Free Essay

Andes Flight Disaster

In: Historical Events

Submitted By gaby1997
Words 2825
Pages 12
Andes flight disaster
Uruguayan Air Force Flight 571, also known as the Andes flight disaster and, in South America, as the Miracle of the Andes (El Milagro de los Andes) was a chartered flight carrying 45 people, including a rugby union team, their friends, family and associates, that crashed in the Andes on 13 October 1972. More than a quarter of the passengers died in the crash and several others quickly succumbed to cold and injury. Of the 27 who were alive a few days after the accident, another eight were killed by an avalanche that swept over their shelter in the wreckage. The last 16 survivors were rescued on 23 December 1972, more than two months after the crash.
The survivors had little food and no source of heat in the harsh conditions at over 3,600 metres (11,800 ft) altitude. Faced with starvation and radio news reports that the search for them had been abandoned, the survivors fed on the dead passengers who had been preserved in the snow. Rescuers did not learn of the survivors until 72 days after the crash when passengers Nando Parrado and Roberto Canessa, after a 10-day trek across the Andes, found Chilean arriero Sergio Catalán, who gave them food and then alerted the authorities to the existence of the other survivors.
The crash
On 13 October 1972, a chartered Uruguayan Air Force twin turboprop Fairchild FH-227D was flying over the Andes carrying the Old Christians Club rugby union team from Montevideo, Uruguay, to play a match in Santiago, Chile. The trip had begun the day before, when the Fairchild departed from Carrasco International Airport, but inclement mountain weather forced an overnight stop in Mendoza, Argentina. At the Fairchild's ceiling of 9,000 metres (30,000 ft), the plane could not fly directly from Mendoza, over the Andes, to Santiago, in large part because of the weather. Instead, the pilots had to fly south from Mendoza parallel to the Andes, then turn west towards the mountains, fly through a low pass (Planchon), cross the mountains and emerge on the Chilean side of the Andes south of Curicó before finally turning north and initiating descent to Santiago after passing Curicó.
After resuming the flight on the afternoon of Friday 13 October, the plane was soon flying through the pass in the mountains. The pilot then notified air controllers in Santiago that he was over Curicó, Chile, and was cleared to descend. That proved to be a fatal error. Since the pass was covered by the clouds, the pilots had to rely on the usual time required to cross the pass (dead reckoning). They failed to take into account strong headwinds that slowed the plane and increased the time required to complete the crossing. They were not as far west as they thought and, as a result, the turn and descent were initiated too soon, before the plane had passed through the mountains, leading to a controlled flight into terrain.
Dipping into the cloud cover while still over the mountains, the Fairchild soon crashed on an unnamed peak (later called Cerro Seler, also known as Glaciar de las Lágrimas or Glacier of Tears), between Cerro Sosneado and Volcán Tinguiririca, straddling the remote mountainous border between Chile and Argentina. The plane clipped the peak at 4,200 metres (13,800 ft), severing the right wing, which was thrown back with such force that it cut off the vertical stabilizer, leaving a gaping hole in the rear of the fuselage. The plane then clipped a second peak which severed the left wing and left the plane as just a fuselage flying through the air. One of the propellers sliced through the fuselage as the wing it was attached to was severed. The fuselage hit the ground and slid down a steep mountain slope before finally coming to rest in a snow bank. The location of the crash site is 34°45′54″S 70°17′11″W, in the Argentine municipality of Malargüe (Malargüe Department, Mendoza Province).
Early days
Of the 45 people on the plane, 12 died in the crash or shortly thereafter; another five had died by the next morning, and one more succumbed to injuries on the eighth day. The remaining 27 faced severe difficulties in surviving in the freezing mountains at such a high altitude. Many had suffered injuries from the crash, including broken legs from the aircraft's seats piling together. The survivors lacked equipment such as cold-weather clothing and footwear suitable for the area, mountaineering goggles to prevent snow blindness (although one of the eventual survivors, 24-year-old Adolfo "Fito" Strauch, devised a couple of sunglasses by using the sun visors in the pilot's cabin which helped protect their eyes from the sun). They lacked any kind of medical supplies, and the death of Dr. Francisco Nicola left a first and a second year medical student who had survived the crash in charge to improvise splints and braces with salvaged parts of what remained of the aircraft.
The search
Search parties from three countries looked for the missing plane. Since the plane was white, it blended in with the snow, making it invisible from the sky. At one point the survivors tried to use several sticks of lipstick recovered from the luggage to write an SOS on the roof of the plane, but abandoned the effort after it became apparent that they lacked the necessary lipstick to make letters that would be plainly recognizable from the air. The initial search was cancelled after eight days. The survivors of the crash had found a small transistor radio on the plane and Roy Harley first heard the news that the search was cancelled on their 11th day on the mountain. Piers Paul Read in Alive: The Story of the Andes Survivors (a text based upon interviews with the survivors) described the moments after this discovery:
