Premium Essay

Black Women and Hiv

In: Social Issues

Submitted By bennettbelle10
Words 832
Pages 4
Ciara S. Lawrence
April 17, 2011
Research Paper (Draft)
Professor Jeffries

Introduction:
HIV/AIDS is an epidemic that has become widely spread in the United States which has become a major public health issue around the world. There are around 1.2 million people living with HIV/AIDS and 400,000 new cases every year.[] In the U.S. today women make up more than 300,000 of the 1.2 million people with HIV/AIDS.[] Being that AIDS is the leading cause of death in black people throughout the U.S.. Black people make up 13 percent of the population, but 65 percent of new HIV/AIDS cases. Whereas black women are still dispportionate infected for more than sixty-six percent of HIV/AIDS cases in the country with a rate of infection fifteen times higher than white women and four times higher than Latinas. Considering the aforementioned, it is not difficult to conclude that most of the new cases pinpoint a major disparity between black women and women of other races. Cultural environmental and other factors that exacerbate the problem are high numbers of black men going to prison, the effects of the black church and the lack of government resources. In my research paper, I will identify the causes of HIV/AIDS and suggest solutions to prevent the spread of this disease among black woman. According to Mayo Clinic the definition of Human immunodeficiency virus is a virus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in which the immune system in the body begins to fail causing life-threatening opportunistic infections and cancers to increase. Scientist has spent numerous of hours and millions of dollars to find a cure for this infection but nothing has begun to work. Development of the AIDS Epidemic
Kaposi’s Sarcoma is a rare form of cancer often associated with AIDS tends to run in older people but in March of 1981 it was found to occur between young gay men…...

Similar Documents

Premium Essay

Change of Black Women in Society

...Response: “The Change of Black Women” From the late eighteenth century up until now a struggle for equality has been being fought by women, especially the black woman. Black women have been the most outspoken and influential group of women during this power struggle. I can explain this be saying that the black women had to put up with one: being black from the times of slavery in which blacks were treated as less than human, and two: they are in fact women whom had no respect in society and are still looked at as inferior to the male in today's society. So the Black woman has had to endure double the hard ships throughout their struggle in America. They fought this battle with resistance by means of resiliency they as a collective group have refuses to accept unjust unequal treatment. As I progressed through our class I realized that there are many different methods of resisting and refusing to accept things for the way they are. One of the most effective methods that women in general have used over the years is writing. Writing in itself is so expressive if ones feelings and opinions, and women have used this method to educate and relate to all audience and social classes. Black women have provided us with a plethora of different genres of writing from the slave narrative to books that specialize in educating the black woman of today's society they are all effective and critical mechanisms used by the Black woman and culture in society today. So the Black woman has the......

Words: 590 - Pages: 3

Free Essay

The History of Black Women Hair

...The History of Black Women Hair In the early year black women faces problems with managing their hair and creating different hair styles to wear. The black woman was limited to styles when it came to doing black hair. The texture of black women’s hair was woolly, thick, unmanageable and bushy. Many would cover their hair with wigs. Many kept their hair in a bush, or braids, and others pulled the hair back into a pony-tail. In 1905, steel hot comb with teeth spaced for apart for thick hair was invented by Sarah Breedlove giving the black women straight hair (Sarah Breedlove, 2009, p. 2). Women all over were using the straightening comb getting the straight long lengthy hair that was more manageable for combing. In 1928, Marjorie Joyner invented permanent relaxer for the black women hair (Bellis, 2009, p. 2). This new method would soften and smooth black women hair. The textured of the black women’s hair had changed stronger, straighter, more manageable, soft and smooth. The permanent relaxer was better than straightening comb because the straight of hair lasts longer after using the permanent relaxer. The styles were holding up longer. Being able to manage the hair became easier. Black women everywhere were using the product permanent relaxer in their hair. The permanent relaxer was such hit among the black women. Marjorie Joyner improved the permanent relaxer into a permanent wave machine that could perm and curl black women hair. The permanent relaxer......

