Premium Essay

Global Production Network Impact on Developing Countries

In: Social Issues

Submitted By daredmoon
Words 2460
Pages 10
Standard Front Page for 48-hours essay, Methodological
Workshop (5 ECTS) and synopsis
Compulsory use for all 48-hours’ essays, Methodological Workshop (5 ECTS) and Synopses on the following subjects:
• International Develoment Studies
• Global Studies
• Erasmus Mundus, Global Studies – A European Perspective
• Public Administration
• Social Science
• EU-studies
• Public Administration, MPA
Course title:
International Development
Kind of assignment (48-hours essay, Methodological Workshop (5 ECTS) and synopsis):
48-hours essay
Question number:
1
Student’s name:
Edda Maria von Wildenradt
Study card no./Birthday:
51970
Keystrokes/characters including spaces (Please look at the supplementary provisions for maximum-value):
14359
Submission date:
03-06-2015
Roskilde Universitet
Den samfundsvidenskabelige bacheloruddannelse
2
In the following essay I will address some specific issues in the global South that are influenced by international trade and trade regulation. This essay will provide a critical perspective on how international trade and trade regulations function and by this rise following questions: Which consequences have the international trade and trade regulation had in the given periods? Who benefits from the international trade and trade regulation? And lastly, is international trade and trade regulation only designed to benefit one part of the world - the
West?
Why are some people rich and some poor? This question raises a debate with several of arguments of why that is. Some people believe it to be due to the poor’s behaviour and others sees it as a result of the relationship between the poor and the rich (O’Brian & Williams 2014:
43). I do not believe that poor people’s behavior is the one to blame. I think we need to go back in time and see what marks…...

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