The others who had clustered around Roy, upon hearing the news, began to sob and pray, all except Parrado, who looked calmly up the mountains which rose to the west. Gustavo [Coco] Nicolich came out of the plane and, seeing their faces, knew what they had heard… [Nicolich] climbed through the hole in the wall of suitcases and rugby shirts, crouched at the mouth of the dim tunnel, and looked at the mournful faces which were turned towards him. 'Hey boys,' he shouted, 'there's some good news! We just heard on the radio. They've called off the search.' Inside the crowded plane there was silence. As the hopelessness of their predicament enveloped them, they wept. 'Why the hell is that good news?' Paez shouted angrily at Nicolich. 'Because it means,' [Nicolich] said, 'that we're going to get out of here on our own.' The courage of this one boy prevented a flood of total despair.
Cannibalism
The survivors had a small amount of food: a few chocolate bars, assorted snacks and several bottles of wine. During the days following the crash they divided out this food in very small amounts so as not to exhaust their meager supply. Fito Strauch also devised a way to melt snow into water by using metal from the seats and placing snow on it. The snow then melted in the sun and dripped into empty wine bottles. Even with this strict rationing, their food stock dwindled quickly. There was no natural vegetation or animals on the snow-covered mountain. The group survived by collectively making a decision to eat flesh from the bodies of their dead comrades. This decision was not taken lightly, as most were classmates or close friends. In his 2006 book, Miracle in the Andes: 72 Days on the Mountain and My Long Trek Home, Nando Parrado comments on this decision:
At high altitude, the body's caloric needs are astronomical... we were starving in earnest, with no hope of finding food, but our hunger soon grew so voracious that we searched anyway...again and again we scoured the fuselage in search of crumbs and morsels. We tried to eat strips of leather torn from pieces of luggage, though we knew that the chemicals they'd been treated with would do us more harm than good. We ripped open seat cushions hoping to find straw, but found only inedible upholstery foam... Again and again I came to the same conclusion: unless we wanted to eat the clothes we were wearing, there was nothing here but aluminium, plastic, ice, and rock.
All of the passengers were Roman Catholic. According to Read, some rationalized the act of necrotic cannibalism as equivalent to the ritual of Holy Communion, or justified it according to a Bible verse( no man hath greater love than this: that he lay down his life for his friends). Others initially had reservations, though after realizing that it was their only means of staying alive, changed their minds a few days later. There are reports that one older female passenger, Liliana, although not seriously injured in the crash, refused to eat human flesh due to her strong religious convictions – she died shortly thereafter, in the avalanche.
Avalanche
Eight of the initial survivors subsequently died on the afternoon of 29 October when an avalanche cascaded down on them as they slept in the fuselage. For three days they survived in an appallingly confined space since the plane was buried under several feet of snow. Nando Parrado was able to poke a hole in the roof of the fuselage with a metal pole, providing ventilation. Among the dead was Liliana Methol, wife of survivor Javier Methol. She had been the last surviving female passenger.
Hard decisions
Before the avalanche, a few of the survivors became insistent that their only way of survival would be to climb over the mountains themselves and search for help. Because of the co-pilot's assertion that the plane had passed Curicó (which was completely wrong, the real position was more than 55 miles (89 km) to the east deep in the Andes), the group assumed that the Chilean countryside was just a few miles away to the west. The plane had crashed inside Argentina, and unknown to the survivors, just 18 miles (29 km) west of an abandoned hotel named the Hotel Termas Sosneado. Several brief expeditions were made in the immediate vicinity of the plane in the first few weeks after the crash, but they found that a combination of altitude sickness, dehydration, snow blindness, malnourishment and the extreme cold of the nights made climbing any significant distance an impossible task.
Therefore it was decided that a group would be chosen, and then allocated the most rations of food and the warmest of clothes, and spared the daily manual labour around the crash site that was essential for the group's survival, so that they might build their strength. Although several survivors were determined to be on the expedition team no matter what, including Nando Parrado and Roberto Canessa, one of the two medical students, others were less willing or unsure of their ability to withstand such a physically exhausting ordeal. From the rest of the passengers, Numa Turcatti and Antonio Vizintin were chosen to accompany Canessa and Parrado. At Canessa's urging, they waited nearly seven days, to allow for the arrival of summer, and with it higher temperatures.