Words: 418 - Pages: 2

Free Essay

Women Living Hiv

...Contemporary Problems Women Living With HIV/AIDS HSM/210 Human Services in the United States Delthea Taylor-Jones March 10th, 2013 Over 300,000 women were infected with H.I.V. as of the year 2011. (www.apps.who.int/gho/data/view.main.22300, 2013) Though a staggering statistic, these strong women are trying to pave a way of life into mainstream society. The vast majority of these women are someone’s mother, daughter, or sister that is focused on living a long normal life with an often deadly disease. Why are women the most infected with H.I.V. in any certain region that engulfed with the disease? Today nearly 60% of all adults living with HIV in the most affected regions are women. These statistics are astounding and as a country there needs to be an intense sense of urgency with this matter. In order to increase the response to the epidemic we need to make our response more effective, we need more women in decision-making, more access to information and services for sexual and reproductive health, and more focus on promoting and protecting the rights of women and girls. These women need to know that they are precious jewels of society and their knowledge and first-hand experience with the disease would prove to be vital in our fight to save thousands of lives of those future mothers of our earth. It has been said that every minute, another woman gets infected with H.I.V. and the infection rates in women ages 15-24 are twice as high as young men in the same......

Words: 838 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Hiv and Aids in African American Women

...Jennifer McKinnon HIV/AIDS Disease University of Phoenix HCS 245 Professor Tynan Weed June 2, 2013 Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome also known as AIDS is the final stage of the disease known as Human Immunodeficiency virus. To understand AIDS we first need to discuss HIV. HIV compromises the body’s ability to fight off infections, bacteria and other harmful microorganisms that attack ones immune system, this is usually what causes AIDS. After the body’s immune system is compromised the ability to naturally fight off these things is weakened and the likelihood that it will be attacked is dramatically increased. As the body is defending what it can the possibility of certain types of cancer is also raised. The HIV and/or AIDS disease can go undetected with no signs or symptoms for up to ten years. Scientists believe that the disease came from a chimpanzee and humans acquired it or became infected with it when they would hunt and eat these animals. Some of the factors that put African American women at a more vulnerable state in being infected with HIV and/or AIDS are barriers to testing and treatment, including poverty, limited access to healthcare or prevention education. Studies have shown the direct link of poverty in African American women to be consistent higher HIV and/or AIDS infection rate. The environmental factors that make African American women more vulnerable to HIV and/or AIDS are poverty with limited education. The consequences of not a having......

Words: 1003 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Aids in Black Women

...Asa S. Smith AIDS/HIV in Women Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, better known as AIDS, is a raging epidemic. Taking nearly 2.1 million lives and 300,000 children are living with the disease and it shows no sign of slowing down. A person has a collection of symptoms and or illnesses caused by the most advanced stages of HIV or Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection. Once the virus weakens your immune system, and your CD4 cells are reduced to a certain number, a patient is considered to have AIDS. This condition progressively reduces the effectiveness of the immune system and leaves individuals vulnerable to opportunistic infections and tumors. A common disbelief about the illness is that you can die from it which is not all factual. You can indeed die once you have contracted the illness but it is from your body’s inability to fight off the common colds and infections that cannot be cured by your immune system because it has become far too weak. AIDS first appeared July 5, 1981 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It was first reported in five homosexual men in Los Angeles. In the beginning, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention did not have an official name for the disease, often referring to it by way of the diseases that were associated with it, for example, lymphadenopathy, the disease after which the discoverers of HIV originally named the virus. They also used Kaposi's Sarcoma and Opportunistic Infections, the name by which a task......

