business activities proposed for financing Ø Identify, evaluate and manage the environmental risk and the associated financial implications arising from these issues and concerns Ø Enhance the credit/investment risk appraisal process Approach The following approaches have been used to enhance environmental risk management: Ø Banks should be able to ascertain risks arising out of environmental issues Ø The practice should be directed towards addressing the focused environmental problem that is causing the risks. It should not be used as a tool to solve problems in general Ø The practice needs to be value adding to the customer and should not be policing in......

Words: 2260 - Pages: 10

Premium Essay

Green Banking

...Administration Discipline Khulna University 4th November, 2013 Name of the proposed report: “Green Banking Initiative of Bangladesh bank and Compliance of the Commercial banks” (A Case study based on Khulna City) Introduction: Bangladesh is a country of enormous opportunities. After its liberation war, it has rapidly changed its economic status and in spite of so many obstacles, recently it has introduced itself as a middle income country. But now, along with other countries of the world, it is facing some problems like- global warming, excessive use of carbon-di-oxide and CFC gas, and also some other climatic change and all these are a great threat to our economy. The green banking concept is relatively new in Bangladesh and yet to get momentum. Actually green banking is nothing but the operations of the banking activities giving especial attention upon the social, ecological and environmental factors aiming at the conservation of nature and natural resources. Banks can be green through bringing changes in six main spheres of banking activities (Rahman, et al. 2013). Those are Change in Investment Management, Change in Deposit Management, Change in House Keeping, Change in the Process of Recruitment and Development of Human Capital, Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), and Making Consciousness Among Clients and General Mass (Rahman, et al. 2013). Green banking, as a concept, is proactive and smart way of thinking with a vision for future sustainability of......

Words: 4757 - Pages: 20

Premium Essay

Green Banking

...Introduction s environmental issues gain greater attention, pressure is being placed on all industries, including financial services to implement “green” initiatives. While green banking is not yet a key reason for most customers to select one financial institution over another, customer demands and greater environmental awareness are driving a number of financial institutions to go green. Environment is a key focus amongst ethical banks (in this field specially called sustainability or green banks) as well as amongst many conventional banks that wish to appear more ethically oriented or that see switching to more environmental practices to be to their advantage. In general bankers “consider themselves to be in a relatively environmentally friendly industry (in terms of emissions and pollution). However, given their potential exposure to risk, they have been surprisingly slow to examine the environmental performance of their clients. A stated reason for this is that such an examination would ‘require interference’ with a client’s activities. While the desire to not meddle in the business of the client is valid, one could also note that banks are required to interfere in the business of their clients regularly to ensure that the clients’ business plan is viable before issuing them a loan. The kind of analysis that all banks partake in is termed a single bottom line analysis (this analysis only considers financial performance). It is arguable whether or not performing a triple......

Words: 3636 - Pages: 15

Premium Essay

Green Banking

...Report On Green Management perspective In Bangladesh SOUTH EAST UNIVERSITY Submitted To  Farzana Ferdoushi Faculty, School of Business of SEU Submitted By  Mohammad Azmir hossain ID: 2010010000004 Department: B.B.A. Date of Submission March 8, 2014 Introduction Bangladesh is a country suffering from immense social, political, economic and environmental issues and these issues need to be addressed for the overall development of this country. However, we all know that the peoples of the whole world are concerned about the environmental degradation, especially the rising of global temperature and thereby melting of glaciers and ice-berg in the polar region and consequently rising of sea level, which will directly affect the low lying countries of the world like Bangladesh. The world conscious people are also concerned about the increase of Green House Gases and Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and thereby depletion of Ozone layer. As such, every person and especially the professionals must have greater role to check the environmental degradation. The contribution of the banking sector is playing significant role to save the environment through their CSR, investment or other activities. To save the environment, Green Management is the great initiative which is taken by bank all over the world. The word „Green Banking‟ is very common concept in the world. Global warming is a great issue in......