Although they were hoping to get to Chile, a large mountain lay due west of the crash site, blocking any effort they made to walk in that direction. Therefore they initially headed east, hoping that at some point the valley that they were in would do a U-turn and allow them to start walking west. After several hours of walking east, the trio unexpectedly found the tail section of the plane, which was still largely intact. Within and surrounding the tail were numerous suitcases that had belonged to the passengers, containing cigarettes, candy, clean clothing and even some comic books. The group decided to camp there that night inside the tail section, and continue east the next morning. However, on the second night of the expedition, which was their first night sleeping outside exposed to the elements, the group nearly froze to death. After some debate the next morning, they decided that it would be wiser to return to the tail, remove the plane's batteries and bring them back to the fuselage so that they might power up the radio and make an SOS call to Santiago for help.
Radio
Upon returning to the tail, the trio found that the batteries were too heavy to take back to the fuselage, which lay uphill from the tail section. They decided instead that it would be more effective to return to the fuselage and disconnect the radio system from the plane's electrical mainframe, take it back to the tail and connect it to the batteries, where they could then call for help. One of the other team members, Roy Harley, was an amateur electronics enthusiast, and they recruited his help in the endeavour. Unknown to any of the team members, the plane's electrical system used alternating current while the batteries in the tail produced direct current, making the plan futile from the beginning. After several days of trying to make the radio work at the tail, they gave up and returned to the fuselage with the knowledge that they would have to climb out of the mountains if they were to have any hope of being rescued.
The sleeping bag
It was now apparent that the only way out was to climb over the mountains to the west. They also realized that unless they found a way to survive the freezing temperature of the nights, a trek was impossible. It was at this point that the idea for a sleeping bag was raised.
In his book, Miracle in the Andes: 72 Days on the Mountain and My Long Trek Home, Nando Parrado would comment 34 years later upon the making of the sleeping bag:
The second challenge would be to protect ourselves from exposure, especially after sundown. At this time of year we could expect daytime temperatures well above freezing, but the nights were still cold enough to kill us, and we knew now that we couldn't expect to find shelter on the open slopes. We needed a way to survive the long nights without freezing, and the quilted batts of insulation we'd taken from the tail section gave us our solution ... as we brainstormed about the trip, we realized we could sew the patches together to create a large warm quilt. Then we realized that by folding the quilt in half and stitching the seams together, we could create an insulated sleeping bag large enough for all three expeditionaries to sleep in. With the warmth of three bodies trapped by the insulating cloth, we might be able to weather the coldest nights.
Carlitos [Páez] took on the challenge. His mother had taught him to sew when he was a boy, and with the needles and thread from the sewing kit found in his mother's cosmetic case, he began to work ... to speed the progress, Carlitos taught others to sew, and we all took our turns ... Coche [Inciarte], Gustavo [Zerbino], and Fito [Strauch] turned out to be our best and fastest tailors.
After the sleeping bag was completed and another survivor, Numa Turcatti, died from an illness, the hesitant Canessa was finally persuaded to set out, and the three men took to the mountain on 12 December.
December 12
On December 12, 1972, two months after the crash, Parrado, Canessa and Vizintín began their trek up the mountain. Parrado took the lead, and often had to be called to slow down, though the thin oxygen made it difficult for all of them. It was still bitterly cold but the sleeping bag allowed them to live through the nights. In the film Stranded, Canessa called the first night during the ascent, where they had difficulty finding a place to use the sleeping bag, the worst night of his life.
On the third day of the trek, Parrado reached the top of the mountain before the other two. Stretched before him as far as the eye could see were more mountains. In fact, he had just climbed one of the mountains (as high as 4,650 metres (15,260 ft)) which forms the border between Argentina and Chile, meaning that they were still tens of kilometres from the green valleys of Chile. After spying a small "Y" in the distance, he gauged that a way out of the mountains must lie beyond, and refused to give up hope. Knowing that the hike would take more energy than they had originally planned for, Parrado and Canessa sent Vizintín back to the crash site, as they were rapidly running out of rations. Since the return was entirely downhill, it only took him one hour to get back to the fuselage using a makeshift sleigh.…...