Words: 1589 - Pages: 7

Premium Essay

Southern Black Women

...Black southern women and the civil rights movement Southern Black Women in the modern Civil Rights movement played a major role during the Civil rights movement. Women all over were trying to make a difference in the areas that they lived in mainly the south. In Merline Pitre's and Bruce Glasrud book Black Southern Women and the Civil Rights Movement. They begin to discuss southern black women perspective on racism and their experiences during the modern civil rights movement. These women protested, participated in sit in and help change the inequality in the Deep South. The book is divided up in chapter specific to the states that racism affected in the south. The books discuss women experiences they faced during the civil rights movement in different states. The modern civil rights movement according to the authors is specified as the period of time in the U.S from 1954-1974. Jim Crow laws were intact, schools were segregated. Public accommodations and voter’s registrations In the first few paragraphs discuss the scholarship on the civil rights movement. Paragraph one we are introduced to Irene Morgan and Barbara Johns both women talked about their experiences and how they led up to the freedom rides. We also are introduced to the Brown vs. Board of education, sought to end segregation in an institutional setting and spearheaded the movement to end segregation. The inequality of education was a major issue during the modern civil rights era. These women wanted......

Words: 616 - Pages: 3

Free Essay

Black Women in Civil Rights

...Black Woman Involved in the Black Power Movement Angela Davis HIU 301 Samantha Wilson December 4, 2013 There has been many civil rights movements throughout African American history, but none has gotten the most attention as the black power movement in the 1960s.Although we only hear about men during these periods there would not have been so much success without the women. The women were the real grassroots of the movement, but did not get as much recognition. When did the black power movement start? Many people are not sure, but the black power movement can be traced as far back to the 1920s with the Marcus Garvey movement, and his formation of the Universal Negro Improvement Association. The Universal Negro Improvement Association were followers of Marcus Garvey. Marcus Garvey was the first person to organize masses of black people, because he was very influential, he was able to attain that goal.1 The Marcus Garvey’s UNIA had the same goals like the black power, such as self-determination, self-pride, and unity. The UNIA slowly died down once Marcus Garvey became ill and subsequently died. 2 A couple of years after the UNIA died down, there were a couple of protests and marches such as the Meredith march and the march on Washington with A. Phillip Randolph and later Dr Martin Luther King. These marches did get some attention, but not the attention that the people desperately craved for.1 When you think of the......

Words: 2355 - Pages: 10

Premium Essay

Hiv in Black African American

...HIV in the African American Population HIV in the African American Population The year was 1981, and the first discovered cases of PCP, Pneumocystis Cabrini pneumonia was discovered in five young males who did not fit the norm for being diagnosed with this disease. In 1983, the isolation of a T lymph tropic retrovirus was found. In January 1983, the CDC reported a new disease which could be sexually transmitted both homosexually and heterosexual, passed from mother to infant, through blood and blood products. A note was made that the disease could also be passed from a negative host, who carried the disease asymptomatically. On February 7th, the world takes notice of the African American blacks and their relationship with the HIV/AIDS epidemic. In 2006, blacks composed approximately 12% of the United States population over the age of 13. Out of that reported number it was estimated that 46% of them are living with HIV/AIDS. 63% of those cases were from between male to male cases, with 83% new cases being from high risk heterosexual black females. The numbers from the CDC report it is an estimated 12.3 per 10,000 blacks that are currently affected yearly. Of all the ethnic and racial groups of the United States of America, the African Americans are the ones who have been to a larger extent faced with the HIV/AIDS burden. Statistics show that more than two hundred and thirty thousand African Americans have already passed on as a result of AIDS- a figure which......