Words: 5340 - Pages: 22

Free Essay

Opportunity for Green Banking

...Green Banking Initiative: Opportunities for Bangladesh Dr. S M Ahsan Habib Professor and Director (Training & Research), BIBM The paper was presented at a seminar on Green Banking at BIBM on October 14, 2010 Green Banking Initiative: Opportunities for Bangladesh I. Introduction Banks that were once seen only as profit motive institutions have been adjusting to a more demanding market and to a more conscious society over last two decades. An increasing number of banks around the world are going green by providing innovative green products that cover financial services to support the activities that are not hazardous to environment and help conserve environment. A green bank is also called an ethical bank, a socially responsible bank, or a sustainable bank. The exact meaning of all these titles may not be same however they cover a lot of common activities and perceptions. At least, all these banks- in various ways and at different times- have engaged themselves in making a better future (Merzio 2007). The approach to green banking (GB) varies from bank to bank, however, broad objectives of green banks are to use their resources with responsibility avoiding waste and giving priority to environment and society. The public concern of the state of environment has been growing significantly in the last few years, mostly due to apparently unusual weather patterns, rising greenhouse gases,......

Words: 16618 - Pages: 67

Premium Essay

Customer Satisfaction on Green Banking

...Customer Satisfaction On Environmental Friendly Banking “Green banking” On Dutch Bangla bank ltd. Research Paper on Customer satisfaction On Environmental Friendly Banking “Green banking” On Dutch Bangla bank ltd. Submitted To: Dr. Bishwajit Chandra Deb Chairman of BBA Faculty Associate Professor Dept. of Accounting & Information Systems Comilla University, Comilla Submitted By: Kazi Ayesha Akter Class Id: 0906019 Batch: 4th Session: 2009-10 Dept. of Accounting and Information Systems Comilla University, Comilla Letter of Transmittal September 03,2014 Dr. Bishwajit Chandra Deb Chairman Associate Professor Dept. of Accounting & Information Systems Comilla University, Comilla Subject: Submission of Research Paper on The Customer satisfaction On Environmental Friendly Banking “Green banking” On Dutch Bangla bank ltd. Dear Sir, By the grace of almighty Allah, the benevolent and merciful, your solitary help, I have been successful to complete the research on the study of “Research Paper on The Customer satisfaction On Environmental Friendly Banking “Green banking” On Dutch Bangla bank.” that you have asked to prepare. I have tried our best to make the research within the given time period. Though my intention was strong to make the best research, unfortunately there may be some mistakes. I hope that you will consider my mistakes with mercifully. Therefore, I sincerely, expect that you would be kind enough to accept my research paper for evaluation and......

Words: 2965 - Pages: 12

Premium Essay

Green Banking Circular from Bangladesh Bank

...Website: www.bangladesh-bank.org www.bangladeshbank.org.bd www.bb.org.bd Banking Regulation & Policy Department Bangladesh Bank Head Office Dhaka February 27, 2011 BRPD Circular No.02 Date: ---------------------- Falgun 15, 1417 Chief Executives All Scheduled Banks in Bangladesh Policy Guidelines for Green Banking Introduction: We are aware that global warming is an issue that calls for a global response. The rapid change in climate will be too great to allow many eco-systems to suitably adapt, since the change have direct impact on biodiversity, agriculture, forestry, dry land, water resources and human health. Due to unusual weather pattern, rising greenhouse gas, declining air quality etc. society demands that business also take responsibility in safeguarding the planet. Green finance as a part of Green Banking makes great contribution to the transition to resource-efficient and low carbon industries i.e. green industry and green economy in general. Green banking is a component of the global initiative by a group of stakeholders to save environment. The state of environment in Bangladesh is rapidly deteriorating. The key areas of environmental degradation cover air pollution, water pollution and scarcity, encroachment of rivers, improper disposal of industrial medical and house-hold waste, deforestation, loss of open space and loss of biodiversity. In addition, Bangladesh is one of the most climate change vulnerable countries. In line with global...