Similar Documents

Free Essay

Flight

...the hot air Kongming lantern, and kites. There are early legends of human flight such as the story of Icarus, and Jamshid in Persian myth, and later, somewhat more credible claims of short-distance human flights appear, such as the flying automaton of Archytas of Tarentum (428–347 BC),[4] the winged flights of Abbas Ibn Firnas (810–887), Eilmer of Malmesbury (11th century), and the hot-air Passarola of Bartolomeu Lourenço de Gusmão (1685–1724). The modern age of aviation began with the first untethered human lighter-than-air flight on November 21, 1783, in a hot air balloon designed by the Montgolfier brothers. The practicality of balloons was limited because they could only travel downwind. It was immediately recognized that a steerable, or dirigible, balloon was required. Jean-Pierre Blanchard flew the first human-powered dirigible in 1784 and crossed the English Channel in one in 1785. In 1799 Sir George Cayley set forth the concept of the modern airplane as a fixed-wing flying machine with separate systems for lift, propulsion, and control.[5][6] Early dirigible developments included machine-powered propulsion (Henri Giffard, 1852), rigid frames (David Schwarz, 1896), and improved speed and maneuverability (Alberto Santos-Dumont, 1901) First assisted take-off flight by the Wright Brothers, December 17, 1903 While there are many competing claims for the earliest powered, heavier-than-air flight, the most widely-accepted date is December 17, 1903 by the Wright......

Words: 2488 - Pages: 10

Premium Essay

Flight

...Flight By Doris Lessing In the short story "Flight" by Alice Lessing, it's the story of an old man who raises homing pigeons for a hobby and who constantly worries about his last granddaughter, Alice, leaving and getting married tothe postmaster's son, Steven. The old man is very overprotective and also possessive of his daughter.In a way, the grandfather is also jealous of Alice's fiancé, Steven. The Old man argues with Aliceabout her behaviour when Steven is with her and he complains to his daughter, Alice's mother, Lucy.In this story, Lessing wanted to show that part of growing up is leaving "the nest" and becoming moreindependent. Another part of growing up is letting go and moving on with ones life. Lessing uses a lotof techniques and devices in this short story like setting, point of view and symbolism.The setting of this story plays an important role in learning where the story takes place in, when thestory takes places and what the social environment was in the story. Lessing didn't actually mentiondirectly the setting of "Flight" but Lessing did leave a couple of clues to figure out the setting. Manyof the details in the story could mislead us into thinking that the story took place somewhere English.For example; serving tea and Lucy's sewing. Actually the story takes in places in South Africa. Theclue which tells the true setting of story is frangipani tree which is repeatedly mentioned throughoutthe story. The time of the story was harder to figure out since......

