Free Essay

Forces Behind Us-Mexico Immigration

In: Social Issues

Submitted By synlol
Words 364
Pages 2
The driving forces behind U.S.-Mexico migration from 1900 to 1945 was the necessity of cheap and ‘unskilled’ labor, circular migration, importation-deportation and institutional involvement. What we see in the early 1900s is that the Mexican immigrant population was exploited as a source of flexible, low-cost labor that could be imported and deported freely. This meant that when the U.S. required more sources of cheap labor, they would import Mexican workers and deport them when the labor was no longer needed. This led to this form of circular migration where Mexican immigrants were brought over during WW I when we needed labor and then deported during the Great Depression followed by importation during WW II when the U.S. required more workers due to another labor shortage. This led to institutional involvement from the U.S. Department of State, Labor, and Justice, which formed the Braceros Program. This allowed for the temporary importation of contract laborers from Mexico to the U.S.
I believe that of all these forces, the importation and deportation of cheap and ‘unskilled’ labor played the biggest role in creating and shaping Mexican migration to the United States. What we see with this trend of importing and deporting Mexicans is that the U.S. brings in and removes Mexican immigrants when they are no longer beneficial. This seems to be the primary theme in which Mexican migration was built upon. Mexicans were viewed as cheap and unskilled labor brought in to work in the factories and fields, which can be considered to be undesirable jobs. This is evident with the Barcero Program, which recruited 178,000 Braceros from 1942-1945 and significantly increased the contracts it extended to over 5 million from 1945-1965. In a sense this mirrors the views in which many people see Mexican immigrants today. I believe that this is where the stereotypical misconception that Mexican immigrants are ‘unskilled’ and are capable of cheap labor was birthed. Although this is not necessarily the case, I think that Mexican migration in the past as well as today was a direct result of the government freely importing and deporting immigrants as they please.…...

Similar Documents

Premium Essay

Is the Mexico Us Border Fence Justified

...Is The Mexico-US border fence justified? The United States Congress approved the "Secure Fence Act of 2006" which sanctioned the construction of numerous separation barricades at the Mexican-American border and the installation of a virtual fence entailing surveillance cameras, sensors, and other equipment to cover those parts of the border that do not have a physical wall. The debate is related to the American debate on immigration, and controversies about the fence centre on its effectiveness, expense, representational value, and more. How accurate however, is the claim that the Mexico-US border fence is justified? The main argument for the preservation of the Mexico-US border fence is economic. It is claimed that illegal immigrants drain the benefits system leaving less money to be spent on other areas such as health care and reforms. It is a common misconception that Mexican immigrants do low paid unskilled work which the majority of American citizens are unwilling to undertake. However these facts are disputed by the writer Steven Camarota who states ‘Of the 465 civilian occupations, only four are majority immigrants. These four occupations account for less than 1 per cent of the total U.S. workforce. Moreover, native-born Americans comprise 47 per cent of workers in these occupations.’ Drug trafficking and the resultant violence in Northern Mexico is a real problem for the United States and for the Mexicans themselves. However by constructing a fence which has been......

Words: 1312 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

Driving Forces Behind Pepsico

...Driving Forces Behind PepsiCo The management team at PepsiCo is the driving force behind the company’s growth and community involvement. They focus on being responsible corporate citizens, performance with purpose. Their goal is to have financial success while leaving a positive impact on society. The approach to financial performance is simple, increase shareholder value. By focusing on social and environmental issues they are able to achieve both their mission and their vision. The mission statement for PepsiCo is: Our mission is to be the world’s premier consumer products company focused on convenient foods and beverages. We seek to produce financial rewards to investors as we provide opportunities for growth and enrichment to our employee, our business partners and the communities in which we operate. And in everything we do, we strive for honesty, fairness and integrity. (PepsiCo, 2013) The vision statement for PepsiCo is: PepsiCo’s responsibility is to continually improve all aspects of the world in which we operate – environment, social, economic – creating a better tomorrow than today. Our vision is put into action through programs and a focus on environmental stewardship, activities to benefit society, and a commitment to build shareholder value by making PepsiCo a truly sustainable company. (PepsiCo, 2013) Purpose of study. The purpose of this study is to determine what makes PepsiCo successful. The downfalls of PepsiCo management will also be......