Words: 2772 - Pages: 12

Premium Essay

Women and Hiv/Aids

...Women And HIV/AIDS in the United States Barbara Snyder HCS/455 October 22, 2013 Renee Skovira This summary will be focus on Women and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) in the U.S. What is HIV/AIDS, history since 1981 through 2010? Also, who are the stakeholders and how they are affected? In addition to this summary will examine what it is like living with HIV, statistics, according to The Kaiser Family Foundation there is a form of diagnostic testing, prevention care. HIV is a virus that once you have it, you will have it for life. HIV can be controlled with proper medications and medical care. A treatment for HIV is often called Antiretroviral Therapy (ART). HIV attacks specific cells in the immune system called CD4 cells, or T cells (Prevention C. F., 2013). HIV in the United States has been around for three decades. Women have been affected since then and heterosexuals transmission became known in the 1990’s. There are several ways to transmit this horrible disease with one being through drug use with needles, blood transfusions, and, of course, through multiple sexual encounters without protection. Women count for one in four of the more then one million people living with HIV in this country and one in five with new infections (Foundation, 2013). An estimated 1.1 million people are living with HIV in the U.S. It is a challenge living with HIV. “It is important that medications are taken as prescribed, as to when...

Words: 660 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Black Women Relationships with Black Men

...Dear Ms. Educated Black Woman                             Dexter R. Conner Upon realizing that my baby daughter would one day read this, I re-examined every word. To the most beautiful girl on earth – Daddy loves you. 1|Dear Ms Educated Black Woman Preface I began having serious thoughts pertaining to the dynamics of Black romantic relationships in college upon traveling to Atlanta and conversing for hours with Spelman College’s exceptional Black women. It was like the television show A Different World. While my reason for routinely making the two hour trip from my college was to convince a particular one of these women that she was to be my wife, it became clear that a unique dynamic was on the horizon. Many of the educated Black women I encountered had confidence in their academic and professional journey, but lacked clarity on whether enough educated Black men with at least an ounce of swagger shared their dream of creating a formidable family. It was a fair question then, and remains a growing dilemma affecting educated Black women today. Since that time I have consistently spoken with Brothers, Sisters, family members, friends, and others about the challenges facing Black relationships. Those conversations have inspired me to share my humble thoughts for anyone willing to indulge me. As you read beyond the passion of my words, hopefully sincerity and love will be visible, along with a creative spirit that you find interesting enough to continue the exposé....

Words: 5846 - Pages: 24

Free Essay

Hiv in Women

...Scholarly paper on HIV in women Student name: Institution: Introduction Relevant nursing issue Some of the questions that arise from women living with HIV are barrier to social services. It affects the livelihood of women; thus, they are unable to acquire some essential services. Another issue is that they have mental health problem; thus, they are placed at a higher risk for HIV infection. They also face stigmatization that is rooted in discrimination (Peninnah, 2013). Other issues that arise are limitation to children health care, misinformation regarding treatment options, lack of access to transportation, substance abuse in regard to treatment, and unstable housing. There are attempts that have been put to measure and understand one’s health status. The rules also incorporate the physical wellbeing, psychological status, and cognitive functioning (Deanna, 2013). The tests are referred to as Health-related quality of life (HRQoL). It is a way of knowing how individuals feel about their health. It is done from an interactive and interpretive point of view. It enables an empathetic understanding of daily life experience is different life settings. HRQoL also enhances the identification of the different race, gender, class and social positioning. It also considers social cultural and political forces. It has been knotted that,......

Words: 2360 - Pages: 10

Premium Essay

Blacks Living with Hiv

...HIV/AIDS in the U.S. University of Phoenix HCS/455 April 14, 2010 In every region of the world, more people are living with HIV/AIDS. This paper is written on the subject of black Americans living in the United States with HIV/AIDS, how the health care policy affects them and the different stakeholders that are being affected by the health care policy. The (CDC, 2010) explains that Black Americans have been excessively affected by HIV/AIDS since the beginning of the epidemic. Blacks account for more new HIV infections, AIDS diagnoses, people estimated to be living with HIV disease, and HIV-related deaths than any other racial/ethnic group in the U.S. The epidemic has also had an excessive impact on Black women, youth, and gay and bisexual men, and its impact varies across the country. The CDC claims that today, there are approximately 1.1 million people living with HIV/AIDS in the U.S, including more than 500,000 who are Black. Analysis of national household survey data found that 2% of Blacks in the U.S. were HIV positive, higher than any other group. Health insurance, whether it is public or private, improves access to care. Medicaid is the nation’s health insurance program for low-income Americans and the largest source of public funding for AIDS care, is a critical source of coverage for people with HIV/AIDS. Although the U.S. has been involved in efforts to address the global AIDS crisis since the mid 1980s, the......