Words: 722 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Flight

...Doris Lessing’s "Flight" is a short story revolving around an old man and his learning of accepting in life. The author, however, does not let her readers know much about the old man, especially in the sphere of physical appearance. Even his name is not known to the readers. Doris Lessing, alternatively, aims to steer her readers to centre on the old man’s inner feelings, i.e. his weird mood and his consequent eccentric behaviors. A close and careful analysis is essential for us to somehow get a reasonable explanation about his eccentricities. The old man keeps pigeons and considers the dovecote his refuge. These little birds are seemingly his only pleasure in life, for all of his three grand daughters have gone with their husbands, leaving him with his daughter Lucy and the young Alice. Because Alice is the last grand daughter to stay with him, and because she is going to get married, he feels possessive towards her. Never does he want her to leave as do her sisters. He always wants to keep her, to have control on her, and to never let her leave, for fear that she will never come back to him, like the way he prevents his favorite pigeon from flying back to the sky. He keeps on considering Alice as still a child and on objecting her courtship with Steven the postmaster’s son. This possessive and somewhat selfish attitude has led to his unconventional behaviors. Miserably and angrily he shouts at her, asking her old-fashioned phrases stating his objection to her future......

Words: 628 - Pages: 3

Free Essay

Andes Moutains

...The Andes form the backbone of Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, and Chile. It is the longest unbroken mountain chain in the world, soaring higher than any range except the Himalayas in South Asia. Some of the Andes’ snowcapped peaks tower more than 20,000 feet (6,000 m) above sea level. The Andes have shaped not only the physical geography of the Andean nations, but also the economies and lifestyles of the people who make their homes in this region. The Andes stretch some 5,500 miles (8,850 km) all the way from the Caribbean Sea to the southernmost tip of South America. At places in Peru and Bolivia the mountain range is nearly 500 miles (800 km) wide. Its rocky walls divide the Andean nations into three distinct environments: coastal plain, highlands, and forest. Coastal Plain Between the mountains and the sea, a narrow plain stretches along the entire Pacific coast from Colombia to the southern end of Chile. At some points it is no more than a sandy beach at the foot of the mountains; in other places it reaches inland for 100 miles (160 km). The Atacama Desert, the driest and one of the most lifeless places on earth, occupies the coastal plain in northern Chile. Because ocean winds lose their moisture blowing across the cold waters of the Peru Current, only dry air ever reaches the land, creating a desolate wasteland. The Atacama is so dry that archaeologists have found perfectly preserved relics from ancient times. These include colored textiles woven hundreds of years......

Words: 2262 - Pages: 10

Free Essay

The Flight

...Rachelleen A. Rodriguez Class no. 23 The Flight (Final paper) Jenny arrived at the airport looking like she just got up from bed. Her hair was quite messy and one of the buttons from her blouse was wrongly placed. She was very busy cramming for her report the night before so she awoke late the next day. She prepared to leave her apartment almost as soon as she had waked up. She couldn’t possibly miss that flight. It was her promise to get home for their family reunion which was planned long before. Luckily, she made it just in time. The plane was about to leave in 10 minutes. After all the necessary arrangements, Jenny was finally seated in the plane. She took her seat next to a man, who was about in his late 20s. He looked pale, and his thick glasses made him appear nerdy. “There could be no weather as ideal as this,” Jenny thought as she stared though the plane’s window. The white fluffy clouds complemented the light blue sky perfectly. “Yes Mom, I’m on the plane,” Jenny said on the phone. “Your dad and I are very excited. We can’t wait till you come home. Everyone is going to be here, you will finally meet your sister’s fiancé.” “Really? She’s getting married?” Jenny exclaimed. “Passengers fasten your seatbelts. The plane is ready for takeoff.” “Oh Mom, the plane’s about to leave, see you later, love you,” then she put her cellphone back in her purse. She gave a loud sigh. Jenny was......

