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Durkheim and Marx

In: Social Issues

Submitted By kendra950
Words 468
Pages 2
4 February 2013
Durkheim and Marx Throughout time sociology has been created and built upon. It has been edited and revised over and over again and even though there’s more that needs to be worked on and more bricks to be added, some credit has to be given to two of the many people who laid the first bricks, Karl Marx and Emile Durkheim. Knowing each one of their point of views is important to understand them and how they are similar and how they differ. Marx focused on class division and how it shapes society. He focused on the business aspects and how children grow up to be like their parents. If a child is born into a family who lives off welfare, then they are most likely going to be on welfare. Marx opinion on the working class was as quoted in the article, written by Shaun Best, “Working-class people are said to hold values, ideas and beliefs about the nature of inequality.” (49). He states that the more money a person has, the more power they have in a society. He found that they separate themselves from other classes. Durkheim didn’t just focus on the business aspects but took it further out on the people. Durkheim was a functionalist. “Durkheim argued that we should treat social facts as things.” (Best) (17). That quote means we need to study sociology as if it were an object we can dissect. The working class makes up 99% of the society and people have the choices to conform or not to conform to the ways of the society. He really studied suicide and the many different reasons people do it. Durkheim impacted us just as much as Marx in some similar and some different ways. Now knowing how they both started the foundation, how they compare and contrast is good to think about. They were similar because they both dealt with how people are what they grow up with but they are different because Marx focuses on business and Durkheim focused on every…...

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