Words: 2607 - Pages: 11

Free Essay

Immigration Us Politics

...tribal government partners to reduce illegal activity on tribal lands, and strengthen training on civil rights and civil liberties for DHS immigration officers.  Crack down on criminal networks engaging in passport and visa fraud and human smuggling. - Creates tough criminal penalties for trafficking in passports and immigration documents and schemes to defraud, including those who prey on vulnerable immigrants through notario fraud. It also strengthens penalties to combat human smuggling rings. Progress Strengthening Border Security  Doubling boots on the ground. - Today, the Border Patrol is better staffed than ever before, having doubled the number of agents from approximately 10,000 in 2004 to more than 21,000 in 2011. More than 2,200 Border Patrol agents man the Northern border, a 700 percent increase since 9/11. More than 21,000 Customs and Border Protection Officers, including 3,800 along Northern Border, manage the flow of people and goods at our ports of entry and crossings.  Stepping up surveillance. - For the first time, DHS unmanned aerial capabilities now cover the entire Southwest border, from California to Texas, providing critical aerial surveillance assistance to personnel on the ground. DHS has also completed 649 miles of fencing out of nearly 652 miles planned.  Enhancing investigative resources. - Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), the investigative arm of DHS, has increased the number of Federal agents deployed on the Southwest......

Words: 1007 - Pages: 5

Free Essay

Fencing at the Us Mexico Boarder

...Is fencing at the U.S.-Mexico border an effective immigration policy? Although the fence will channel the illegal immigrants to the areas where border patrol can seize them, it is not an effective immigration policy. The fence is not able to keep illegal immigrants from going around it, climbing over it, or digging under it; furthermore, it only covers one-third of the border. The US Mexico border is roughly 2,000 miles long. The fence, constructed by The Department of Homeland Security, is 18 feet high, 700 miles long, and built mostly near urban areas. A fence alone is not the solution because there are so many ways to overcome the obstacle, going to the areas not fenced, vehicle smuggling, and climbing. The other accessible way around the fence is to dig under it. Global Security.org has sited 40 tunnels were being burrowed under the fence between 2001 and 2006. The main reason I believe the reason the fencing is not an effective immigration policy is because there is not the manpower to monitor all the fence points. There is no way to have all the people needed 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to make sure no one is entering our country illegally. What draws these immigrants to make such a risk to cross the border into the United States? They believe they can make more money to send to their families in Mexico. They also believe, because we are a free country, we have more to offer them than their county. We are “the land of the free, home of the brave.”......

Words: 562 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Immigration in the Us

...One of today’s biggest issues in America is immigration. We are receiving more immigrants than any other time in history. Immigration affects every aspect of life in America. Many illegal immigrants are migrating to the U.S every year and raising our population. Immigration has an impact on education, health care, government budgets, employment, the environment, and crime. Some migrate for better life and opportunities in America. Many of these immigrants come undocumented. New Mexico has the highest percent of immigrants that migrate. In 2004, 175,364 people migrated to the United States illegally. This is a sign of how open our borders are. There are not enough people securing it. When immigrants are caught, they’re held in jail until they can be deported by to their country of birth. New Mexico’s border security is a big national security problem. New Mexico shares a border with 4 states- Arizona, Colorado, Oklahoma, and Texas. Most of your constituents are from New Mexico. According to President Obama, there is not enough staff to secure the borders and limited supplies to help protect it. This plays a big role in illegal immigration. To reduce the amount of illegal immigrants that migrate to America, companies that employ undocumented immigrants should be punished. This means in order for an immigrant to be employed, they must be documented. You would know if the immigrant was legal or not by matching the info provided on the paperwork to the......