Words: 2495 - Pages: 10

Premium Essay

Green Banking Practices of Commercial Banks in Bangladesh

...finance. Banking in the form in which it exists nowadays is comparatively of recent origin. Before the advent of modern banking, direct finance, where the owner of capital deals directly with the user of capital, was the customary mode of transference of funds from savers to investors. Now, banks are engaged in various functions i.e., receiving, collecting, transferring, paying, lending, investing, dealing, exchanging, and servicing money and claims to money both locally and internationally. Bangladesh is a country suffering from immense social, political, economic and environmental issues and these issues need to be addressed for the overall development of this country. However, we all know that the people of the whole world are concerned about the environmental degradation, especially the rising of global temperature and thereby melting of glaciers and ice-berg in the polar region and consequently rising of sea level, which will directly affect the low lying countries of the world like Bangladesh. The world conscious people are also concerned about the increase of Green House Gases and Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and thereby depletion of Ozone layer. As such, every person and especially the professionals must have greater role to check the environmental degradation. The contribution of the banking sector is playing significant role to save the environment through their CSR, investment or other activities. 1.2 Scope of the Study: A banker or a banking......

Words: 17335 - Pages: 70

Premium Essay

Green Banking

...Bottom of Form Email Sent! You have successfully emailed the post. Green Banking For Small Businesses Tim Chen, NerdWallet | Sep. 6, 2011, 9:07 PM | 635 | In an increasingly eco-conscious market, many small businesses are finding creative ways to go green. Whether it’s improving their energy efficiency, buying organic products, composting or just turning off electronics at night, being green means all sorts of things to different people. One small thing you may not have considered is green banking. Most banks have at least one green initiative in place (or claim to), and a few have made the extra effort to distinguish themselves as green businesses. But what does “green banking” mean exactly? Depending on whom you ask, it’s a marketing term, a social philosophy, an investment strategy, and everything in between. However, if you’re an entrepreneur, you probably want to know if it makes sense on a business level. The answer is yes! You’ll save money, you’ll help the planet, and if you’re already running a green business, it’s a great next step. That said, if you’re serious about getting a greener banking experience, you’re going to have to look at facts, not fluff. What is your bank really doing to be more environmentally friendly? Have they cut back on their paper and energy use? Do they invest in sustainable or green businesses? Do they give back to the local community in any way, or give money to charity? You don’t need to do that much digging to get......

Words: 880 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Green Banking

...TERM PAPER ON GREEN BANKING AND ITS PRACTICES IN BANGLADESH Submitted to: Mrs.Dipannita Battacharjee Assistant Professor Department of Marketing Studies University of Chittagong Submitted By: M.Ariful Aziz Kanon 4th Year, BBA (Hons.) ID-07304020 Session: 2006-2007 Department of Marketing Studies University of Chittagong. Date of Submission: …… July 2012 Introduction: Green Banking is no more new concept in today`s world.The concept of Green is to minimize environmental degradation and making this planet habitable and its being used in Banking sector which is presently known as Green Banking.The concept of Green Banking was developed in the western countries. Green Banking is a general term, which can cover a multitude of areas from a bank being environmentally friendly to how and also where their money is invested. Green Banking refers and emphases on environmental-friendly practices and reducing carbon footprint from banking activities. A green bank is a bank that promotes environmental and social responsibility but operates as a traditional community bank and provides excellent services to investors and clients. Its progressive approach to the community and the earth makes it different from the crowd. A green bank is also called ethical bank, environmentally responsible bank, socially responsible bank, or a sustainable bank, and is expected to consider all the social and environmental......

Words: 6855 - Pages: 28

Premium Essay

Green Banking

...Green banking: Future important issue for banking industry Md. Aminul Islam The scientific name of environmental study is Ecology. More specifically if we define Environmental study or Ecology it means "the scientific study of relation of plants and living organisms to each other and their surroundings." We know this planet "Earth" is the only green planet created by Allah Subhanu Taala. Now, this planet is in danger due to over exploitation and greediness of the humanity. All other fauna and flora are also in danger and already many species have disappeared from this planet due to rapid change of ecosystem. The term Green Banking is now popular worldwide now-a-days. It is for stopping the environmental degradation and making this planet habitable. The concept of Green Banking developed in the western countries, which has been replicated by many developing countries. It means the eco-friendly or environment-friendly banking and it also refers to ethical banking or sustainable banking. We all know that the peoples of the whole world are concerned about the environmental degradation, especially the rising of global temperature and thereby melting of glaciers and ice-berg in the polar region and consequently rising of sea level, which will directly affect the low lying countries of the world. The world conscious people are also concerned about the increase of Green House Gases and Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and thereby depletion of Ozone layer. As such, every person and......

Words: 1294 - Pages: 6