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Genitourinary Clinical Case

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Genitourinary Clinical Case
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Genitourinary Clinical Case Genitourinary diseases or (STDs) are infections that are passed through sexual contacts with infected persons (Gross, 2011), they are also known as venereal diseases. Currently, there are more than twenty types of STDs. These are either caused by viruses, parasites or bacteria. Some of them are; Syphilis, Gonorrhea, Genital Herpes, HIV/AIDS, Chlamydia, Trichomoniasis and HPV (Barlow, 2011). Most of these genitourinary diseases affect both genders, but they have been known to cause severe health problems in women than in men. For instance, if an expectant mother catches STDs, this can have serious health implications for the infant (Iannini, 2003). Genitourinary diseases that are caused by parasites or bacteria are treatable by use of antibiotics and other types of medicines. Those that are caused by viruses are untreatable; currently there is no cure for them (Markos, 2003). Drugs sometimes control STDs caused by viruses. Also correct and consistent use of latex condoms significantly reduces chances of contracting an STD even though they are not a hundred percent effective (Pattman, 2010). Initially, most genitourinary infections do not have symptoms. This fact poses a greater risk of infecting others. Some symptoms of these diseases might include; discharges both vaginal and penile, pelvic pain and pimple like ulcers around the genitals (Miller, 2003). In women, STIs acquired before conception may result in serious health implications for the baby. Sometimes it is hard for women who had STIs to become pregnant (Rogstad, 2011). Approximately 30 different parasites, bacteria and viruses can cause STIs. A perfect example of genitourinary infection caused by parasites is Trichomoniasis, those caused by bacteria include; Chlamydia, syphilis, gonorrhea and others (Watkins, 2011). The worst type of STIs is those that are caused by viruses; these include Genital warts, genital herpes, and HIV/AIDS. Most of these are passed through sexual contact. There are others that can be spread without sexual intercourse; these are spread through breastfeeding, contact with contaminated tissues and blood and during childbirth (Walzman, 2005). STIs are easily diagnosed by laboratory tests involving blood and urine samples while others are diagnosed through screening. Abstinence is not the most efficient way of preventing genitourinary infections. Vaccination may also help in preventing certain infections including some classes of HPV and hepatitis B (Barlow, 2011). Adoption of safer practices such being faithful to your sexual partner, correct and consistent condoms use substantially reduces the risk of contracting STIs. It is worrying that recently a particular type of antibiotic resistance gonorrhea has developed (Gross, 2011). This development calls for a contingent approach by medical practitioners and scientist in conducting further studies that might be fruitful in discovering a treatment for this type of gonorrhea. Otherwise, this disease will be the leading cause of death in the world more and particularly in the developing countries. Depending on the type of infection, most STIs are easily transmitted through the mucous membranes. These membranes are those of the vulva, penis, eyes, urinary tract, mouth, throat, rectum and respiratory tract (Markos, 2003). The skin and mucous membranes differ considerably in that mucous membranes allow some pathogens that cause infections to pass through into the body. To prevent infections doctors recommend that new sexual partners must always undergo tests and screening to diagnose if they have any of these diseases (Miller, 2003). Genitourinary problems are regarded as infections when they enter into the body, during this period they are asymptomatic. When they develop full symptoms, it is when they are referred to as a disease, during this time STDs have serious health implications on the patient’s body (Walzman, 2005). As a way of developing a holistic care plan for patients with STDs, I recommend that these patients should always consult a doctor when further symptoms or signs occur. This action will go a long way in helping to prevent serious health complications that result from the risk factors of STDs (Barlow, 2011). Again, it is critical that patients with STDs must observe the usage of drugs that doctors and other medical practitioners have administered unto them. It is also important that STDs patients must keep dietary needs and balance as most the drugs used in the treatment of STDs have serious side effects on the human body (Gross, 2011).The side effects of these medications can only be minimized by uptake of proper food with balanced nutrition. Also, all partners must partake to using latex condoms each and every time they are engaging in sexual intercourse. Correct and consistent use of condoms helps reduce the risk of contracting STIs infections (Iannini, 2003). In this 21st century, it is high time that doctors and other medical experts come out and enlighten the society about STIs. Many deaths have that have resulted from STDs could have been prevented if the patients received proper medical care and had access to information relating to STDs. All in all, it is an individual’s responsibility to avoid risk factors that could make them contract these deadly STDs. In conclusion, it’s worrying and traumatic to find out that you are infected with an STI. Between extremes, an STI can cause serious medical complications and death even with the best medical care (Rogstad, 2011). Trust among the uninfected and psychosocial support for the infected to overcome trauma are highly recommended.
References
Barlow, D. (2011). Sexually transmitted infections (3rd ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Canadian guidelines on sexually transmitted infections. (2008). Ottawa: Public Health Agency of Canada.
Gross, G. (2011). Sexually transmitted infections and sexually transmitted diseases. Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag.
Iannini, P. (2003). Contemporary diagnosis and management of urinary tract infections (Premiere ed.). Newtown, Pa.: Handbooks in Health Care.
Markos, A. (2003). Self-obtained samples for genitourinary infections. Sexually Transmitted Infections, 171-171.
Miller, R. (2003). Chaperoning in genitourinary medicine clinics. Sexually Transmitted Infections.
Pattman, R. (2010). Oxford Handbook of Genitourinary Medicine, HIV, and sexual health (2nd ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Rogstad, K. (2011). ABC of sexually transmitted infections (Sixth ed.). Chichester, West Sussex: BMJ Books.
Walzman, M. (2005). Foundation training and genitourinary medicine. Sexually Transmitted Infections, 99-99.
Watkins, H. (2011). Sexually transmitted infections. Detroit: Greenhaven Press.…...

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