Words: 934 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Us Immigration

...The US Immigration Law of Arizona - A In the United States of America, you can experience a lot of immigration, just like you do here in Denmark. But it is very different compared from us in Denmark to the United States. Is it very strict to cross the border and come over to America. And why is it so? Is it because the government and the borders don’t tolerate that everyone just come in to the land and do what ever they want. And actually I think that is absolutely fair, because you can’t just wander around and do what you like, that is now how the system works. The border patrol in Arizona has got some new laws, for themselves actually, which makes the capable of asking pedestrians who might seem strange. If the border patrol thinks that there is something fishy about the person they spot, they are allowed to ask for ID to see if the person actually lives in the US, and are not from Mexico, Guatemala etc. When I’m talking about immigration from Mexico and Guatemala, I’m talking about Illegal Immigration. Illegal immigration to the United States, also referred to in the media as undocumented immigration, is the act by foreign nationals of entering the United States without government permission. And now we come the biggest question: Why are their so many immigrants heading over to the United States? There are actually many reasons and explanations to this and I will comment on some of them. Overpopulation is just one of them. The reason behind this is because that...

Words: 1043 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Immigration in the Us

...Immigration in the United States Today people are wondering why the government is allowing immigrants to come to the United States when there are not enough jobs for the citizens currently here. Even though immigration can take jobs away from potential citizens, immigration can bring needed talent to the United States and can better a person’s life. Currently with immigration there is a lot of anti-immigrant sentiment, and lack of major immigration reform. Some immigrants are asylum seekers, while others are looking for a better life. There are benefits to immigration such as population growth and diversity. People here in America are having trouble finding jobs and are looking towards immigration as the primary reason why. They are wanting the politicians that were elected to choose a side; for immigration or against immigration. This question is part of a huge debate currently raging all across America. People all across America want the United States government to shut down the borders and to deport all of the current illegal immigrants here. As of March 2010, illegal immigrants account for about 11.2 million people currently in the United States (Passel, 2011). Anti-immigration attitudes generally come out when it is harder to find jobs and less when jobs are readily available. Anti-immigrant campaigns blame immigrants for the current job losses and declining wages, as well as higher crime rates and public health crisis (Barry, 2005). A lot of the backlash has to do......

Words: 1531 - Pages: 7

Premium Essay

Immigration Issues in the Us

...Immigration Issues in the US America is a nation of “rights.” In the past 50 years, the United States has had to contend with virtually every rights movement imaginable: civil rights, students’ rights, abortion rights, disabilities rights, gun ownership rights, women’s rights, homosexual rights, victims’ rights, and now immigrant’s rights (Bean, 1990). One of the most controversial political issues today is illegal immigrants from Mexico entering our country (Hannity, 2007). Illegal immigration into the United States is a problem that should be a concern, as it is unfair to both Americans and to the people of this country who legally immigrated (Light, 1993). Immigration in the United States is growing out of control. Each year more and more illegally immigrants filter into our country. Scientific research has proven that we cannot continue to take in all these illegal immigrants (Bean, 1990). The question is whether we should learn to accept illegal immigrants and grant them their wish, or send them back to their home and try to stop illegal immigration once and for all. During the 1980’s, the Unites States received about 8 million immigrants, approximately 800,000 per year (Wilson, 1990). That included both legal admissions and illegal entrants who later received amnesty and legal residence. The volume has increased in the 1990’s, with about 900,000 immigrants arriving each year (Light, 1993). Over the past 30 years, the source countries of these......