Words: 499 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Black Women in Media

...Black Women in the Media Media is defined as a form of mass communication through the use of radio, television, the Internet, music, film, and etc. Throughout history, American media has not only been used as a form of communication and entertainment, but it has also been utilized to spread stereotypes and hegemonic ideals reinforcing the racial hierarchy that has continued to survive even after the abolition of slavery in the nineteenth century. According to Tilicia L. Mayo, Indiana University communications graduate, images in the media contain the ability to teach many different lessons. Mayo states, “Contemporary films and television shows deliver images that communicate ideologies such as class, standing and position in society” (vi). After the abolition of slavery, White America searched for means of social control through the media since they lacked the power of legal control. Black women, being of the lowest racial and gender classes in America, have repeatedly been stereotyped and victimized through the use of degrading images in contemporary media. The origins of these images can be found in the racist ideologies of the African slave woman created by White Euro-American slave owners. The images of black women in American media have directly affected how black women and other people in society define black womanhood. This influence directly shows how people utilize fictitious and stereotypical images from the media in trying to understand the stereotyped group and...

Words: 2030 - Pages: 9

Free Essay

Hiv and Young Black Americans

...HIV and Education 24 Nov 2011 HIV and Education Introduction HIV is a fast spreading disease in today’s world. It is important that people are aware of the symptoms and treatment of the disease. There are many people who are suffering from this disease but are unaware of it, because they do not know the symptoms of the disease. It is very important that the people are made aware of this disease so that they save the lives of the people around them (Landy, 2010). Discussion Its been long since the first case of HIV was reported, and since then the medical professionals are seeking the cure of this disease, but have been unable to find one. This disease is one of the deadly diseases of which the cure has not been found yet. People who are suffering from this disease are in need of a cure that will help the person live, but unfortunately, the cure has not been found. There are many reasons for the spread of this disease. One of the most prominent reasons for the spread of this disease is the sexual intercourse at young age. Sexuality is becoming very common in countries at a young age. Teenagers are indulging in this activity, which is causing an increase in the spread of this disease. Youngsters who are involved in this activity are unaware of the health consequences sexuality can have on them. Apart from the other health issues, one major health issue is the spread of HIV. Sex is......

Words: 670 - Pages: 3

Free Essay

Black Women and Pregnancy: Fibroids

...Black women and pregnancy: Fibroids by Kimberly Seals-Allers, author of The Mocha Manual to a Fabulous Pregnancy  Reviewed by the BabyCenter Medical Advisory Board Last updated: January 2010 What are fibroids? Fibroids are noncancerous tumors that grow from muscle tissue in the uterus. Fibroids, also called uterine leiomyomas or myomas, can grow on the outside of your uterine wall, within the uterine wall, or into the uterine cavity.   Women can have fibroids in one or more of these locations. The growths can be as small as a pea or as large as a basketball. But they are almost always benign, no matter how large they get. If a fibroid or cluster of fibroids is particularly large or is growing on the outside of the uterine wall, it can push the uterus into an abnormal position. It can also put pressure on the bladder or intestine, causing symptoms such as frequent urination, constipation, pelvic pain, or backache. Fibroids may also cause heavy menstrual bleeding. Fibroids can interfere with fertility, and they occasionally cause complications during pregnancy. For example, if a large fibroid blocks the opening of a woman's uterus, she may have to deliver her baby by c-section. African American women are more likely than other women to get fibroids, but any woman of any race can get them. Why is it especially important for black women to know about fibroids? In the United States, African American women have the highest rates of fibroids. They're two to three......

Words: 2214 - Pages: 9