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Abolitionist

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The goal of the abolitionist movement was the fast emancipation of all slaves and the end of racial discrimination and exclusion. Abolitionism was partly fueled by Second Great Awakening, which encouraged many people to advocate for emancipation on religious grounds. Abolitionist ideas became increasingly noticeable, which contributed to the regional hostility between North and South leading up to the Civil War. Some Americans felt slavery was necessary for the prosperity of the country, they needed cheap labor in order to support their lifestyle. Others deep down felt that slavery was wrong, Slavery goes against their religious belief. The Abolitionist movement consisted in free blacks, white women and men.
Even in colonial times, American societies struggled with the issue of slavery. This continued to be a major issue after independence. The independent, idealistic, and often deeply pious thought that had spurred so many immigrant journeys to the New World also prompted a great many antislavery sentiments among individuals and larger groups. Religion, politics, and philosophy all spurred antislavery activism at various times and in various places. Yet southerners would later mobilize these same forces to defend slavery during the nineteenth century.
The Abolitionist Strategy
There were many ways Abolitionist tackle the anti-slavery campaign, they develop and three prong attack strategy which consisted in a religious campaign, a political campaign and aiding the fugitive slaves.
Religious Campaign
On their religious campaign, the Abolitionist began by appealing to religious believers. In 1837, Theodore Weld published “The Bible Against Slavery”, which used passages and stories from the holy book to compared it with slave owner’s actions and discredit slavery. Theodore Weld also teamed up with the Grimké sisters, Angelina, which became his wife, and Sarah. The…...

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