Words: 1078 - Pages: 5

Free Essay

Flight

...week, but it’s little expensive to rent planes. So, I’m saving up for my own Cessna 120 for almost two years now but it’s feels like ten years” (Palmer). However, the history of flight goes back more than a century. “From the earliest times, the desire to fly has been a powerful urge. Although people could walk, swim, or travel by ship or carriage, for centuries they were frustrated by inability to emulate birds” (Mondey). That urge cost people their lives as many made attempts to fly, but most failed. However they all had the same idea of birds being the key. “People strapped themselves to wings and jumped off cliffs and other simply watched the birds fly as they took notes. Some studied the feathers from birds and theorized that feathers glided light enough to defy gravity, and others just deemed flight far too dangerous to even attempt” (Prewitt). Stephen Mathew, a plane engineer now attending Sac State for his BA, notified, “Most people got mislead that birds fly by moving their wings downward and backward in a rowing motion rather than an up and down motion as we know today. That’s probably one of the reasons why the invention of flight took so long as it did.” In the book “Flight”, H. Stever points out that the final blueprint of a plane takes into consideration the four basic essentials of flight: aerodynamics, propulsion, structure, and control. Those principles incorporated enable airplanes to overcome the force of gravity and therefore fly. (53) Aerodynamics,......

Words: 2369 - Pages: 10

Free Essay

Flight

... Number: A20131117-22Paper title: Flight Safety ( Aviation )Academic level: High schoolDeadline: Nov 23, 2013 12:13Pages: 7Spacing: | Sources amount: 9Subject:Formatting style: APAType: Essay | Proofreader file: | Details: Please follow the instruction on the attached file. | Essay Flight Safety Automation makes flight safer - discuss Consider the elements of automation from manual systems that incorporate an autopilot to fully automated modern systems such as the Airbus A380. How is flight made safer by these systems and what are the dangers of relying too heavily on automation? Discuss the concept of ‘automation surprise’ and illustrate your argument with incidents or accidents from investigations Here are some ideas: Qantas flight 72 - sudden loss of height. 2008 Strasbourg - Air inter 320, 1992. Mode error. Air France, 447 2009, loss of control accident Colgan Air Flight 2009 – mode error Turkish Airways 2009 – Automation surprise Your essay needs to be 2000 – 3000 words long and have an: Abstract Introduction Body of essay Discussion Conclusion References using APA style This is an individual essay. Your essay needs to be 2000 – 3000 words long and have an: Abstract Introduction Body of essay Discussion/Conclusion References using APA style Abstract Should be approximately 150 - 200 words in length and reflect the whole of the essay including the results. In other words it is a summary. An example of an abstract Concurrent verbalization has been used as a......

Words: 742 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Flight

...Flight Doris Lessing Text 2 The grandfather has some issues with being abandoned. He feels that the youngest granddaughter is still too young to be married; therefore he is not willing to let go of her. His attitude is very overprotective and grumpy, but deep down inside it hurts him to see her growing up. He wants her to stay carefree, teasing and giggling as a child, not to grow up and become an adult. The fact we do not hear anything about his wife, tells us somehow she is gone. All he has left is his daughter and his granddaughter. His daughter got married to a man when she was seventeen years old. The other three granddaughters also got married and moved away. This only makes him madder – because he does not want to loose the last granddaughter, Alice. He knows after Alice gets married, nothing will ever be the same again. He thinks she is far too young to get married and just wants her to stay. Miserably and angrily he shouts at her, asking her old-fashioned phrases stating his objection to her future marriage, and eventually threatening to tell her mother when she disobeys him. Possessiveness and selfishness have blinded him. The grandfather’s anger towards Alice is because she is leaving him for another man, and the anger towards his daughter Lucy is because she gives Alice permission to leave. The old man who is also the main character, lives in a house by the railroad with his daughter and granddaughter. He keeps birds in his house. The birds are very......

