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Does Salt Effect the Boiling Point of Water

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Submitted By jasonwalthour
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Does Salt effect the Boiling Temperature of Water?
By Jason

Project Design Plan

Water freezes at 32°F and boils at 212 °F. Dissolved substances such as salt lower the freezing point of water. This is why salt is sprinkled over icy pavement or wet roads in winter. It causes the temperature of the water to reach less that 32°F to form ice. Does it also have an effect on the boiling point of water? Does the quantity of salt added effect the boiling point? My experiment is to find out what effects salt will have on the temperature of boiling water. The hypothesis of my experiment is that if I add more salt then the temperature of the boiling water will increase. I believe the more salt added to the water the higher the boiling temperature is going to be. I will be using 2 cups of water as a base in a 2 quart stainless steel pot. I will add 1 tsp of salt, 2 tsp of salt and 4 tsp of salt and measure the temperature of the water.

Literature Review

If you heat up two pots of water one with tap water and one with tap water and 20 percent salt water, the pot with the salt water will boil before the pot without salt water. The heat capacity of water is higher than salt water. This means that it takes less energy to increase the temperature of salt water than it does unsalted water. Thus salt water warms up quicker and gets to a boiling point faster than unsalted water. (Dammann, 2013)
Dissolving table salt into water will lower the overall vapour pressure of the combined two elements. Lower vapor pressure means that the combined water and salt will have to be heated longer than water without salt to get it to vaporize. In Bradley’s experiment he used 2 gallons of distilled water and boiled it. He compared it to 2 gallons of water with 1/4 cup, 1/2 cup and 1 cup of salt. In his experiment Bradley showed that it took longer to boil water with…...

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