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Basic Principles and Functions of Electrical Machines
O.I. Okoro, Ph.D.1*, M.U. Agu, Ph.D.1, and E. Chinkuni, Ph.D.2
1

Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Enugu State, Nigeria * E-mail: oiokoro@hotmail.com
2

Polytechnic University of Namibia, Windhoek, Namibia E-mail: chikuni@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT Recent advances in power electronics and highspeed microprocessors have led to considerable attention in electrical machines with regard to their applications in industrial drives. This paper brings to the fore, various types of electrical machines, their operations, and applications, as well as the method of determining their parameters. Various ways of protecting electric machines against overloads and mechanical faults are also highlighted. It is anticipated that the work presented in this paper will be of immense benefit to practicing engineers especially in areas of machine design, maintenance, and protection.
(Keywords: electrical machines, operation design, maintenance, protection, stator)

the stator and alternating currents are induced in the rotor by transformer action. In the synchronous machine, direct current is supplied to the rotor and Alternating Current (A.C.) flows in the stator. On the other hand, a D.C. machine is a machine that is excited from D.C. sources only or that itself acts as a source of D.C. [5]. It is a common practice in industry to employ A.C. motors whenever they are inherently suitable or can be given appropriate characteristics by means of power electronics devices. Yet, the increasing complexity of industrial processes demands greater flexibility from electrical machines in terms of special characteristics and speed control. It is in this field that the D.C. machines, fed from the A.C. supply through rectifiers, are making their mark. In this paper, we shall discuss the various types of electric machines,…...

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