Words: 763 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Flight

...B – Flight Every single human in this world has a dream about something. Everyone wants to pursue their dreams, but some people try harder than others to follow their dreams. Unfortunately it doesn’t always go the way it should. Alice Hoffman presents this theme in the short story “Flight”, which was written in year 2000. In the story we meet the two characters Eugene Kessler and Jason. Through a characterisation of them both you can see similarities and differences between them. Jason is described as a serious and responsible man, who never breaks any rules. He goes to the university Harvard with Eugene, and he strives to be as good as possible. He has dedicated a lot of time to his science project, which includes 20 hamsters having two different diets. Eugene is a quite different character. He doesn’t care much about the rules and in fact he had a business selling term papers before he went to Harvard, and afterwards the narrator of the story took over the business for him. He has an owl, which is flying free in the evening. Once there was an incident with his owl, which had carried of a toy poodle, and Eugene was told by a lieutenant at the police department that he should keep his owl in its cage at all times, but he doesn’t really seem to care. Jason’s hamsters and Eugene’s owl symbolize a great difference between these two characters. One half of Jason’s hamsters only eat Twinkies whereas the other half is fed with nuts and grains. In this context there is a very......

Words: 1187 - Pages: 5

Free Essay

Flight

...Travon Gaines Professor Thompson English 1A 7 February 2015 Flight In the novel Flight by Sherman Alexie it shows how the character Zits transforms the way he views life by taking a “flight.” This novel takes Zits on a journey back into time to give him a reality check on what could possibly be and see all the things that he does not want to be like. Flight gives the reader a clear understanding on how he struggles because he has faced many hardships through his fifteen years of life. The title to this story is actually interesting because it isn’t what I would expect after reading this story. This title takes on a role that is unique. The meaning of flight based off of this novel is to take a trip to the past centuries and be able to experience what it was like and what Zits does not want to feel like. When Zits took the place of Hank and his partner was Art he felt bad that he was forced to shoot the teenager after Art had killed him already. When Art says, “shoot junior” (Alexie 53) and Hanks response is “He’s already dead.” (Alexie 53). Zits realized that when he was in the bank he could’ve have been a heartless person just like the two crooked cops were and he actually wanted to make a change in his life rather than keep messing up. He experienced many situations of this flight because of the thoughts he had while at the bank. Michael went on many flights such as going back to the eighteenth and nineteenth and eventually to his father and realized he didn’t want...

Words: 621 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Flight

...CASE APPLICATION Flight Plans CHAPTER 1 | MANAGEMENT AND ORGANIZATIONS 25 With a small year-round population, Branson, Missouri, is in a location not easily accessible by air service.45 The city, best known for its country music and music variety shows and family-style attractions, also has the kinds of outdoor activities that attracted more than 8 million visitors last year, earning it the unofficial nickname ‘Vegas without the gambling.’” About 95 percent of those visitors come by car or bus. But now there’s a new show in town—the Branson Airport. The $155 million airport, which opened in May 2009, is an experiment that many people are watching. The airport is generating interest from city governments and the travel industry because it’s the nation’s first commercial airport built and operated as a private, for-profit business with absolutely no government funding. As one expert said, “...unpretentious little Branson Airport could have an outsize effect it if works. It could turn what now is a mostly regional tourist spot into a national destination for tourists.” Steve Peet, the airport’s chief executive, admits that he had no idea where Branson was in 2000. But by 2004, he was convinced there was money to be made flying tourists there. He says, “If you were ever going to think about building a private commercial airport, this would be the place to do it. How many more visitors would come here if we made it easier and affordable for them? It seemed like an......

Words: 744 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Flight

...Summary Flight is a short story written by Alice Hoffman. This story mainly focuses on three main characters that live in the suburb of Franconia. The narrator who has an older brother called Jason and Jason’s best friend, Eugene. Eugene is considered to be the narrator’s partner in crime. Eugene and the narrator started a business together where they sold term papers so they could earn enough money to escape Franconia. While Jason is unknowing of their sneaky business, he is busy conducting a special diet experiment in his bedroom involving his twenty hamsters. The principal at the school suspends Eugene and the nameless narrator after finding out that they sold term papers to other students. After the suspension, Eugene buys a plane ticket to San Francisco leaving his pet (owl) behind, as a responsibility to Jason’s sister. Jason’s sister takes it home where it later kills all Jason’s hamsters, forcing Jason to buy new pets but this time Jason decides to buy chicks. Characterization. The narrator in this story is nameless and genderless, by the emotions she/he expresses throughout the story; one might think that the narrator could be a girl. In line 2 she/he says that ‘’ it wasn’t so much that Eugene and I liked each other, or that there was any possibility of romance between us”, this indicates that the narrator could be female or a homosexual man, considering the fact that she/he points out that there was no possibility of romance between their relationship. The......