Words: 1394 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

Drug Trafficking in Mexico and Us

...of Drug Trafficking and Immigration in Mexico and United States Immigration and drug trafficking are a menace in the entire world. In dealing with issues concerning immigration and abuse of drugs, it is vital to note that these two phenomena go hand in hand. Drug trafficking refers to a worldwide unlawful trade that involves the crop growing, manufacturing, circulation and selling of substances that have issues with drug prevention regulations. On the other hand, immigration refers to the settling in a foreign nation state permanently. Drug traffickers deal with drugs such as cocaine, heroin, cannabis, and opiates. The illegal immigrants find it hard to survive in a new environment due to financial constraints. Hence, these immigrants engage in illegal activities for example abuse of drugs and substances. Similarly, they engage in entering into other countries illegal that is a crime activity too (Bankston). Due to poverty and poor governance in Mexico, it has led to the rapidly settling of individuals in the United States and Canada. This process of settling is normally illegal since it does not follow the right channels of attaining documents from the required authorities that allow a foreigner to live in their country. The illegal immigration in the Central America to the Northern continent has led to the development of a mechanism known as North American Free Trade Agreement. With it is acronym as NAFTA, enacted in 1994 by United States, Mexico, and Canada. The aim......

Words: 1280 - Pages: 6

Free Essay

Us Immigration

...Effect Of the US Immigration Bill 2013 On the American And Indian Economy Executive Summary Eight U.S. senators from the Republican and Democratic parties have submitted a new bill,i.e., the US Immigration Bill 2013, to overhaul the immigration system, with a focus on immigrant work skills and improved border security. The proposed legislation is 844 pages long.  Under the new proposal, the cap on H-1B visas would nearly double from 65,000 to 110,000, and could rise to 180,000 if certain conditions are met. Spouses of people holding H-1B visas would be given the right to work and they would not count against the cap on H 1-B visas, if in turn, their country of origin allows the spouses of U.S. nationals working in that country to hold employment.  The Americans feel the top H-1B and L-1 employers are using the programme to substitute tens of thousands of high-wage, high skilled American jobs and give them to non-Americans. The bill proposes that a company that employs 50 or more employees in the United States may not hire additional H-1B or L-visa employees if the number of such employees exceeds: (1) 75% of the total number of employees for FY2015, (2) 65% of the total number of employees for FY2016, and (3) 50% of the total number of employees for each subsequent fiscal year. These provisions are seen as directly targeting Indian information technology companies. While the U.S. operations of these companies form a large percentage of their revenue, the......

Words: 2094 - Pages: 9

Free Essay

Immigration in the Us

...Immigration in the United States Calculated circa 2005, over 3% of the human population is comprised of immigrants, a term used to describe those who move to a different country for permanent residency. (Wilcox 1) For purposes varying from severe needs to wanderlust, migration levels rise each year all across the globe. Throughout the past century, the notion of immigration has been negatively perceived and become a controversial matter in the eyes of the United States law enforcement. Our country’s oppression against immigration has come to the exceedingly unethical extent where political figures like Presidential Candidate Rep. Tom Tancredo erroneously claim that “our ‘War at Home’ against illegal immigrants is more deadly than the war with Iraq”. (Sampson 2) Such prevalent negative outlooks and claims on immigration have guided a majority of our population to have inaccurate preconceptions of those who migrate into our country, wrongfully influencing our population to correlate immigration levels with higher rates of violence and crime. In this paper, I, with help from writings by authors Shelley Wilcox and Robert J. Sampson, will help disprove the stereotypes our nation puts upon immigrants, and propose ethical methods for our country’s approach on immigration laws. Firstly, the accusation that immigrants are more often affiliated in acts of crime and violence as compared to non-immigrants must be disproved. In fact, recent studies have proved this stereotype to be......

Words: 952 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Us/Mexico Border

...imported large number of Mexicans workers (mostly farmworkers). This program came about because of farm labor shortages caused by American entry into World War 11. The men were recruited to work primarily in agriculture, although during World War II braceros also supplied railroad labor. The majority of the braceros were experienced farm labors from important agricultural regions of Mexico. Huge numbers of bracero candidates arrived by train to the northern border. Their arrival altered the social environment and economy of many border towns. The program brought Mexican workers to replace American workers dislocated by the war. The program was intended to be temporary, but because of dependence of American farms on Mexican labor it kept going for nearly two decades after the war. The braceros contracts were controlled by independent associations and the Farm Bureau. The contracts were in English and the braceros would sign them without understanding theor full rights and the conditions of employment. When the contracts expired, the braceros were required to turn in their permits and return to México. The braceros could return to their native lands in case of an emergency, only with written permission from their boss. Despite the braceros contribution to the United States economy, the braceros suffered harassment, discrimination, and oppression from extremist groups and racial authorities. The braceros were forced to work under unsafe conditions, and forced to accept......

