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Democracy in the Uk

In: Business and Management

Submitted By bubs123
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TO WHAT EXTENT IS UK DEMOCRACY SUFFERING FROM A PARTICIPATORY CRISIS?
In recent years there has been growing concern that British democracy is now suffering from a participatory crisis with dramatically falling levels of political participation. Whether it’s from decreasing voter turnout or decreasing numbers in party membership. In my opinion I believe that the UK is suffering quite a large crisis.
The first reason to suggest that Britain is in a crisis is if we look at recent voter turnout. In the 2010 and 2015 General Election the voter turnout was between 65-66%. This is considered as a crisis because in contrast to the election in the 1970’s the turnout was about 80%. It is a crisis because voter turnout has been decreasing over the years. The problem with lower voter turnout is that it becomes harder for the government to make decisions that would be more representative. When there is low voter turnout the government’s decisions are mainly based upon the people that voted. This would result in a large minority being left out and unrepresented in the process. Furthermore, it is considered a crisis because it also highlights the fact that UK citizens aren’t politically active. This means that less people are engaging with politics and are less aware with what is happening in their country. On the other hand, others may argue that the figure is relatively high and will improve overtime. This is because in the 2005 General Election the turnout was 60%. They would use this to suggest that voter turnout isn’t evidence to suggest UK is in a crisis as more than half the population are politically active.…...

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