Words: 602 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Flight

...nothing nice to say it can turn out hurting you more than helping you. That’s why I choose flight. Being able to fly anywhere at any time would be the most enjoyable and exciting way to travel. I have had dreams where I was able to fly and it felt so real was unforgettable. I am very passionate about surfing, so to be able to wake up in the morning to go check out the waves with my surfboard and board shorts would be prodigious. Just the view from up high would let you see the waves better and see where the sets were coming in and breaking better. Even if you were late to school or work, with the advantage of flight you could be early everywhere you go. Flight could be better that being invisible because flying to anywhere you wanted to go you could land softly with zero noise and act like you weren’t there. For intense landing on a roof with that person’s window open so you could hear what they were saying. Flying could give you both powers if you played it right and were sneaky enough. Being able to fly has been a childhood dream of mine since I could remember. If there were no such thing as Super Man or any other super hero that could fly, flight would still be so attractive because of its gracefulness. I also love to travel and the cost of traveling is expensive. This would cut my travel bill in half. I asked my six year old son the same question and he responded with flight. He also mentioned that being invisible would be cool but it would get boring after a......

Words: 452 - Pages: 2

Free Essay

Flight

...Alice Hoffman Flight Eugene Kessler was supposed to be my brother's best friend, but he and I actually had a lot more in common. It wasn't so much that Eugene and I liked each other, or that there was any possibility of romance between us. It was more that we both despised Franconia, the suburb where we were doomed to live. In Franconia, no one's imagination was working overtime, that much was evident from the moment you first walked through town, where you could find the Franconia High School, the Franconia Mail, the Franconia Diner, and, for special occasions - proms, for instance, or extramarital trysts - the Franconia Steak House, which Eugene and I called Marie's, not only because Marie Fortuna's husband caught her there, eating antipasto with her boyfriend, who happened to be the soccer coach at the high school, but because we couldn't stand to hear the word Franconia used one more time. Eugene and I were in business together, earning money for our escape from town by selling term papers, and June was our busiest time of the year. By the end of the month, however, we were no longer doing our best work. The pressure was on, the stupid among us had panicked, and I was writing all night. In part, I kept odd hours because my brother strongly disapproved of our venture, and Jason was so honest and good that a single look from him could make a person feel sordid and corrupt. But the real reason I was writing three or more papers at a time was that Eugene was in charge......

Words: 2004 - Pages: 9

Premium Essay

Flight

...Flight Pepé Torres a lazy boy but also very polite who plays with his late father's switchblade, throwing the knife to the post all the time. Living with his siblings and his widow mother, Mama Torres. Mama Torres being a protective mother tells Pepé that he must take the horse and ride to Monterey for medicine and salt. Pepé shocked that she would tell him do such a thing. Mama Torres still believing that he is not a man yet but a peanut. As Pepé left his younger brother asked, “Did Pepé come to be a man.” Mama be as wise as she is said, “A boy gets to be a man when a man is needed.” But no matter how wise she was she could not foresee what would conspire in Pepé’s travel. When Pepé returned home in the middle of the night he changed. He didn’t seem fragile anymore, no laughter, his eyes with purpose. He told his mother he was called names he “could not allow” by a man. Where a fight escalated to a killing with the very same knife. His mother then nodded saying, “Thou art a man.” She then helps Pepé get items ready to go to the mountains. As he leaves she then starts crying, screaming knowing that he will not survive. As he was killed by an avalanche. So far out of few stories so far I say this is my favorite. In the story I like the complete character change Pepé had in the story. From just a boy who rather just sit and play with a knife to a man who is struggling to survive in the wilderness. He changed so drastically that even his mother who believed him nothing......

Words: 452 - Pages: 2