Words: 994 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Export of Us Dairy to Mexico

...There are many indicators that lead us to the conclusion that Mexico is a good potential market for U.S. Dairy products. Population is growing, which will lead to a larger market. The growth of Real GDP and GDP per capita will allow the buyer to buy more which will increase the consumption of Dairy products per head; the consumption of more expensive Dairy products will increase as well due to urbanization. The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) is one of the dominating factors of trade between U.S. and Mexico. Without having to pay tariffs, U.S. importers can afford to have prices for their products lower than other counties`. Infrastructure, communications and government regulations also tolerate U.S. import of Dairy products to Mexico. And last but not least, the existing gap between production and consumption of Dairy products in Mexico indicates the country`s urging need for imports. U.S. Dairy In 2010, U.S. exports of cheese, total whey products, lactose and other dairy products were valued at $3.71 billion, up 63 percent from the prior year. Export volume totaled 3.04 billion lbs. of U.S. milk solids, up 40 percent from 2009. Mexico ($823 million export value in 2010), Southeast Asia ($693 million, up 141 percent over 2009) and Canada ($436 million) remained the largest destinations for U.S. dairy products. In 2010, 12.8 percent of U.S. milk production (on a total-solids basis) was sold overseas. Dairy Products: 1) Cheese America is a nation......

Words: 3151 - Pages: 13

Premium Essay

Cultral Differences Between Mexico & the Us

...cultural Difference Between Mexico & the united states 1 | CULTURAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN MEXICO & THE UNITED STATES | | | | | | | | cultural Difference Between Mexico & the united STATES 2 ABC Porcelain Textile firm is expanding, and the need to increase productivity has been overwhelming. However, the cost to produce in the United States has showed a negative impact on the overall profit. In order to reach our goal of providing quality products, management has decided to explore manufacturing efforts in Mexico. In order to accomplish this goal, management has selected a team to go to Mexico and devise a plan of action. This assign has presented itself with many challenges. The assigned team members or I are familiar with the conditions or culture of Mexico. Therefore, extensive training will be needed to make this expansion lucrative and rewarding for the company. Our primary goal for this assignment is to become acquainted with the culture of Mexico by reviewing the culture, values, beliefs, and religion. In addition, to aid with the learning process, we will apply the skills outlined under the scholarly work of Geert Hofstede dimensions. We will them examine cultural dimensions that appear to stumbling blocks for us, and devise a plan of action to overcome the cultural differences. Since this is the first operation of possible expansion, we have determined that it would be feasible to employee a Mexican citizen that is......

Words: 1231 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Arms Trafficking in Us and Mexico

...Trafficking between the United States and Mexico: The Drug Trafficking Nexus Transnational Crime and Globalization By: Katrina T. Mason May 2, 2008 The United States is quite known for their proactive stances on the “War on Drugs”, “War on Terror”, and “War in Iraq”. Some view them as the international police and others view them as the international fiend, but it is in no doubt that the United States takes a very active stance in fighting what they believe is evil and wrong within the world. This is increasingly true for the evils that occur within its own borders such as the continued drug epidemic, domestic violence, child abuse, poverty, gangs, and prostitution (with the exception of Nevada). Unfortunately though, the United States’ stance on legal activities crossing from their own governance into neighboring states where the activity is illegal is not held with the same level of concern or dedication. A primary example of this double standard can be seen on the Mexican-United States border. This is not in reference to the debris from the giant wall being built on the Mexican border falling to the southern side, the young Americans fleeing across the borders to intoxicate themselves, or even the revolution of McDonalds springing up in towns throughout Mexico; but instead to the small arms and light weapons trafficking continually flowing down from the border states into Mexico causing alarming murder rates,......

Words: 8003 - Pages: 33